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Panchamakara
Panchamakara, also known as the Five Ms, is a Tantric term referring to the five substances used in a Tantric practice.madya (wine) māṃsa (meat) matsya (fish) mudrā (parched grain) maithuna (sexual intercourse)Taboo-breaking elements are only practiced literally by "left-hand path" tantrics (vāmācārins), whereas "right-hand path" tantrics (dakṣiṇācārins) oppose these.(Rawson, 1978).Contents1 Interpretations of the Panchamakaras1.1 Arthur Avalon
Arthur Avalon
(Sir John Woodroffe) 1.2 Prabhat Ranjan Sarkar 1.3 Dakṣiṇācāra2 See also 3 Notes 4 ReferencesInterpretations of the Panchamakaras[edit] Arthur Avalon
Arthur Avalon
(Sir John Woodroffe)[edit] In the introduction of his translation of the Mahanirvana Tantra, Sir John Woodroffe, under the pseudonym Arthur Avalon, describes the Panchamakara thus.There are, as already stated, three classes of men: Pashu, Vira and Divya
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Yajna
Yajna
Yajna
(IAST: yajña) literally means "sacrifice, devotion, worship, offering", and refers in Hinduism
Hinduism
to any ritual done in front of a sacred fire, often with mantras.[1] Yajna
Yajna
has been a Vedic tradition, described in a layer of Vedic literature called Brahmanas, as well as Yajurveda.[2] The tradition has evolved from offering oblations and libations into sacred fire to symbolic offerings in the presence of sacred fire (Agni).[1] Yajna
Yajna
rituals-related texts have been called the Karma-kanda (ritual works) portion of the Vedic literature, in contrast to Jnana-kanda (knowledge) portion contained in the Vedic Upanishads
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Prabhat Ranjan Sarkar
VedantaAdvaita Vishishtadvaita Dvaita
Dvaita
Vedanta Bhedabheda Dvaitadvaita Achintya Bheda Abheda ShuddhadvaitaHeterodoxCharvaka Ājīvika Buddhism JainismOther schoolsVaishnava Smarta Shakta ĪśvaraShaiva: Pratyabhijña Pashupata SiddhantaTantraTeachers (Acharyas)NyayaAkṣapāda Gotama Jayanta Bhatta Raghunatha SiromaniMīmāṃsāJaimini Kumārila Bhaṭṭa PrabhākaraAdvaita VedantaGaudapada Adi Shankara Vācaspati Miśra Vidyaranya Sadananda Madhusūdana Sarasvatī Vijnanabhiksu Ramakrishna Vivekananda Ra
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Homa (ritual)
ArtsBharatanatyam Kathak Kathakali Kuchipudi Manipuri Mohiniyattam Odissi Sattriya Bhagavata Mela Yakshagana Dandiya Raas Carnatic musicRites of passageGarbhadhana Pumsavana Simantonayana Jatakarma Namakarana Nishkramana Annaprashana Chudakarana Karnavedha Vidyarambha Upanayana Keshanta Ritushuddhi Samavartana Vivaha AntyeshtiAshrama DharmaAshrama: Brahmacharya Grihastha Vanaprastha SannyasaFestivalsDiwali Holi Shivaratri Navaratri Durga
Durga
Puja Ramlila Vijayadashami-Dussehra


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Utsava
Uthsava or Utsava
Utsava
or Utsav is derived from the Sanskrit
Sanskrit
word, Utsava. Utsava
Utsava
generally means a festival or celebration or any joyous occasion.[1][2] It also carries the meaning of delight, merriment and pleasure.[3] The Sanskrit
Sanskrit
word Utsava
Utsava
comes from the word "ut" meaning "removal" and "sava" which means "worldly sorrows" or "grief".[4] See also[edit]Brahmotsavam Moolavar VasanthotsavamReferences[edit]Wikimedia Commons has media related to Utsava.^ Sanskrit
Sanskrit
Dictionary ^ Utsava
Utsava
- Lets celebrate life ^ nathdwara.in ^ Sri Venkateswara Swami Temple of Greater ChicagoFurther reading[edit]Davis, Richard H. (2009). A Priest's Guide for the Great Festival Aghorasiva's Mahotsavavidhi. Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-537852-0
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Vrata
Vrata
Vrata
is a Sanskrit
Sanskrit
word that means "vow, resolve, devotion",[1] and refers to pious observances such as fasting and pilgrimage (Tirtha) found in Indian religions such as
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Purushamedha
Purushamedha (or, 'Naramedha') is a Śrauta ritual of human sacrifice, closely related to the Ashvamedha.[1] The Vajasaneyi Samhita-Sataphana Brahmana-Katyayana Srauta Sutra sequence of White Yajur Veda texts contains the most details.[1] Whether actual human sacrifice was taking place has been debated since Colebrooke brought the issue under attention in 1805
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Satsang
Satsang / Satsanga / Satsangam is a word which comes from Sanskrit, meaning "to associate with true people", to be in the company of true people - sitting with a sat guru, or in a group meeting seeking that association. Inner satsang is to raise the consciousness to a level of realization that soul (atma) and Lord (Parmatma) are One.Contents1 Etymology 2 Definition 3 See also 4 References 5 Sources 6 External linksEtymology[edit] सत्सङ्ग (Sanskrit):Sat (Sanskrit) = true; see also Sacca, Sacha and Satyagraha Sangha
Sangha
(Sanskrit) = company or associationDefinition[edit] According to Liselotte Frisk, satsang is:.[1]..
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Pranayama
Prāṇāyāma (Sanskrit: प्राणायाम prāṇāyāma) is a Sanskrit
Sanskrit
word alternatively translated as "extension of the prāṇa (breath or life force)" or "breath control." The word is composed from two Sanskrit
Sanskrit
words: prana meaning life force (noted particularly as the breath), and either ayama (to restrain or control the prana, implying a set of breathing techniques where the breath is intentionally altered in order to produce specific results) or the negative form ayāma, meaning to extend or draw out (as in extension of the life force)
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Nadi (yoga)
Nāḍī (/ˈnɑːdi/; Sanskrit: नाडी, lit. 'tube, pipe'[1]; Tamil: நாடி, lit. 'nerve, blood vessel, pulse' ( listen)) is a term for the channels through which, in traditional Indian medicine and spiritual science, the energies of the physical body, the subtle body and the causal body are said to flow. Within this philosophical framework, the nadis are said to connect at special points of intensity called nadichakras.[2]Contents1 Introduction 2 Early references 3 Functions and activities3.1 Ida, Pingala and Sushumna4 Other traditions and interpretations4.1 Chinese 4.2 Tibetan 4.3 European5 See also 6 Notes and references 7 SourcesIntroduction[edit] Nadi is an important concept in Hindu philosophy, mentioned and described in the sources some of which have about 3,000 years of history. The amount of nadis of the human body are claimed to be up to hundred-of-thousands and even millions
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Wine
Wine
Wine
(from Latin
Latin
vinum) is an alcoholic beverage made from grapes, generally Vitis
Vitis
vinifera, fermented without the addition of sugars, acids, enzymes, water, or other nutrients.[1] Yeast consumes the sugar in the grapes and converts it to ethanol and carbon dioxide. Different varieties of grapes and strains of yeasts produce different styles of wine. These variations result from the complex interactions between the biochemical development of the grape, the reactions involved in fermentation, the terroir, and the production process. Many countries enact legal appellations intended to define styles and qualities of wine. These typically restrict the geographical origin and permitted varieties of grapes, as well as other aspects of wine production
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Amrita
Amrita
Amrita
(Sanskrit: अमृत, IAST: amṛta), Amrith or Amata, is a word that literally means "immortality" and is often referred to in texts as nectar. “Amṛta” is etymologically related to the Greek ambrosia[1] and carries the same meaning.[2] Its first occurrence is in the Rigveda, where it is considered one of several synonyms for soma, the drink of the devas. Amrit has varying significance in different Indian religions. The word Amrit is also a common first name for Sikhs and North Indian Hindus, while its feminine form is Amritā
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Arthur Avalon
Sir John George Woodroffe (1865–1936), also known by his pseudonym Arthur Avalon, was a British Orientalist whose work helped to unleash in the West a deep and wide interest in Hindu philosophy
Hindu philosophy
and Yogic practices.Contents1 Life 2 Sanskrit
Sanskrit
Studies 3 The Serpent Power and The Garland of Letters 4 Mahānirvāṇatantraṃ 5 Bibliography 6 See also 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksLife[edit] Sir John George Woodroffe was the eldest son of James Tisdall Woodroffe, Advocate-General of Bengal and sometime Legal Member of the Government of India, J. P., Kt. of St. Gregory, by his wife Florence, daughter of James Hume. He was born on 15 December 1865 and was educated at Woburn Park School and University College, Oxford, where he took second classes in jurisprudence and the B.C.L. (Bachelor of Civil Law) examinations
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Sir John Woodroffe
Sir John George Woodroffe (1865–1936), also known by his pseudonym Arthur Avalon, was a British Orientalist whose work helped to unleash in the West a deep and wide interest in Hindu philosophy
Hindu philosophy
and Yogic practices.Contents1 Life 2 Sanskrit
Sanskrit
Studies 3 The Serpent Power and The Garland of Letters 4 Mahānirvāṇatantraṃ 5 Bibliography 6 See also 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksLife[edit] Sir John George Woodroffe was the eldest son of James Tisdall Woodroffe, Advocate-General of Bengal and sometime Legal Member of the Government of India, J. P., Kt. of St. Gregory, by his wife Florence, daughter of James Hume. He was born on 15 December 1865 and was educated at Woburn Park School and University College, Oxford, where he took second classes in jurisprudence and the B.C.L. (Bachelor of Civil Law) examinations
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Dakṣiṇācāra
VedantaAdvaita Vishishtadvaita Dvaita Vedanta Bhedabheda Dvaitadvaita Achintya Bheda Abheda ShuddhadvaitaHeterodoxCharvaka Ājīvika Buddhism JainismOther schoolsVaishnava Smarta Shakta ĪśvaraShaiva: Pratyabhijña Pashupata SiddhantaTantraTeachers (Acharyas)NyayaAkṣapāda Gotama Jayanta Bhatta Raghunatha SiromaniMīmāṃsāJaimini Kumārila Bhaṭṭa PrabhākaraAdvaita VedantaGaudapada Adi Shankara Vācaspati Miśra Vidyaranya Sadananda Madhusūdana Sarasvatī Vijnanabhiksu Ramakrishna Vivekananda Ramana Maharshi Siddharudha Chinmayananda NisargadattaVishishtadvaitaNammalvar Alvars Yamunacharya Ramanuja Vedanta
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Taboo
A taboo is a vehement prohibition of an action based on the belief that such behavior is either too sacred or too accursed for ordinary individuals to undertake.[1][2] Such prohibitions are present in virtually all societies.[1] On a comparative basis taboos, for example related to food items, seem to make no sense at all as what may be declared unfit for one group by custom or religion may be perfectly acceptable to another. Whether scientifically correct or not, taboos are often meant to protect the human individual, but there are numerous other reasons for their existence. An ecological or medical background is apparent in many, including some that are seen as religious or spiritual in origin. Taboos can help utilize a resource more efficiently, but when applied to only a subsection of the community they can also serve to suppress a subsection of the community
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