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Mary Shelley
Mary Wollstonecraft
Mary Wollstonecraft
Shelley
Shelley
(née Godwin; 30 August 1797 – 1 February 1851) was an English novelist, short story writer, dramatist, essayist, biographer, and travel writer, best known for her Gothic novel Frankenstein: or, The Modern Prometheus
Prometheus
(1818). She also edited and promoted the works of her husband, the Romantic poet and philosopher Percy Bysshe Shelley. Her father was the political philosopher William Godwin, and her mother was the philosopher and feminist Mary
Mary
Wollstonecraft. After Wollstonecraft's death less than a month after her daughter Mary was born, Mary
Mary
was raised by Godwin, who was able to provide his daughter with a rich, if informal, education, encouraging her to adhere to his own liberal political theories
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Calais
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Calais
Calais
(UK: /ˈkæleɪ/, US: /kæˈleɪ/, traditionally /ˈkælɪs/; French: [kalɛ]; Picard: Calés; Dutch: Kales) is a town and major ferry port in northern France
France
in the department of Pas-de-Calais, of which it is a sub-prefecture. Although Calais
Calais
is by far the largest city in Pas-de-Calais, the department's prefecture is its third-largest city of Arras
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Radicalism (historical)
The term "Radical" (from the Latin
Latin
radix meaning root) during the late 18th-century and early 19th-century identified proponents of democratic reform, in what subsequently became the parliamentary Radical Movement. Historically, Radicalism began in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
with political support for a "radical reform" of the electoral system to widen the franchise. Some radicals sought republicanism, abolition of titles, redistribution of property and freedom of the press. In France
France
in the nineteenth century, the Republican, Radical and Radical-Socialist Party, initially identifying itself as a far-left party,[citation needed] opposed to more right-wing parties (such as the Orléanists, the Legitimists
Legitimists
and the Bonapartists), eventually became the most important party of the Third Republic
Republic
(1871–1940)
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Somers Town, London
Somers
Somers
may refer to: Places[edit] In AustraliaSomers, VictoriaIn the United StatesSomers, Connecticut Somers, Iowa Somers, Montana Somers, New York Somers
Somers
Point, New Jersey Somers, Wisconsin, a village
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Viareggio
Viareggio
Viareggio
(Italian pronunciation: [vi.aˈreddʒo; vjaˈreddʒo]) is a city and comune in northern Tuscany, Italy, on the coast of the Tyrrhenian Sea. With a population of over 62,000, it is the second largest city within the province of Lucca, after Lucca. It is known as a seaside resort as well as being the home of the famous carnival of Viareggio
Viareggio
(dating back to 1873), and its papier-mâché floats, which (since 1925), parade along the promenade known as "Passeggiata a mare", in the weeks of Carnival. The symbol of the carnival of Viareggio
Viareggio
and its official mask is Burlamacco, designed and invented by Uberto Bonetti in 1930. The city traces its roots back to the first half of the 16th century when it became the only gate to the sea for the Republic of Lucca
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Charles Kegan Paul
Charles Kegan Paul
Charles Kegan Paul
(1828 – 19 July 1902) was an English publisher and author.Contents1 Biography 2 Works 3 Family 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Paul was born at White Lackington, Somerset, and was educated at Eton and at Exeter College, Oxford. He became curate at Great Tew
Great Tew
in 1851. From 1853 to 1862 he was a master at Eton. After twelve years as vicar of Sturminster Marshall
Sturminster Marshall
from 1862 to 1874, he entered the publishing business in London, from which he retired in 1899. Kegan Paul's business was continued by Kegan Paul, Trench, Trübner & Co. which merged with George Routledge
Routledge
in 1912. He left the Church of England
England
for Positivism, and in his last years entered the Roman Catholic Church
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Geneva
Geneva
Geneva
(/dʒɪˈniːvə/, French: Genève [ʒənɛv], Arpitan: Genèva [dzəˈnɛva], German: Genf [ɡɛnf], Italian: Ginevra [dʒiˈneːvra], Romansh: Genevra) is the second-most populous city in Switzerland
Switzerland
(after Zürich) and is the most populous city of the Romandy, the French-speaking part of Switzerland
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Debtor's Prison
A debtors' prison is a prison for people who are unable to pay debt. Through the mid 19th century, debtors' prisons (usually similar in form to locked workhouses) were a common way to deal with unpaid debt in places like Western Europe.[1] Destitute persons who were unable to pay a court-ordered judgment would be incarcerated in these prisons until they had worked off their debt via labor or secured outside funds to pay the balance. The product of their labor went towards both the costs of their incarceration and their accrued debt
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Francis Place
Francis Place
Francis Place
(3 November 1771, London
London
– 1 January 1854, London) was an English social reformer.Contents1 Early career and influence 2 Energetic Radical 3 Moral-force Chartist and old age 4 Memorials 5 Legacy 6 See also 7 Notes 8 Bibliography 9 External linksEarly career and influence[edit] He was the illegitimate son of Simon Place and Mary Gray, and had a rough upbringing; his father ran a London
London
sponging-house in Vinegar Yard, near Drury Lane, and Place was born there. He was schooled to 1785 before being apprenticed to a leather-breeches maker in Temple Bar.[1] At eighteen Place was an independent journeyman, and in 1790 was married and moved to a house near the Strand
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Camden Town
Camden Town
Camden Town
(/ˈkæmdən/ ( listen)), often shortened to Camden (a term also used for the entire borough), is a district of north west London, England, located 2.4 miles (3.9 km) north of Charing Cross. It is the administrative centre of the London
London
Borough of Camden, and identified in the London
London
Plan as one of 35 major centres in Greater London. Laid out as a residential district from 1791 and originally part of the manor of Kentish Town
Kentish Town
and the parish of St Pancras, London, Camden Town became an important location during the early development of the railways, which reinforced its position on the London
London
canal network. The area's industrial economic base has been replaced by service industries such as retail, tourism and entertainment
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St Pancras, London
St Pancras (/sənt ˈpæŋkrəs/) is an area of central London. For many centuries the name was used for various officially designated areas, but it is now used mainly for the railway station and for upmarket venues in the immediate locality, having been largely superseded by other place names including Kings Cross and Somers Town.Contents1 History1.1 Ancient parish 1.2 Metropolitan borough2 Cemeteries 3 Political divisions 4 Landmarks4.1 Transport5 Notable residents 6 ReferencesHistory[edit] Ancient parish[edit]A map showing the wards of St Pancras Metropolitan Borough as they appeared in 1916.The district now encompassed by the term "St Pancras" is not easy to define, and its usage as a place name is fairly limited. The name is sometimes applied to the immediate vicinity of the eponymous railway station, but King's Cross is the usual name for the area around the two mainline stations as a whole.Topographical survey of St. Marylebone, St
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Political Philosopher
Political philosophy, or political theory, is the study of topics such as politics, liberty, justice, property, rights, law, and the enforcement of laws by authority: what they are, why (or even if) they are needed, what, if anything, makes a government legitimate, what rights and freedoms it should protect and why, what form it should take and why, what the law is, and what duties citizens owe to a legitimate government, if any, and when it may be legitimately overthrown, if ever. In a vernacular sense, the term "political philosophy" often refers to a general view, or specific ethic, political belief or attitude, about politics, synonymous to the term "political ideology". Political philosophy
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Aaron Burr
American Revolutionary WarBattle of Quebec Battle of Monmouth Aaron Burr
Aaron Burr
Jr. (February 6, 1756 – September 14, 1836) was an American politician. He was the third Vice President of the United States (1801–1805), serving during Thomas Jefferson's first term. Burr served as a Continental Army
Continental Army
officer in the Revolutionary War, after which he became a successful lawyer and politician. He was elected twice to the New York State Assembly
New York State Assembly
(1784–1785, 1798–1799),[1] was appointed New York State Attorney General (1789–1791), was chosen as a U.S. senator (1791–1797), from the State of New York, and reached the apex of his career as vice president. The highlight of Burr's tenure as president of the Senate, one of his few official duties as vice president, was the Senate's first impeachment trial, that of Supreme Court justice Samuel Chase
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Governess
A governess is a woman employed to teach and train children in a private household. In contrast to a nanny (formerly called a nurse), she concentrates on teaching children instead of meeting their physical needs. Her charges are of school age rather than babies.[1] The position of governess used to be common in well-off European families before the First World War, especially in the countryside where no suitable school existed nearby. Parents' preference to educate their children at home—rather than send them away to boarding school for months at a time—varied across time and countries. Governesses were usually in charge of girls and younger boys
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Ramsgate
Ramsgate
Ramsgate
is a seaside town in the district of Thanet
Thanet
in east Kent, England. It was one of the great English seaside towns of the 19th century. In 2001 it had a population of around 40,000. Ramsgate’s main attraction is its coastline, and its main industries are tourism and fishing
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Travel Literature
The genre of travel literature encompasses outdoor literature, guide books, nature writing, and travel memoirs.[1] One early travel memoirist in Western literature was Pausanias, a Greek geographer of the 2nd century AD
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