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Juliana Horatia Ewing
Juliana Horatia Ewing (née Gatty, 3 August 1841 – 13 May 1885) was an English writer of children's literature, children's stories. Her writings display a sympathetic insight into children's lives, an admiration for things military, and a strong religious faith. Life Known as Julie, she was the second of ten children of the Alfred Gatty, Rev. Alfred Gatty, Vicar of Ecclesfield in Yorkshire, and Margaret Gatty, who was herself a children's author. Their children were educated mainly by their mother, but Julie was often the driving force behind their various activities: drama, botany and so on. Later she was responsible for setting up a village library in Ecclesfield and helped out in the parish with her three sisters. Early stories of hers appeared in Charlotte Mary Yonge's magazine ''The Monthly Packet''. On 1 June 1867, Julie married Major Alexander Ewing (composer), Alexander Ewing (1830–1895) of the Royal Army Pay Corps, Army Pay Corps. A musician, composer and translator ...
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Infobox writer may be used to summarize information about a person who is a writer/author (includes screenwriters). If the writer-specific fields here are not needed, consider using the more general ; other infoboxes there can be found in :People and person infobox templates. This template may also be used as a module (or sub-template) of ; see WikiProject Infoboxes/embed for guidance on such usage. Syntax The infobox may be added by pasting the template as shown below into an article. All fields are optional. Any unused parameter names can be left blank or omitted. Parameters Please remove any parameters from an article's infobox that are unlikely to be used. All parameters are optional. Unless otherwise specified, if a parameter has multiple values, they should be comma-separated using the template: : which produces: : , language= If any of the individual values contain commas already, add to use semi-colons as separators: : which produces: : , pseudo ...
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New Brunswick
("Hope restored") , image_map = New Brunswick in Canada 2.svg , Label_map = yes , coordinates = , capital = Fredericton Fredericton (; ) is the capital city of the Canadian province The provinces and territories of Canada are sub-national divisions within the geographical areas of Canada Canada is a country in the northern part of North America. Its P ... , largest_city = Moncton Moncton (; ) is the largest urban centre in the Provinces and territories of Canada, Canadian province of New Brunswick. Situated in the Petitcodiac River Valley, Moncton lies at the geographic centre of the The Maritimes, Maritime Provinces. T ... , largest_metro = Greater Moncton Greater Moncton () is the area encompassing Metro Moncton (Moncton, Riverview, New Brunswick, Riverview, and Dieppe, New Brunswick, Dieppe). Greater Moncton is also known as Greater Moncton Census Metropolitan Area, Moncton ...
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Monthly Packet
''The Monthly Packet'' was an English magazine published between 1851 and 1899, founded by members of the Oxford Movement to counter Anglo-Catholic extremism. It was strongly influenced by its first editor, the novelist Charlotte Mary Yonge, with aims of providing instruction, entertainment and improvement. Other, unstated aims were to encourage interest in education, missionary work, and charity. Content changes ''The Monthly Packet of Evening Readings for Younger Members of the English Church'', as shown in "The Introductory Letter" in Volume 1, was targeted at middle and upper-class Anglican girls. Evidence suggests readership actually included males, adults and members of the lower classes. (By July, 1880, the word "Younger" had been dropped from the title.) The magazine encouraged attitudes that included the prevailing view of religious and social standards. Over time, the approach was modified: Anglo-Catholic contributions were accepted, and it became more tolerant of Roman Ca ...
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Randolph Caldecott
Randolph Caldecott (; 22 March 1846 – 12 February 1886) was a British artist and illustrator, born in Chester. The Caldecott Medal was named in his honour. He exercised his art chiefly in book illustrations. His abilities as an artist were promptly and generously recognised by the Royal Academy. Caldecott greatly influenced illustration of children's books during the nineteenth century. Two books illustrated by him, priced at a shilling each, were published every Christmas for eight years. Caldecott also illustrated novels and accounts of foreign travel, made humorous drawings depicting hunting and fashionable life, drew cartoons and he made sketches of the Palace of Westminster, Houses of Parliament inside and out, and exhibited sculptures and paintings in oil and watercolour in the Royal Academy and galleries. Early life Caldecott was born at 150 Bridge Street (now No 16), Chester, where his father, John Caldecott, was an accountant, twice married with thirteen children. Cal ...
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George Cruikshank
George Cruikshank (27 September 1792 – 1 February 1878) was a British caricaturist A caricaturist is an artist who specializes in drawing caricatures.https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/caricaturist List of caricaturists * Abed Abdi (born 1942) * Al Hirschfeld (1903–2003) * Alex Gard (1900–1948) * Alexander ... and book illustrator, praised as the "modern Hogarth" during his life. His book illustrations for his friend Charles Dickens Charles John Huffam Dickens (; 7 February 1812 – 9 June 1870) was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world's best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian e ..., and many other authors, reached an international audience. Early life Cruikshank was born in London. His father, Edinburgh Edinburgh (; sco, Edinburgh; gd, Dùn Èideann ) is the capital city A capital or capital city is the holding primary status in a , , ...
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A Flat Iron For A Farthing
''A Flat Iron for a Farthing'' (1872) is a book by Juliana Horatia Ewing (1842-1885) and consists of childhood reminiscences of the only child of a Widower, widowed father. It was one of the author's most popular books. References

* Humphrey Carpenter and Mari Prichard. ''Oxford Companion to Children's Literature''. Oxford University Press, 1997. * Jack Zipes (ed) et al. ''The Norton Anthology of Children's Literature: The Traditions in English.'' W. W. Norton, 2005. * Jack Zipes (ed.). ''The Oxford Encyclopedia of Children's Literature. Volumes 1-4''. Oxford University Press, 2006. * Victor Watson, ''The Cambridge Guide to Children's Books in English''. Cambridge University Press, 2001. 1872 British novels 19th-century British children's literature British children's novels 1870s children's books {{1870s-child-novel-stub ...
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Church Of England
The Church of England (C of E) is a Christian church Christian Church is a Protestant Protestantism is a form of Christianity that originated with the 16th-century Reformation, a movement against what its followers perceived to be Criticism of the Catholic Church, errors in the Catholic Church. ... which is the established church A state religion (also called an established religion or official religion) is a religion Religion is a social Social organisms, including humans, live collectively in interacting populations. This interaction is considered social whether ... of England England is a that is part of the . It shares land borders with to its west and to its north. The lies northwest of England and the to the southwest. England is separated from by the to the east and the to the south. The country cover .... The archbishop of Canterbury The Archbishop of Canterbury is the senior bishop A bishop is an ordained, consecrated, or appo ...
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Oxford University Press
Oxford University Press (OUP) is the university press A university press is an academic publishing Publishing is the activity of making information, literature, music, software and other content available to the public for sale or for free. Traditionally, the term refers to the distribution of pri ... of the University of Oxford The University of Oxford is a collegiate university, collegiate research university in Oxford, England. There is evidence of teaching as early as 1096, making it the oldest university in the English-speaking world and the List of oldest universit .... It is the largest university press in the world, and the second oldest after Cambridge University Press Cambridge University Press (CUP) is the publishing business of the University of Cambridge , mottoeng = Literal: From here, light and sacred draughts. Non literal: From this place, we gain enlightenment and precious knowled .... It is a department of the University of Oxf ...
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English Literature
Literature written in the English language English is a West Germanic language of the Indo-European language family The Indo-European languages are a language family A language is a structured system of communication used by humans, including speech ( spoken language), g ... includes many countries such as the United Kingdom The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom (UK) or Britain,Usage is mixed. The Guardian' and Telegraph' use Britain as a synonym for the United Kingdom. Some prefer to use Britain as shorth ... and its crown dependencies, Republic of Ireland Ireland ( ga, Éire ), also known as the Republic of Ireland ('), is a country in north-western Europe consisting of 26 of the 32 Counties of Ireland, counties of the island of Ireland. The capital and largest city is Dublin, on the eastern ..., the United States, and the countries of the former British Empire The British Empi ...
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Roger Lancelyn Green
Roger Gilbert Lancelyn Green (2 November 1918 – 8 October 1987) was a British biographer and children's writer. He was an Oxford academic who formed part of the Inklings literary discussion group along with C. S. Lewis and J. R. R. Tolkien. Biography Roger Lancelyn Green was born in 1918 in Norwich, England, to Major Gilbert Arthur Lancelyn Green (1887–1947), of the Royal Artillery, and Helena Mary Phyllis, daughter of Lt-Col Charles William Henry Sealy, of Hambledon House, Hampshire. The landed gentry Lancelyn Green family can be traced back to 1093, with the marriage of Randle Greene (sic) and Elizabeth, daughter of William Lancelyn, taking place in the reign of Elizabeth I of England, Elizabeth I.Burke's Landed Gentry, 18th ed., vol. 3, ed. Hugh Montgomery-Massingberd, 1972, 'Lancelyn Green of Poulton-Lancelyn' pedigree He studied under C. S. Lewis at Merton College, Oxford, where he obtained a British degree abbreviations#Bachelor's degrees, B.Litt. degree. As an unde ...
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Gillian Avery
Gillian Elise Avery (30 September 1926 – 31 January 2016) was a British children's novelist, and a historian of childhood education and children's literature. She won the Guardian Children's Fiction Prize in 1972, for ''A Likely Lad.'' It was film adaptation, adapted for television in 1990. Life Gillian Avery was born in Reigate, Surrey, and attended Dunottar School there. She worked first as a journalist on the ''Surrey Mirror'', then for Chambers's Encyclopaedia and Oxford University Press. In 1952 she married the literary scholar A. O. J. Cockshut, with whom she moved to Manchester, returning to Oxford in 1966. She is the author of several studies of the history of education and of children's literature, and that scholarly interest is reflected in her own books for children, which are set in Victorian England. The first, ''The Warden's Niece'' (1957), is a witty adventure story in which Maria runs away from her stultifying boarding school to live with her great-uncle, ...
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Trull
Trull is a village, electoral ward A ward is a local authority area, typically used for electoral purposes. In some countries, wards are usually named after neighbourhoods, thoroughfares, parishes, landmarks, geographical features and in some cases historical figures connected to t ... and civil parish In England, a civil parish is a type of administrative parish used for local government Local government is a generic term for the lowest tiers of public administration Public administration is the implementation of public policy, gove ... in Somerset ( en, All The People of Somerset) , locator_map = , coordinates = , region = South West England South West England is one of nine official regions of England The regions, formerly known as the government office regions, are the ..., England, situated near Taunton Taunton () is the county town of Somerset, England, with a 2011 population of 69,570. Its thousand-year history includes a 10th-cen ...
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