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Bartizan
A bartizan (an alteration of ''bratticing''), also called a guerite, ''garita'', or ''échauguette'', or spelled bartisan, is an overhanging, wall-mounted turret upTurret (highlighted in red) attached to a tower on a baronial building in Scotland In architecture upright=1.45, alt=Plan d'exécution du second étage de l'hôtel de Brionne (dessin) De Cotte 2503c – Gallica 2011 (adjusted), Plan o ... projecting from the walls of late medieval and early-modern fortification A fortification is a military construction or building designed for the defense of territories in warfare, and is also used to establish rule in a region during peacetime. The term is derived from Latin ''fortis'' ("strong") and ''facere'' ( ...s from the early 14th century up to the 18th century. Most frequently found at corners, they protected a warder and enabled him to see his surroundings. Bartizans generally are furnished with oillets or arrow slit. This shows the inside - where the arc ...
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Belém Tower
Belém Tower ( pt, Torre de Belém, links=no, ), officially the Tower of Vincent of Saragossa, Saint Vincent ( pt, Torre de São Vicente, links=no) is a 16th-century fortification located in Lisbon that served as a point of embarkation and disembarkation for Portuguese explorers and as a ceremonial gateway to Lisbon. It was built during the height of the Portuguese Renaissance, and is a prominent example of the Portuguese Manueline style, but it also incorporates hints of other architectural styles. The structure was built from lioz limestone and is composed of a bastion and a , four-storey tower. Since 1983, the tower has been a UNESCO World Heritage Site, along with the Jerónimos Monastery. It is often portrayed as a symbol of Europe's Age of Discoveries and as a metonym for Portugal or Lisbon, given its landmark status. It has incorrectly been stated that the tower was built in the middle of the Tagus and now sits near the shore because the river was redirected after the 1 ...
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Bartizan (PSF)
A bartizan (an alteration of ''bratticing''), also called a guerite, ''garita'', or ''échauguette'', or spelled bartisan, is an overhanging, wall-mounted turret projecting from the walls of late medieval and early-modern fortifications from the early 14th century up to the 18th century. Most frequently found at corners, they protected a warder and enabled him to see his surroundings. Bartizans generally are furnished with Architectural glossary#O, oillets or arrow slits. The turret was usually supported by stepped masonry corbels and could be round, polygonal or square. Bartizans were incorporated into many notable examples of Scottish Baronial architecture. In the architecture of Aberdeen, the new Town House, built in 1868–74, incorporates bartizans in the West Tower. Gallery At walls File:Round Bartizan, Fortaleza de Santiago, Sesimbra, Portugal.JPG, ''Guarita'' at Fortaleza de Santiago, Sesimbra Municipality, Portugal. File:Sudika Isla watchtower.jpg, ''Gardjola'' at ...
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Feartagar Castle
Feartagar Castle, also called Jennings Castle, is a Tower houses in Britain and Ireland, tower house and National Monument (Ireland), National Monument located in County Galway, Republic of Ireland, Ireland. Location Feartagar Castle lies on a hill east of Kilconly and northwest of Tuam, near to the River Nanny (County Galway), River Nanny. History The tower house was built in the 15th–17th century by the House of Burke, de Burgos (Burkes, de Búrca). Descendants of William de Burgh (c. 1160 – 1205/06), Anglo-Norman knight and close friend of John Lackland, King John, the Burkes ruled in Connacht for centuries. They were dispossessed in 1651 by the Cromwellian conquest of Ireland. The castle later came into the possession of the Blakes of Tuam, and then the Jennings. Description A five-storey tower house, 12 × 10 m at base (39 × 33 ft). Features include round bartizans on each corner, a machicolation above the doorway and a latrine chute. The second floor is vaul ...
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Architecture Of Aberdeen
The architecture of Aberdeen, Scotland, is known for the use of granite Granite () is a coarse-grained (phanerite, phaneritic) intrusive rock, intrusive igneous rock composed mostly of quartz, alkali feldspar, and plagioclase. It forms from magma with a high content of silica and alkali metal oxides that slowly cool ... as the principal construction material. The stone, which has been quarried in and around the city, has given Aberdeen Aberdeen (; sco, Aiberdeen, ; gd, Obar Dheathain ; la, Aberdonia) is a city in northeast Scotland. It is the List of towns and cities in Scotland by population, third most populous city in Scotland, one of Scotland's 32 Local government in ... the epithet ''The Granite City'', or more romantically, and less commonly used, the ''Silver City'', after the mica Micas ( ) are a group of mineral In geology and mineralogy, a mineral or mineral species is, broadly speaking, a solid chemical compound with a fairly well-defined chem ...
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Fort De Chartres
Fort de Chartres was a French French (french: français(e), link=no) may refer to: * Something of, from, or related to France France (), officially the French Republic (french: link=no, République française), is a transcontinental country This is a list of co ... fortification A fortification is a military construction or building designed for the defense of territories in warfare, and is also used to establish rule in a region during peacetime. The term is derived from Latin ''fortis'' ("strong") and ''facere'' ( ... first built in 1720 on the east bank of the Mississippi River The Mississippi River is the second-longest river and chief river A river is a natural flowing watercourse, usually freshwater, flowing towards an ocean, sea, lake or another river. In some cases, a river flows into the ground and b ... in present-day Illinois Illinois ( ) is a state State may refer to: Arts, entertainment, and media Literature * ''Sta ...
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Turret
In architecture upright=1.45, alt=Plan d'exécution du second étage de l'hôtel de Brionne (dessin) De Cotte 2503c – Gallica 2011 (adjusted), Plan of the second floor (attic storey) of the Hôtel de Brionne in Paris – 1734. Architecture (Latin ''archi ..., a turret (from Italian Italian may refer to: * Anything of, from, or related to the country and nation of Italy ** Italians, an ethnic group or simply a citizen of the Italian Republic ** Italian language, a Romance language *** Regional Italian, regional variants of the ...: ''torretta'', little tower; Latin Latin (, or , ) is a classical language belonging to the Italic languages, Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. Latin was originally spoken in the area around Rome, known as Latium. Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became ...: ''turris'', tower) is a small tower A tower is a tall structure A structure is an arrangement and organization of interrelated elements in a material ...
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Greenknowe Tower
Greenknowe Tower is a 16th-century tower house, located just west of the village of Gordon, Scottish Borders, Gordon, in the Scottish Borders. Although a roofless ruin, the stonework of the tower is well preserved, and represents a fine example of a later tower house, built more as a residence rather than as a place of defence. The building is located at , beside the A6105 road. It is a Scheduled Ancient Monument, and is in the care of Historic Scotland. History The lands of Greenknowe were obtained by the Setons of Touch House, Touch in the early 15th century, when Alexander Seton married a Clan Gordon, Gordon heiress. The tower was built in 1581 by James Seton, and the date, his initials, and the initials of his wife Janet Edmonstone, are inscribed above the door. The castle is situated on a low natural mound, which was originally surrounded and defended by marshy ground. In the 17th century, the tower was sold to the Clan Pringle, Pringles of Stichill, who made additions to the ...
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Scottish Baronial Architecture
Scottish baronial or Scots baronial is an architectural style An architectural style is a set of characteristics and features that make a building or other structure notable or historically identifiable. It is a sub-class of Style (visual arts), style in the visual arts generally, and most styles in archite ... of 19th century Gothic Revival Gothic Revival (also referred to as Victorian Gothic, neo-Gothic, or Gothick) is an Architectural style, architectural movement that began in the late 1740s in England. The movement gained momentum and expanded in the first half of the 19th cent ... which revived the forms and ornaments of historical architecture of Scotland in the Late Middle Ages and the Early Modern Period The early modern period of modern history Human history, or world history, is the narrative of Human, humanity's past. It is understood through archaeology, anthropology, genetics, and linguistics, and since the History of writing, adve .... Reminisce ...
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Castillo San Cristóbal (San Juan)
Castillo San Cristóbal,www.nps.gov
National Park Service - San Juan National Historic Site - The Gibraltar of the Caribbean - Consulted el 2014-11-29
is a fortress in San Juan, Puerto Rico, San Juan, Puerto Rico. It was built by the Spain, Spanish to protect against land based attacks on the city of San Juan. It is part of San Juan National Historic Site. Castillo San Cristóbal is the largest fortification built by the Spanish in the New World. When it was finished in 1783, it covered about 27 acres of land and partly encircled the city of San Juan. Entry to the city was sealed by San Cristóbal's double gates. After close to a hundred years of relative peace in the area, part of the fortification (about a third) was demolished in 1897 to help ease the flow of traffic in and out of the walled city. This fortress was built on a hill originally known as ...
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Ireland
Ireland ( ; ga, Éire ; Ulster Scots dialect, Ulster-Scots: ) is an island in the Atlantic Ocean, North Atlantic. It is separated from Great Britain to its east by the North Channel (Great Britain and Ireland), North Channel, the Irish Sea, and St George's Channel. Ireland is the List of islands of the British Isles, second-largest island of the British Isles, the List of European islands by area, third-largest in Europe, and the List of islands by area, twentieth-largest on Earth. Geopolitically, Ireland is divided between the Republic of Ireland (officially Names of the Irish state, named Ireland), which covers five-sixths of the island, and Northern Ireland, which is part of the United Kingdom. In 2011, the Irish population analysis, population of Ireland was about 6.6 million, ranking it the List of European islands by population, second-most populous island in Europe after Great Britain. As of 2016, 4.8 million lived in the Republic of Ireland, and 1.8 m ...
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Fortification
A fortification is a military A military, also known collectively as armed forces, is a heavily armed, highly organized force primarily intended for warfare War is an intense armed conflict between State (polity), states, governments, Society, societies, or pa ... construction Construction is a general term meaning the and to form , , or ,"Construction" def. 1.a. 1.b. and 1.c. ''Oxford English Dictionary'' Second Edition on CD-ROM (v. 4.0) Oxford University Press 2009 and comes from ''constructio'' (from ''com-' ... or building A building, or edifice, is a structure with a roof and walls standing more or less permanently in one place, such as a house A house is a single-unit residential building, which may range in complexity from a rudimentary hut to a complex st ... designed for the defense of territories in war War is an intense armed conflict between states State may refer to: Arts, entertainment, and media Literature * '' ...
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Lisbon
Lisbon (; pt, Lisboa ) is the capital and the largest city of Portugal, with an estimated population of 544,851 within its administrative limits in an area of 100.05 km2. Grande Lisboa, Lisbon's urban area extends beyond the city's administrative limits with a population of around 2.7 million people, being the Largest urban areas of the European Union, 11th-most populous urban area in the European Union.Demographia: World Urban Areas
- demographia.com, 06.2021
About 2.9 million people live in the Lisbon metropolitan area, which represents approximately 27% of the country's population.Diário da República, 1.ª s ...
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