HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

HMS Pickle
Eight ships of the Royal Navy
Royal Navy
have been named HMS Pickle:The first HMS Pickle (1800) was a 10-gun topsail schooner purchased in 1800, originally named Sting, and renamed in 1802. She was present at the Battle of Trafalgar
Battle of Trafalgar
in 1805 (but too small to play a part in the battle itself), under the command of John Richards Lapenotiere, who was entrusted with conveying the message about the victory and the death of Lord Nelson
Lord Nelson
to England. She landed in Falmouth, Cornwall, setting Lapenotiere on his historic 36-hour journey by post chaise to the Admiralty
Admiralty
in London. The route he took was inaugurated as The Trafalgar Way
Trafalgar Way
in 2005. She was wrecked in 1808 off Cádiz. The second Pickle was the 12-gun schooner Eclair, originally French, that Garland, a tender to Daphne, captured in 1801
[...More...]

"HMS Pickle" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Royal Navy
The Royal Navy
Navy
(RN) is the United Kingdom's naval warfare force. Although warships were used by the English kings from the early medieval period, the first major maritime engagements were fought in the Hundred Years War
Hundred Years War
against the Kingdom of France. The modern Royal Navy
Navy
traces its origins to the early 16th century; the oldest of the UK's armed services, it is known as the Senior Service. From the middle decades of the 17th century, and through the 18th century, the Royal Navy
Navy
vied with the Dutch Navy
Navy
and later with the French Navy
Navy
for maritime supremacy. From the mid 18th century, it was the world's most powerful navy until surpassed by the United States Navy
Navy
during the Second World War
[...More...]

"Royal Navy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Slave Trade
The history of slavery spans many cultures, nationalities, and religions from ancient times to the present day. However the social, economic, and legal positions of slaves were vastly different in different systems of slavery in different times and places.[1] Slavery
Slavery
can be traced back to the earliest records, such as the Mesopotamian
Mesopotamian
Code of Hammurabi
Code of Hammurabi
(c. 1860 BC), which refers to it as an established institution, and it was common among ancient peoples.[2] Slavery
Slavery
is rare among hunter-gatherer populations, because it is developed as a system of social stratification.[3][4] Slavery
Slavery
was known in the very first civilizations such as Sumer
Sumer
in Mesopotamia which dates back as far as 3500 BC, as well as in almost every other civilization
[...More...]

"Slave Trade" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

OCLC
OCLC, currently incorporated as OCLC
OCLC
Online Computer Library Center, Incorporated,[3] is an American nonprofit cooperative organization "dedicated to the public purposes of furthering access to the world's information and reducing information costs".[4] It was founded in 1967 as the Ohio College Library Center. OCLC
OCLC
and its member libraries cooperatively produce and maintain WorldCat, the largest online public access catalog (OPAC) in the world
[...More...]

"OCLC" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
[...More...]

"International Standard Book Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Ships Of The Royal Navy
Ships of the Royal Navy
Royal Navy
is a naval history reference work by J. J. Colledge (1908-1997); it provides brief entries on all recorded ships in commission in the British Royal Navy
Royal Navy
from the 15th century, giving location of constructions, date of launch, tonnage, specification and fate. It was published in two volumes by Greenhill Books. Volume 1, first published in 1969, covers major ships; Volume 2, first published in 1970, covers Navy-built trawlers, drifters, tugs and requisitioned ships including Armed Merchant Cruisers. The book is the standard single-volume reference work on ships of the Royal Navy, and Colledge's conventions and spellings of names are used by museums, libraries and archives. For more data on the ships of the pre-1863 British Navy, see British Warships in the Age of Sail. A revised third version of the Volume 1 work was published in 2003 which added the ships of the late 20th century
[...More...]

"Ships Of The Royal Navy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

J. J. Colledge
James Joseph Colledge (1908 – 26 April 1997)[1] was a British naval historian, author of Ships of the Royal Navy, the standard work on the fighting ships of the British Royal Navy
Royal Navy
from the 15th century to the 20th century. He also wrote Warships of World War II with Henry Trevor Lenton, listing Royal and Commonwealth warships. References[edit]^ World Ship Society obituary Archived 2011-09-30 at the Wayback Machine.External links[edit]Works by or about J. J. Colledge in libraries ( WorldCat
WorldCat
catalog)Authority control WorldCat
WorldCat
Identities VIAF: 62789134 ISNI: 0000 0000 6331 3777This article about a British historian or genealogist is a stub
[...More...]

"J. J. Colledge" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Ceylon
Coordinates: 7°N 81°E / 7°N 81°E / 7; 81Democratic Socialist Republic
Republic
of Sri Lanka ශ්‍රී ලංකා ප්‍රජාතාන්ත්‍රික සමාජවාදී ජනරජය (Sinhalese) Srī Lankā prajātāntrika samājavādī janarajaya இலங்கை ஜனநாயக சோசலிச குடியரசு (Tamil) Ilaṅkai jaṉanāyaka sōsalisa kuṭiyarasuFlagEmblemAnthem: "Sri
[...More...]

"Ceylon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Minesweeper
A minesweeper is a small naval warship designed to engage in minesweeping. Using various mechanisms intended to counter the threat posed by naval mines, waterways are maintained clear for safe shipping.[1]Contents1 History 2 Operation and requirements 3 Notable minesweepers 4 See also 5 Further reading 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] Although naval warfare has a long history, the earliest known usage of the naval mine dates to the Ming dynasty.[2] Dedicated minesweepers, however, only appear in the historical record several centuries later, to the Crimean War, where they were deployed by the British. In the Crimean War, minesweepers consisted of British rowboats trailing grapnels to snag the mines
[...More...]

"Minesweeper" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Gunboat
A gunboat is a naval watercraft designed for the express purpose of carrying one or more guns to bombard coastal targets, as opposed to those military craft designed for naval warfare, or for ferrying troops or supplies.Contents1 History1.1 Pre-steam era 1.2 Steam era 1.3 World War II1.3.1 United Kingdom 1.3.2 United States 1.3.3 Soviet Union1.4 Vietnam War2 See also 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Pre-steam era[edit] In the age of sail, a gunboat was usually a small undecked vessel carrying a single smoothbore cannon in the bow, or just two or three such cannons
[...More...]

"Gunboat" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Albacore-class Gunboat
Two classes of Royal Navy gunboat have been named Albacore-class gunboats:Albacore-class gunboat (1855) Albacore-class gunboat (1883)This article includes a list of ships with the same or similar names. If an internal link for a specific ship led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended ship artic
[...More...]

"Albacore-class Gunboat" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Mortar (weapon)
A mortar is an indirect fire device that launches projectiles at ranges from 70 meters to 14,000 meters. The mortar has traditionally been used as a weapon to propel explosive shells called mortar rounds in high-arcing ballistic trajectories. The weapon is typically muzzle-loading with a short, often smooth-bore barrel, generally less than 15 times its caliber. Modern mortars are light and easily portable. They can be used for close fire support with a variety of ammunition.Contents1 History1.1 Origins 1.2 Modern portable mortar 1.3 Largest mortars 1.4 Improvised mortars2 Function 3 Design3.1 Distinctive features of mortars 3.2 Spigot mortar 3.3 Gun-mortars4 Images 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] Origins[edit] Mortars have been used for hundreds of years, originally in siege warfare. Many historians consider the first mortars to have been used at the 1453 siege of Constantinople by Mehmed the Conqueror
[...More...]

"Mortar (weapon)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Cuba
Coordinates: 22°00′N 80°00′W / 22.000°N 80.000°W / 22.000; -80.000Republic of Cuba República de Cuba  (Spanish)FlagCoat of armsMotto:  "¡Patria o Muerte, Venceremos!" (Spanish) "Homeland or Death, we shall overcome!"[1]Anthem: La Bayamesa Bayamo
Bayamo
Song [2]Location of  Cuba  (green)Capital and largest city Havana 23°8′N 82°23′W / 23.133°N 82.383°W / 23.133; -82.383Official languages SpanishEthnic groups (2012[3])64.1% White 26.6% Mulatto, Mest
[...More...]

"Cuba" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Slave Ship
A slave ship is a vessel used to transport slaves. Slave Ship may also refer to:The Slave Ship, a painting by J. M. W. Turner Slave Ship (Jeter novel), a 1998 science fiction novel by K. W
[...More...]

"Slave Ship" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Falmouth, Cornwall
Falmouth (/ˈfælməθ/ or /ˈfɔːlməθ/ or /ˈfʌlməθ/; Cornish: Aberfala)[2] is a town, civil parish and port on the River Fal
River Fal
on the south coast of Cornwall, England, United Kingdom.[3] It has a total resident population of 21,797 (2011 census).[4]Contents1 History1.1 Early history 1.2 19th and 20th centuries 1.3 Historic estates2 Governance 3 Economy, industry and tourism 4 Culture 5 Transport5.1 Falmouth harbour 5.2 Road 5.3 Railway6 Education 7 Sport and recreation 8 Notable people8.1 Early times to 1780 8.2 1780 to 1810 8.3 1810 to 1850 8.4 1850 to 1910 8.5 1910 to present 8.6 Sport9 Landmarks 10 Twinning 11 See also 12 Further reading 13 References 14 External linksHistory[edit] See also: Miss Susan Gay's Falmouth chronology The name Falmouth is of English origin
[...More...]

"Falmouth, Cornwall" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.