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The Info List - Christy Mathewson


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As player

New York Giants (1900–1916) Cincinnati Reds
Cincinnati Reds
(1916)

As manager

Cincinnati Reds
Cincinnati Reds
(1916–1918)

Career highlights and awards

World Series
World Series
champion (1905, 1921) 2× Triple Crown (1905, 1908) 4× NL wins leader (1905, 1907, 1908, 1910) 5× NL ERA leader (1905, 1908, 1909, 1911, 1913) 5× NL strikeout leader (1903–1905, 1907, 1908) Pitched two no-hitters Name honored by the Giants Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
All-Century Team

Member of the National

Baseball
Baseball
Hall of Fame

Induction 1936

Vote 90.7% (first ballot)

Christy Mathewson

Career information

Position(s) Fullback

College Bucknell

High school Keystone Academy

Career history

As player

1898 Greensburg A. A.

1902 Pittsburgh Stars

Career highlights and awards

Pittsburgh Stars
Pittsburgh Stars
1902 Championship team

Military career

Allegiance United States

Service/branch U.S. Army

Years of service 1918–1919

Rank Captain

Unit Chemical Warfare Service 1st Gas Regiment

Battles/wars World War I Western Front

Christopher Mathewson (August 12, 1880 – October 7, 1925), nicknamed "Big Six", "The Christian
Christian
Gentleman", "Matty", and "The Gentleman's Hurler", was a Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
(MLB) right-handed pitcher who played 17 seasons with the New York Giants. He was among the most dominant pitchers in baseball history, and ranks in the all-time top ten in several key pitching categories, including wins, shutouts, and ERA.[1] In fact, he is the only professional pitcher in history to rank in the top ten both in career wins and in career ERA, if taking 19th century pitchers statistics into account.[2] Otherwise, Mathewson and Walter Johnson
Walter Johnson
would hold the distinction of being the only two pitchers ranked in both the top ten in career wins and career ERA.[3] In 1936, Mathewson was elected into the Baseball
Baseball
Hall of Fame, as one of its first five members. Mathewson grew up in Factoryville, Pennsylvania, and began playing semiprofessional baseball when he was 14 years old. He played in the minor leagues in 1899, recording a record of 21 wins and two losses. He pitched for the New York Giants the next season but was sent back to the minors. He would eventually return to the Giants and go on to win 373 games in his career, a National League
National League
record. He led the Giants to victory in the 1905 World Series
World Series
by pitching three shutouts. Mathewson never pitched on Sundays, owing to his Christian
Christian
beliefs. Mathewson served in the United States
United States
Army's Chemical Warfare Service in World War I, and was accidentally exposed to chemical weapons during training. His respiratory system was weakened from the exposure, causing him to contract tuberculosis, from which he died in Saranac Lake, New York
Saranac Lake, New York
in 1925.

Contents

1 Early life 2 Professional career

2.1 Minor league career & early major league career 2.2 Football career 2.3 Career with the Giants 2.4 Three years with the Reds

3 Personal life and literary career 4 World War I and afterward 5 Death and legacy 6 Baseball
Baseball
honors 7 Filmography 8 See also 9 Notes 10 References 11 Works 12 External links

Early life[edit] Mathewson was born in Factoryville, Pennsylvania
Factoryville, Pennsylvania
and attended high school at Keystone Academy. He attended college at Bucknell University, where he served as class president and played on the school's football and baseball teams.[4] He was also a member of the fraternity of Phi Gamma Delta.[5] His first experience of semiprofessional baseball came in 1895, when he was just 14 years old.[6] The manager of the Factoryville ball club asked him to pitch in a game with a rival team in Mill City, Pennsylvania.[6] Mathewson helped his hometown team to a 19-17 victory, but with his batting rather than his pitching.[6] He continued to play baseball during his years at Bucknell, pitching for minor league teams in Honesdale and Meridian, Pennsylvania.[7] Mathewson was selected to the Walter Camp All- American football
American football
team in 1900. He was a drop-kicker.[8] Professional career[edit] Minor league career & early major league career[edit]

Mathewson warming up as a New York Giant in 1910

In 1899, Mathewson signed to play professional baseball with Taunton of the New England League. The next season, he moved on to play on the Norfolk team of the Virginia-North Carolina League. He finished that season with a 20–2 record.[9] He continued to attend Bucknell during that time period. In July of that year, the New York Giants purchased his contract from Norfolk for $1,500 ($44,124 in current dollar terms).[9][10] Between July and September 1900 Mathewson appeared in six games for the Giants. He started one of those games and compiled a 0–3 record. Displeased with his performance, the Giants returned him to Norfolk and demanded their money back.[9] Later that month, the Cincinnati Reds picked up Mathewson off the Norfolk roster. On December 15, 1900, the Reds quickly traded Mathewson back to the Giants for Amos Rusie.[10] Football career[edit] Mathewson played football at Keystone College
Keystone College
from 1895 to 1897.[11] He turned pro in 1898, appearing as a fullback with the Greensburg Athletic Association.[12] While a member of the New York Giants, Mathewson played fullback for the Pittsburgh Stars
Pittsburgh Stars
of the first National Football League. However, Mathewson disappeared from the team in the middle of the team's 1902 season. Some historians speculate that the Giants got word that their star pitcher was risking his life and baseball career for the Stars and ordered him to stop, while others feel that the Stars' coach, Willis Richardson, got rid of Mathewson because he felt that, since the fullback's punting skills were hardly used, he could replace him with a local player, Shirley Ellis.[13] Career with the Giants[edit]

Mathewson in his New York Giants uniform

During his 17-year career, Mathewson won 373 games and lost 188 for a .665 winning percentage. His career ERA of 2.13 and 79 career shutouts are among the best all time for pitchers, and his 373 wins is still number one in the National League, tied with Grover Cleveland Alexander. He employed a good fastball, outstanding control, and, especially, a new pitch he termed the "fadeaway" (later known in baseball as the "screwball"), which he learned from teammate Dave Williams in 1898.[14] This reference is challenged by Ken Burns documentary Baseball
Baseball
in which it is stated that Mathewson learned his "fadeaway" from Andrew "Rube" Foster when New York Giants manager John Joseph McGraw quietly hired Rube to show the Giants bullpen what he knew. Many baseball historians consider this story apocryphal.[15][better source needed] Mathewson recorded 2,507 career strikeouts against only 848 walks. He is famous for his 25 pitching duels with Mordecai "Three Finger" Brown, who won 13 of the duels against Mathewson's 11, with one no-decision.[16] From 1900 to 1904, Mathewson established himself as a premier pitcher. Posting low ERAs and winning nearly 100 games, Mathewson helped McGraw raise the Giants' place in the standings. Though no World Series
World Series
was held in 1904, the Giants captured the pennant, prompting McGraw to proclaim them as the best team in the world. Mathewson strove even harder in 1905. After switching to catcher, Roger Bresnahan
Roger Bresnahan
had begun collaborating with Mathewson, whose advanced memory of hitter weaknesses paved the way for a historic season. Pinpoint control guided Mathewson's pitches to Bresnahan's glove. In 338 innings, Mathewson walked only 64 batters. He shut out opposing teams eight times, pitching entire games in brief 90-minute sessions. Besides winning 31 games, Mathewson allowed only 1.28 earned runs for every nine innings. His 206 strikeouts led the league, earning him the Triple Crown.[17] Mathewson's Giants won the 1905 World Series
World Series
over the Philadelphia Athletics. Mathewson was the starting pitcher in Game 1, and pitched a 4-hit shutout for the victory. Three days later, with the series tied 1–1, he pitched another 4-hit shutout. Then, two days later in Game 5, he threw a 6-hit shutout to clinch the series for the Giants. In a span of only six days, Mathewson had pitched three complete games without allowing a run while giving up only 14 hits. In the next year, Mathewson lost much of his edge, owing to an early season diagnosis of diphtheria. McGraw pulled over 260 innings from him, but these were plagued with struggle. Though he maintained a 22-12 record, his 2.97 ERA was well above the league average of 2.62. His 1.271 WHIP, quite uncharacteristic of him, was due to an increased amount of hits and walks.

Mathewson with the New York Giants, c. 1913

By 1908, Mathewson was back on top as the league's elite pitcher. Winning the most games of his career, 37, coupled with a 1.43 ERA and 259 strikeouts, he claimed a second Triple Crown. He also led the league in innings pitched and shutouts, and held hitters to an exceptionally low 0.827 WHIP. Unfortunately, the Giants were unable to take home the pennant due to what was ultimately known as Merkle's Boner, an incident that cost the Giants a crucial game against the Chicago Cubs, who eventually defeated the Giants in the standings by one game. Mathewson returned for an incredible 1909 season, posting better numbers than the previous year. He repeated a strong performance in 1910 and then again in 1911 when the Giants captured their first pennant since 1905. The Giants ultimately lost the 1911 World Series to the Philadelphia Athletics, the same team they had defeated for the 1905 championship. Mathewson and Rube Marquard
Rube Marquard
allowed two game-winning home runs to Hall of Famer Frank Baker, earning him the nickname, "Home Run."[17] In 1912 Mathewson gave another stellar performance. Capturing the pennant, the Giants were fueled by the stolen-base game and a superior pitching staff capped by Rube Marquard, the "11,000-dollar lemon" who turned around to win 26 games, 19 of them consecutively. In the 1912 World Series, the Giants faced the Boston Red Sox, the 1904 American League pennant winners who were to face the Giants in the World Series that year had it not been canceled. Though Mathewson threw three complete games and maintained an ERA below 1.00, numerous errors by the Giants, including a lazy popup dropped by Fred Snodgrass in game 7, cost them the championship.[18] The Giants would also lose the 1913 World Series, a 101-win season cemented by Mathewson's final brilliant season on the mound: a league-leading 2.06 ERA in over 300 innings pitched complemented by a microscopic 0.6 bases on balls per nine innings pitched. For the remainder of his career with the Giants, Mathewson began to struggle. Soon the former champions fell into decline. In 1915, Mathewson's penultimate season in New York, the Giants were the worst team in the National League
National League
standings. Mathewson, who had expressed interest in serving as a manager, wound up with a three-year deal to manage the Cincinnati Reds
Cincinnati Reds
effective July 21, 1916.[17] Three years with the Reds[edit]

Mathewson in 1904

On July 20, 1916, Mathewson's career came full circle when he was traded to the Cincinnati Reds
Cincinnati Reds
along with Edd Roush. He was immediately named as the Reds' player-manager. However, he appeared in only one game as a pitcher for the Reds, on September 4, 1916. He faced Brown in the second half of a doubleheader, which was billed as the final meeting between the two old baseball warriors. The high-scoring game was a win for Mathewson's Reds over Brown's Cubs, 10-8.[19] Mathewson retired after the season and managed the Reds for the entire 1917 season and the first 118 games of 1918, compiling a total record of 164-176 as a manager.[19] Personal life and literary career[edit] Mathewson married wife Jane in 1903. Their only son Christopher Jr. was born shortly after. Christy Mathewson
Christy Mathewson
Jr. served in WWII, and died in an explosion at his home in Texas in 1950. During Mathewson's playing years, the family lived in a duplex in upper Manhattan alongside Mathewson's manager John McGraw
John McGraw
and his wife Blanche. Mathewson and McGraw remained friends for the entirety of their lives. In the 1909 offseason, Christy Mathewson's younger brother Nicholas Mathewson committed suicide in a neighbor's barn. Another brother, Henry Mathewson, pitched briefly for the Giants before dying of tuberculosis in 1917. Mathewson was highly regarded in the baseball world during his lifetime. As he was a clean-cut, intellectual collegiate, his rise to fame brought a better name to the typical ballplayer, who usually spent his time gambling, boozing, or womanizing. As noted in The National League
National League
Story (1961) by Lee Allen, Mathewson was a devout Christian
Christian
and never pitched on Sunday, a promise he made to his mother that brought him popularity amongst the more religious New York fans. However, the impact of this practice on the Giants was minimized, since, in the eight-team National League, only the Chicago Cubs (Illinois), Cincinnati Reds
Cincinnati Reds
(Ohio), and St. Louis Cardinals
St. Louis Cardinals
(Missouri) played home games in states that allowed professional sports on Sunday. In his free time, Mathewson enjoyed nature walks, reading, golf, and checkers, of which he was a renowned champion player. The combination of athletic skill and intellectual hobbies made him a favorite for many fans, even those opposed to the Giants. Sportswriters praised him, and in his prime every game he started began with deafening cheers. Sometimes the distraction prompted him to walk out ten minutes after his fielders took the field. It did not take long for Mathewson to become the unspoken captain of the Giants. He was the only player to whom John McGraw
John McGraw
ever gave full discretion. McGraw told many younger players to watch and listen to his wisdom. Mathewson garnered respect throughout the baseball world as a pitcher of great sportsmanship. He was often asked to write columns concerning upcoming games. In 1912, Mathewson published his classic memoir 'Pitching in a Pinch,' or Pitching from the Inside,[20] which was admired by poet Marianne Moore[21] and still in print.[22] Years later Mathewson co-wrote a mildly successful play called The Girl and The Pennant. He went on to pursue more literary endeavors ending in 1917 with a children's book called Second Base Sloan.[23] One of the journalists to unmask the 1919 Black Sox, Hugh Fullerton, consulted Mathewson for information about baseball gambling. He trusted Mathewson for his writing intellect as well as his unbiased standpoint. Representing the only former ballplayer among the group of investigating journalists, Mathewson played a small role in Fullerton's exposure of the 1919 World Series
World Series
scandal.[17] World War I and afterward[edit] Late in the 1918 season, Mathewson enlisted in the United States
United States
Army for World War I. His wife Jane was very much opposed to the decision, but Mathewson insisted on going.[24] He served overseas as a captain in the newly formed Chemical Service along with Ty Cobb. When he arrived in France, he was accidentally gassed during a chemical training exercise and subsequently developed tuberculosis,[4] which more easily infects lungs that have been damaged by chemical gases. Mathewson served with the American Expeditionary Force until February 1919 and was discharged later that month.[25] Although he returned to serve as a coach for the Giants from 1919–1921, he spent a good portion of that time in Saranac Lake fighting the tuberculosis, initially at the Trudeau Sanitorium, and later in a house that he had built.[9] In 1923, Mathewson returned to professional baseball when he and Giants attorney Emil Fuchs put together a syndicate that bought the Boston Braves. Although initial plans called for Mathewson to be principal owner and team president, his health had deteriorated so much that he was no more than a figurehead. He turned over the presidency to Fuchs after the season. Death and legacy[edit]

Mathewson's private "cure cottage" in Saranac Lake

Mathewson's gravesite at Lewisburg Cemetery in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania

After contracting tuberculosis, Mathewson moved to the frigid climate of Saranac Lake, New York
Saranac Lake, New York
in the Adirondack Mountains
Adirondack Mountains
where he sought treatment from Edward Livingston Trudeau
Edward Livingston Trudeau
at his renowned Adirondack Cottage Sanitarium. He died in Saranac Lake, New York, of tuberculosis on October 7, 1925. Mathewson is buried at Lewisburg Cemetery in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania, adjacent to Bucknell University. Members of the Pittsburgh Pirates
Pittsburgh Pirates
and the Washington Senators wore black armbands during the 1925 World Series. Mathewson had died on the day the Series began, October 7. According to the Ken Burns documentary series, Baseball, some of Mathewson's last words were to his wife: "Now Jane, I want you to go outside and have yourself a good cry. Don't make it a long one; this can't be helped."

Christy Mathewson
Christy Mathewson
Day is celebrated as a holiday in his hometown of Factoryville, Pennsylvania, on the Saturday closest to his birthday. Christy Mathewson
Christy Mathewson
Day and Factoryville, Pennsylvania, are the subjects of the documentary, Christy Mathewson
Christy Mathewson
Day[26] Bucknell's football stadium is named "Christy Mathewson–Memorial Stadium". The baseball field at Keystone College
Keystone College
is named "Christy Mathewson Field." Christy Mathewson
Christy Mathewson
Park in Factoryville is home to the community's Little League
Little League
field, as well as basketball courts and other athletic facilities, public gardens, walking trails and a picnic pavilion. The former Whittenton Ballfield in Taunton, Massachusetts, is named in memory of Christy Mathewson, who played for the Taunton team in the New England Baseball
Baseball
League before he joined the New York Giants. Mathewson is mentioned in the poem "Line-Up for Yesterday" by Ogden Nash. Jazz pianist Dave Frishberg, composer of several baseball-themed songs, wrote one called "Matty" for Mathewson. Mathewson is a central character in Eric Rolfe Greenberg's historical novel "The Celebrant,"[27] which chronicles turn-of-the-century American life by weaving together Mathewson's story with the life of an immigrant Jewish family in New York. In 2002, the book was selected as one of the top 100 sports books of all time by Sports Illustrated[28].

Baseball
Baseball
honors[edit]

Mathewson statue in Christy Mathewson
Christy Mathewson
Park in Factoryville, Pennsylvania

In 1936, Mathewson was voted into the Baseball
Baseball
Hall of Fame as one of its first five inductees, along with Babe Ruth, Ty Cobb, Walter Johnson, and Honus Wagner. He was the only one of the five who didn't live to see his induction.[29] His jersey, denoted as "NY", has been retired by the Giants and hangs in the left-field corner of AT&T Park. Uniform numbers were not used during the time when Mathewson played for the Giants. In 1999, he ranked number 7 on The Sporting News' list of the 100 Greatest Baseball
Baseball
Players, the highest-ranking National League pitcher. ESPN
ESPN
selected his pitching performance in the 1905 World Series
World Series
as the greatest playoff performance of all time.[30] During World War II, a 422-foot Liberty ship
Liberty ship
named in his honor, SS Christy Mathewson, was built in Richmond, California in 1943. His plaque at the Baseball
Baseball
Hall of Fame says: "Greatest of all of the great pitchers in the 20th century's first quarter" and ends with the statement: "Matty was master of them all"

Filmography[edit] (compiled per IMDb)

Christy Mathewson
Christy Mathewson
and the New York National League
National League
Team (1907) *short actuality Athletics vs. Giants in the World's Championship Baseball
Baseball
Series of 1911 (1911) *short actualitys Breaking into the Big League
Breaking into the Big League
(1913) *short The Giants-White Sox Tour (1914) *short actuality The Universal Boy (1914) *short Love and Baseball
Baseball
(1914) *short Matty's Decision (1915) *short Animated Weekly, No.16 (1916) *short newsreel Animated Weekly, No.31 (1916) *short newsreel The Baseball
Baseball
Revue of 1917 (1917) *5 reel feature actuality

See also[edit]

Biography portal Baseball
Baseball
portal World War I portal

Line-Up for Yesterday

M is for Matty, Who carried a charm In the form of an extra brain in his arm.

— Ogden Nash, Sport magazine (January 1949)[31]

300 win club List of Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
career wins leaders Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
Triple Crown List of Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
annual saves leaders List of Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
annual shutout leaders List of Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
annual strikeout leaders List of Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
annual wins leaders List of Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
career strikeout leaders Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
titles leaders List of Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
no-hitters List of Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
player-managers

Notes[edit]

^ "MLB & Baseball
Baseball
Leaders & Records". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2013-11-25.  ^ "MLB & Baseball
Baseball
Leaders & Records". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2014-02-19.  ^ "Career Leaders for ERA / Career Leaders for Earned Run Average". Baseball
Baseball
Almanac. Retrieved July 10, 2017.  ^ a b "Christy Mathewson". HistoricBaseball.com. Retrieved 2006-10-28.  ^ "Christy Mathewson". Phigam.org. Archived from the original on September 27, 2007. Retrieved 2007-03-16.  ^ a b c Kashatus (2002), p. 27. ^ Kashatus (2002), p. 33. ^ Russell, Fred. "Sidelines: Little-Known Fact About Matty", Nashville Banner, December 22, 1958. ^ a b c d "Christy Mathewson". BaseballLibrary.com. Archived from the original on February 6, 2007. Retrieved October 28, 2006.  ^ a b "Christy Mathewson". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2007-01-31.  ^ "Keystone Adds Football as 22nd Varsity Sport".  ^ Goodwin, Stew (Summer 1994). "Hall-of-Famers on the Early Gridiron" (PDF). The National Pastime. Cleveland, Ohio: Society for American Baseball
Baseball
Research. 14: 97–98. ISBN 0-910137-56-0. Retrieved August 15, 2012.  ^ Carroll, Bob (1980). "Dave Berry and the Philadelphia Story" (PDF). Coffin Corner. Professional Football Researchers Association. 2 (Annual): 1–9. Archived from the original (PDF) on December 15, 2010.  ^ Bill James
Bill James
& Rob Neyer (2004). The Neyer/James Guide to Pitchers. p. 296.  ^ Rube Foster ^ "The Ballplayers: Christy Mathewson". BaseballLibrary.com. September 4, 1916. Archived from the original on April 14, 2009. Retrieved April 3, 2009.  ^ a b c d Robinson, Ray (1994). Matty : an American hero. New York: Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-19-509263-9.  ^ Vaccaro, Mike (2009). First Fall Classic. New York: Doubleday.  ^ a b Okrent, Daniel (1988). The Ultimate Baseball
Baseball
Book. United States: Hilltown Press. p. 80. ISBN 0395361451.  ^ Mathewson, Christy (1912). Pitching in a Pinch, or Baseball
Baseball
from the Inside. G.B. Putnam & Sons. ISBN 0812821963.  ^ Hemispheres, Grace Shulman; Grace Schulman is the author of Marianne Moore: The Poetry of Engagement Her latest book of poems is (1986-11-30). "A Gusto for Dumbo and Balanchine". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2018-02-22.  ^ 1880-1925., Mathewson, Christy, (1994). Pitching in a pinch, or, Baseball
Baseball
from the inside. Greenberg, Eric Rolfe., Wheeler, John N. (John Neville), 1886-1973. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press. ISBN 9780803282124. OCLC 29430072.  ^ Mathewson, Christy (1917). Second Base Sloan. New York: Dodd, Meade & Co.  ^ Hartley, Michael (2004). Christy Mathewson: a biography. Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland & Co. ISBN 978-0-7864-1653-0.  ^ Official Roster of Ohio
Ohio
Soldiers, Sailors and Marines, World War 1917-18. Columbus, Ohio: Ohio
Ohio
Adjutant-General's Department. 1926. p. 10886.  ^ " Christy Mathewson
Christy Mathewson
Day". 23circles Productions. 2011. Retrieved 2013-11-25.  ^ Greenberg, Eric Rolfe (1983). The Celebrant: A Novel. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press. ISBN 978-0-8032-7037-4.  ^ McEntegart, Pete. "The Top 100 Sports Books of All Time". SI.com. Sports Illustrated. Retrieved 4 July 2017.  ^ Kashatus (2002), p. 120. ^ "50 Greatest Playoff Performances". espn.com. Retrieved 2008-08-20.  ^ "Line-Up For Yesterday by Ogden Nash". Ogden Nash. Sport Magazine. Retrieved 2008-08-20. 

References[edit]

Carroll, Bob (1980). "Dave Berry and the Philadelphia Story" (PDF). Coffin Corner. Professional Football Researchers Association. 2 (Annual): 1–9. Archived from the original (PDF) on December 15, 2010.  Gaines, Bob. 2015. Christy Matthewson: The Christian
Christian
Gentleman. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield. Kashatus, William C. (2002). Diamonds in the Coalfields: 21 Remarkable Baseball
Baseball
Players, Managers, and Umpires from Northeast Pennsylvania. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company. Peterson, Robert W. (1997). Pigskin: The Early Years of Pro Football. Oxford University Press. 

Works[edit]

Christy Mathewson, "'Outguessing' the Batter," Pearson's Magazine, vol. 25, no. 5 (May 1911), pp. 568–575.

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Christy Mathewson.

Career statistics and player information from MLB, or ESPN, or Baseball-Reference, or Fangraphs, or The Baseball Cube, or Baseball-Reference (Minors) Christy Mathewson
Christy Mathewson
managerial career statistics at Baseball-Reference.com

Christy Mathewson
Christy Mathewson
at the Baseball
Baseball
Hall of Fame christymathewson.com Official site Christy Mathewson
Christy Mathewson
on IMDb "Christy Mathewson". Find a Grave. Retrieved 2009-05-14.  Baseball
Baseball
Almanac list of brothers SABR Christy Mathewson
Christy Mathewson
biography

Links to related articles

Preceded by Noodles Hahn Jesse Tannehill No-hitter
No-hitter
pitcher July 15, 1901 June 13, 1905 Succeeded by Nixey Callahan Weldon Henley

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300 win club

Cy Young Walter Johnson Christy Mathewson Grover Cleveland Alexander Warren Spahn Pud Galvin Kid Nichols Greg Maddux Roger Clemens Tim Keefe Steve Carlton John Clarkson Eddie Plank Nolan Ryan Don Sutton Phil Niekro Gaylord Perry Tom Seaver Charles Radbourn Mickey Welch Tom Glavine Randy Johnson Lefty Grove Early Wynn

Book:300 win club

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Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
All-Century Team

Pitchers

Nolan Ryan Sandy Koufax Cy Young Roger Clemens Bob Gibson Walter Johnson Warren Spahn Christy Mathewson Lefty Grove

Catchers

Johnny Bench Yogi Berra

Infielders

Lou Gehrig Mark McGwire Jackie Robinson Rogers Hornsby Mike Schmidt Brooks Robinson Cal Ripken Jr. Ernie Banks Honus Wagner

Outfielders

Babe Ruth Hank Aaron Ted Williams Willie Mays Joe DiMaggio Mickey Mantle Ty Cobb Ken Griffey Jr. Pete Rose Stan Musial

v t e

Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
pitchers who have won the Triple Crown

Grover Cleveland Alexander Tommy Bond Steve Carlton John Clarkson Roger Clemens Bob Feller Lefty Gomez Dwight Gooden Lefty Grove Guy Hecker Randy Johnson Walter Johnson Tim Keefe Clayton Kershaw Sandy Koufax Pedro Martínez Christy Mathewson Hal Newhouser Jake Peavy Charles Radbourn Amos Rusie Johan Santana Dazzy Vance Hippo Vaughn Justin Verlander Rube Waddell Bucky Walters Cy Young

v t e

National League
National League
season wins leaders

1876: Spalding 1877: Bond 1878: Bond 1879: Ward 1880: J. McCormick 1881: Corcoran & Whitney 1882: J. McCormick 1883: Radbourn 1884: Radbourn 1885: Clarkson 1886: Baldwin & Keefe 1887: Clarkson 1888: Keefe 1889: Clarkson 1890: Hutchinson 1891: Hutchinson 1892: Hutchinson & Young 1893: Killen 1894: Rusie 1895: Young 1896: Killen & Nichols 1897: Nichols 1898: Nichols 1899: Hughes & McGinnity 1900: McGinnity 1901: Donovan 1902: Chesbro 1903: McGinnity 1904: McGinnity 1905: Mathewson 1906: McGinnity 1907: Mathewson 1908: Mathewson 1909: Brown 1910: Mathewson 1911: Alexander 1912: Cheney & Marquard 1913: Seaton 1914: Alexander 1915: Alexander 1916: Alexander 1917: Alexander 1918: Vaughn 1919: Barnes 1920: Alexander 1921: W. Cooper & Grimes 1922: Rixey 1923: Luque 1924: Vance 1925: Vance 1926: Donohue, Kremer, Meadows & Rhem 1927: Root 1928: Benton & Grimes 1929: Malone 1930: Kremer & Malone 1931: Elliott, Hallahan & Meine 1932: Warneke 1933: Hubbell 1934: Dean 1935: Dean 1936: Hubbell 1937: Hubbell 1938: Lee 1939: Walters 1940: Walters 1941: Higbe & Wyatt 1942: M. Cooper 1943: M. Cooper, Riddle & Sewell 1944: Walters 1945: Barrett 1946: Pollet 1947: Blackwell 1948: Sain 1949: Spahn 1950: Spahn 1951: Jansen & Maglie 1952: Roberts 1953: Roberts & Spahn 1954: Roberts 1955: Roberts 1956: Newcombe 1957: Spahn 1958: Friend & Spahn 1959: Burdette, S. Jones & Spahn 1960: Broglio & Spahn 1961: Jay & Spahn 1962: Drysdale 1963: Koufax & Marichal 1964: L. Jackson 1965: Koufax 1966: Koufax 1967: M. McCormick 1968: Marichal 1969: Seaver 1970: Gibson & Perry 1971: Jenkins 1972: Carlton 1973: Bryant 1974: Messersmith & P. Niekro 1975: Seaver 1976: R. Jones 1977: Carlton 1978: Perry 1979: J. Niekro & P. Niekro 1980: Carlton 1981: Seaver 1982: Carlton 1983: Denny 1984: Andújar 1985: Gooden 1986: Valenzuela 1987: Sutcliffe 1988: Hershiser & D. Jackson 1989: Scott 1990: Drabek 1991: Glavine & Smiley 1992: Glavine & Maddux 1993: Burkett & Glavine 1994: Hill & Maddux 1995: Maddux 1996: Smoltz 1997: Neagle 1998: Glavine 1999: Hampton 2000: Glavine 2001: Morris & Schilling 2002: Johnson 2003: Ortiz 2004: Oswalt 2005: Willis 2006: Harang, Lowe, Penny, Smoltz, Webb & Zambrano 2007: Peavy 2008: Webb 2009: Wainwright 2010: Halladay 2011: Kennedy & Kershaw 2012: González 2013: Wainwright & Zimmermann 2014: Kershaw 2015: Arrieta 2016: Scherzer 2017: Kershaw

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National League
National League
season ERA leaders

1876: Bradley 1877: Bond 1878: Ward 1879: Bond 1880: Keefe 1881: Wiedman 1882: Corcoran 1883: J. McCormick 1884: Radbourn 1885: Keefe 1886: Boyle 1887: Casey 1888: Keefe 1889: Clarkson 1890: Rhines 1891: Ewing 1892: Young 1893: Breitenstein 1894: Rusie 1895: Maul 1896: Rhines 1897: Rusie 1898: Griffith 1899: Willis 1900: Waddell 1901: Tannehill 1902: Taylor 1903: Leever 1904: McGinnity 1905: Mathewson 1906: M. Brown 1907: Pfiester 1908: Mathewson 1909: Mathewson 1910: Cole 1911: Mathewson 1912: Tesreau 1913: Mathewson 1914: Doak 1915: Alexander 1916: Alexander 1917: Anderson 1918: Vaughn 1919: Alexander 1920: Alexander 1921: Doak 1922: Douglas 1923: Luque 1924: Vance 1925: Luque 1926: Kremer 1927: Kremer 1928: Vance 1929: Walker 1930: Vance 1931: Walker 1932: Warneke 1933: Hubbell 1934: Hubbell 1935: Blanton 1936: Hubbell 1937: Turner 1938: Lee 1939: Walters 1940: Walters 1941: Riddle 1942: Cooper 1943: Lanier 1944: Heusser 1945: Prim 1946: Pollet 1947: Spahn 1948: Brecheen 1949: Koslo 1950: Maglie 1951: Nichols, Jr. 1952: Wilhelm 1953: Spahn 1954: Antonelli 1955: Friend 1956: Burdette 1957: Podres 1958: Miller 1959: S. Jones 1960: M. McCormick 1961: Spahn 1962: Koufax 1963: Koufax 1964: Koufax 1965: Koufax 1966: Koufax 1967: Niekro 1968: Gibson 1969: Marichal 1970: Seaver 1971: Seaver 1972: Carlton 1973: Seaver 1974: Capra 1975: R. Jones 1976: Denny 1977: Candelaria 1978: Swan 1979: Richard 1980: Sutton 1981: Ryan 1982: Rogers 1983: Hammaker 1984: Peña 1985: Gooden 1986: Scott 1987: Ryan 1988: Magrane 1989: Garrelts 1990: Darwin 1991: D. Martínez 1992: Swift 1993: Maddux 1994: Maddux 1995: Maddux 1996: K. Brown 1997: P. Martínez 1998: Maddux 1999: R. Johnson 2000: K. Brown 2001: R. Johnson 2002: R. Johnson 2003: Schmidt 2004: Peavy 2005: Clemens 2006: Oswalt 2007: Peavy 2008: Santana 2009: Carpenter 2010: J. Johnson 2011: Kershaw 2012: Kershaw 2013: Kershaw 2014: Kershaw 2015: Greinke 2016: Hendricks 2017: Kershaw

v t e

National League
National League
season strikeout leaders

1876: Devlin 1877: Bond 1878: Bond 1879: Ward 1880: Corcoran 1881: Derby 1882: Radbourn 1883: Whitney 1884: Radbourn 1885: Clarkson 1886: Baldwin 1887: Clarkson 1888: Keefe 1889: Clarkson 1890: Rusie 1891: Rusie 1892: Hutchinson 1893: Rusie 1894: Rusie 1895: Rusie 1896: Young 1897: McJames & Seymour 1898: Seymour 1899: Hahn 1900: Hahn 1901: Hahn 1902: Willis 1903: Mathewson 1904: Mathewson 1905: Mathewson 1906: Beebe 1907: Mathewson 1908: Mathewson 1909: Overall 1910: Moore 1911: Marquard 1912: Alexander 1913: Seaton 1914: Alexander 1915: Alexander 1916: Alexander 1917: Alexander 1918: Vaughn 1919: Vaughn 1920: Alexander 1921: Grimes 1922: Vance 1923: Vance 1924: Vance 1925: Vance 1926: Vance 1927: Vance 1928: Vance 1929: Malone 1930: Hallahan 1931: Hallahan 1932: Dean 1933: Dean 1934: Dean 1935: Dean 1936: Mungo 1937: Hubbell 1938: Bryant 1939: Passeau & Walters 1940: Higbe 1941: Vander Meer 1942: Vander Meer 1943: Vander Meer 1944: Voiselle 1945: Roe 1946: Schmitz 1947: Blackwell 1948: Brecheen 1949: Spahn 1950: Spahn 1951: Newcombe & Spahn 1952: Spahn 1953: Roberts 1954: Roberts 1955: Jones 1956: Jones 1957: Sanford 1958: Jones 1959: Drysdale 1960: Drysdale 1961: Koufax 1962: Drysdale 1963: Koufax 1964: Veale 1965: Koufax 1966: Koufax 1967: Bunning 1968: Gibson 1969: Jenkins 1970: Seaver 1971: Seaver 1972: Carlton 1973: Seaver 1974: Carlton 1975: Seaver 1976: Seaver 1977: Niekro 1978: Richard 1979: Richard 1980: Carlton 1981: Valenzuela 1982: Carlton 1983: Carlton 1984: Gooden 1985: Gooden 1986: Scott 1987: Ryan 1988: Ryan 1989: DeLeón 1990: Cone 1991: Cone 1992: Smoltz 1993: Rijo 1994: Benes 1995: Nomo 1996: Smoltz 1997: Schilling 1998: Schilling 1999: Johnson 2000: Johnson 2001: Johnson 2002: Johnson 2003: Wood 2004: Johnson 2005: Peavy 2006: Harang 2007: Peavy 2008: Lincecum 2009: Lincecum 2010: Lincecum 2011: Kershaw 2012: Dickey 2013: Kershaw 2014: Cueto & Strasburg 2015: Kershaw 2016: Scherzer 2017: Scherzer

v t e

New York Giants 1904 National League
National League
Champions

Red Ames Frank Bowerman Roger Bresnahan George Browne Bill Dahlen Art Devlin Mike Donlin Jack Dunn Billy Gilbert Christy Mathewson Moose McCormick Dan McGann Joe McGinnity Sam Mertes Dummy Taylor Jack Warner Hooks Wiltse

Manager: John McGraw Trainer: Harry Tuthill

v t e

New York Giants 1905 World Series
World Series
champions

Red Ames Roger Bresnahan Frank Bowerman George Browne Boileryard Clarke Bill Dahlen Art Devlin Mike Donlin Claude Elliott Billy Gilbert Moonlight Graham Bob Hall Christy Mathewson Dan McGann Joe McGinnity Sam Mertes Offa Neal Sammy Strang Dummy Taylor Hooks Wiltse

Manager: John McGraw Trainer: Harry Tuthill

Regular season Athletics–Giants rivalry

v t e

New York Giants 1921 World Series
World Series
champions

Dave Bancroft Jesse Barnes George Burns Phil Douglas Frankie Frisch George Kelly Irish Meusel Art Nehf Johnny Rawlings Earl Smith Frank Snyder Fred Toney Ross Youngs

Manager John McGraw

Coaches Jesse Burkett Hughie Jennings Christy Mathewson

Regular season Giants–Yankees rivalry Subway Series

v t e

New York / San Francisco Giants
San Francisco Giants
Opening Day starting pitchers

Red Ames Fred Anderson Johnny Antonelli Jesse Barnes Virgil Barnes Jim Barr Larry Benton Ty Blach Vida Blue Tom Bradley Madison Bumgarner John Burkett Matt Cain Mark Davis Phil Douglas Dave Dravecky Shawn Estes Freddie Fitzsimmons Mark Gardner Rubén Gómez Harry Gumbert Atlee Hammaker Liván Hernández Al Holland Carl Hubbell Larry Jansen Bob Knepper Mike Krukow Mark Leiter Tim Lincecum Bill Lohrman Sal Maglie Juan Marichal Rube Marquard Christy Mathewson Joe McGinnity Hugh McQuillan Cliff Melton John Montefusco Terry Mulholland Art Nehf Gaylord Perry Rick Reuschel Kirk Rueter Rosy Ryan Jack Sanford Jason Schmidt Hal Schumacher Bill Swift Dummy Taylor Jeff Tesreau Bill Voiselle Bill Walker Barry Zito

v t e

New York/ San Francisco Giants
San Francisco Giants
retired numbers

NY Christy Mathewson NY John McGraw 3 Bill Terry 4 Mel Ott 11 Carl Hubbell 20 Monte Irvin 24 Willie Mays 27 Juan Marichal 30 Orlando Cepeda 36 Gaylord Perry 42 Jackie Robinson 44 Willie McCovey

v t e

San Francisco
San Francisco
Giants

Formerly the New York Gothams and the New York Giants Based in San Francisco, California (Bay Area)

Franchise

History in New York History in San Francisco Seasons Records No-hitters Players Managers Owners and executives Opening Day starting pitchers First-round draft picks Broadcasters

Ballparks

Polo Grounds Oakland Park St. George Grounds Hilltop Park Seals Stadium Candlestick Park AT&T Park

Spring training

Payne Park Flamingo Field LSU Varsity Baseball
Baseball
Field Al Lang Stadium Phoenix Municipal Stadium Scottsdale Stadium

Culture

1989 Loma Prieta earthquake Curse of Coogan's Bluff "Don't Stop Believin'" "Lights" (Journey song) McCovey Cove New York Brickley Giants The Fan The Franchise (Showtime TV series) White Flag Trade Willie Mac Award "You Dropped a Bomb on Me"

Lore

1894 Temple Cup Matt Cain's perfect game Merkle's Boner NL tie-breakers

1951 tie-breaker series 1962 tie-breaker series 1998 Wild Card tie-breaker game

NL Wild Card Games

2014 2016

"Shot Heard 'Round the World" The Catch

Rivalries

Los Angeles Dodgers Oakland Athletics Subway Series/New York Yankees

Retired numbers

NY NY 3 4 11 20 24 27 30 36 44 42

Pre- World Series
World Series
Champions (2)

1888 1889

Temple Cup
Temple Cup
Champions (1)

1894

World Series
World Series
Champions (8)

1905 1921 1922 1933 1954 2010 2012 2014

National League Championships (23)

1888 1889 1904 1905 1911 1912 1913 1917 1921 1922 1923 1924 1933 1936 1937 1951 1954 1962 1989 2002 2010 2012 2014

Division titles (8)

1971 1987 1989 1997 2000 2003 2010 2012

Wild card (3)

2002 2014 2016

Minor league affiliates

AAA Sacramento River Cats AA Richmond Flying Squirrels A Adv. San Jose Giants A Augusta GreenJackets Short A Salem-Keizer Volcanoes Rookie AZL Giants DSL Giants

Seasons (136)

1880s

1880 · 1881 · 1882 · 1883 1884 1885 1886 1887 1888 1889

1890s

1890 1891 1892 1893 1894 1895 1896 1897 1898 1899

1900s

1900 1901 1902 1903 1904 1905 1906 1907 1908 1909

1910s

1910 1911 1912 1913 1914 1915 1916 1917 1918 1919

1920s

1920 1921 1922 1923 1924 1925 1926 1927 1928 1929

1930s

1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939

1940s

1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949

1950s

1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959

1960s

1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969

1970s

1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979

1980s

1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989

1990s

1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999

2000s

2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

2010s

2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

v t e

Cincinnati Reds
Cincinnati Reds
managers

Pop Snyder
Pop Snyder
(1882–1884) Will White
Will White
(1884) O. P. Caylor
O. P. Caylor
(1885–1886) Gus Schmelz (1887–1889) Tom Loftus (1890–1891) Charles Comiskey
Charles Comiskey
(1892–1894) Buck Ewing
Buck Ewing
(1895–1899) Bob Allen (1900) Bid McPhee (1901–1902) Frank Bancroft
Frank Bancroft
(1902) Joe Kelley
Joe Kelley
(1902–1905) Ned Hanlon (1906–1907) John Ganzel
John Ganzel
(1908) Clark Griffith
Clark Griffith
(1909–1911) Hank O'Day
Hank O'Day
(1912) Joe Tinker
Joe Tinker
(1913) Buck Herzog
Buck Herzog
(1914–1916) Ivey Wingo
Ivey Wingo
(1916) Christy Mathewson
Christy Mathewson
(1916–1918) Heinie Groh (1918) Pat Moran
Pat Moran
(1919–1923) Jack Hendricks (1924–1929) Dan Howley
Dan Howley
(1930–1932) Donie Bush
Donie Bush
(1933) Bob O'Farrell
Bob O'Farrell
(1934) Burt Shotton (1934) Chuck Dressen (1934–1937) Bobby Wallace (1937) Bill McKechnie
Bill McKechnie
(1938–1946) Hank Gowdy
Hank Gowdy
(1946) Johnny Neun (1947–1948) Bucky Walters
Bucky Walters
(1948–1949) Luke Sewell
Luke Sewell
(1949–1952) Earle Brucker (1952) Rogers Hornsby
Rogers Hornsby
(1952–1953) Buster Mills (1953) Birdie Tebbetts
Birdie Tebbetts
(1954–1958) Jimmy Dykes
Jimmy Dykes
(1958) Mayo Smith
Mayo Smith
(1959) Fred Hutchinson
Fred Hutchinson
(1959–1964) Dick Sisler
Dick Sisler
(1964–1965) Don Heffner
Don Heffner
(1966) Dave Bristol (1966–1969) Sparky Anderson
Sparky Anderson
(1970–1978) John McNamara (1979–1982) Russ Nixon (1982–1983) Vern Rapp (1984) Pete Rose
Pete Rose
(1984–1989) Tommy Helms (1988–1989) Lou Piniella
Lou Piniella
(1990–1992) Tony Pérez
Tony Pérez
(1993) Davey Johnson
Davey Johnson
(1993–1995) Ray Knight
Ray Knight
(1996–1997) Jack McKeon
Jack McKeon
(1997–2000) Bob Boone
Bob Boone
(2001–2003) Ray Knight
Ray Knight
(2003) Dave Miley (2003–2005) Jerry Narron
Jerry Narron
(2005–2007) Pete Mackanin
Pete Mackanin
(2007) Dusty Baker
Dusty Baker
(2008–2013) Bryan Price
Bryan Price
(2014–)

v t e

Principal owners of the Atlanta Braves
Atlanta Braves
franchise

Boston Red Stockings/Red Caps/Beaneaters/ Doves/Rustlers/Bees/Braves (1871–1952)

Ivers Whitney Adams John Conkey Charles Porter Nicholas Apollonio Arthur Soden George & John Dovey John Dovey John P. Harris William Hepburn Russell James Gaffney John Montgomery Ward
John Montgomery Ward
& James Gaffney James Gaffney Percy Haughton George W. Grant Christy Mathewson
Christy Mathewson
& Emil Fuchs Emil Fuchs Charles Adams Bob Quinn Lou Perini

Milwaukee Braves (1953–1965)

Lou Perini William Bartholomay

Atlanta Braves
Atlanta Braves
(1966–present)

William Bartholomay Ted Turner Turner Broadcasting Time Warner Liberty Media

v t e

Boston/Milwaukee/ Atlanta Braves
Atlanta Braves
Presidents

Boston Red Stockings/Red Caps/Beaneaters/ Doves/Rustlers/Bees/Braves (1871–1952)

Adams Conkey Porter Apollonio Soden G. Dovey J. Dovey Russell Ward Gaffney Haughton Grant Mathewson Fuchs Quinn Perini

Milwaukee Braves (1953–1965)

Perini Cairnes McHale

Atlanta Braves
Atlanta Braves
(1966–present)

McHale Bartholomay Donahue Turner Kasten McGuirk Schuerholz

v t e

Baseball
Baseball
Hall of Fame Class of 1936

BBWAA Vote

Ty Cobb
Ty Cobb
(98.2%) Walter Johnson
Walter Johnson
(83.6%) Christy Mathewson
Christy Mathewson
(90.7%) Babe Ruth
Babe Ruth
(95.1%) Honus Wagner
Honus Wagner
(95.1%)

Veterans Committee

none

v t e

Members of the National Baseball
Baseball
Hall of Fame

Pitchers

Alexander Bender Blyleven M. Brown R. Brown Bunning Carlton Chesbro Clarkson Cooper Coveleski Cummings Day Dean Dihigo Drysdale Eckersley Faber Feller Fingers Ford B. Foster Galvin B. Gibson Glavine Gomez Gossage Grimes Grove Haines Hoffman Hoyt Hubbell Hunter Jenkins R. Johnson W. Johnson Joss Keefe Koufax Lemon Lyons Maddux Marichal Marquard Martínez Mathewson McGinnity Méndez Morris Newhouser Nichols Niekro Paige Palmer Pennock Perry Plank Radbourn Rixey Roberts Rogan Ruffing Rusie Ryan Seaver H. Smith Smoltz Spahn Sutter Sutton Vance Waddell Walsh Welch Wilhelm J. Williams Willis Wynn Young

Catchers

Bench Berra Bresnahan Campanella Carter Cochrane Dickey Ewing Ferrell Fisk J. Gibson Hartnett Lombardi Mackey Piazza Rodríguez Santop Schalk

First basemen

Anson Bagwell Beckley Bottomley Brouthers Cepeda Chance Connor Foxx Gehrig Greenberg G. Kelly Killebrew Leonard McCovey Mize Murray Pérez Sisler Suttles Taylor Terry Thomas Thome

Second basemen

Alomar Biggio Carew E. Collins Doerr Evers Fox Frisch Gehringer Gordon Grant Herman Hornsby Lajoie Lazzeri Mazeroski McPhee Morgan J. Robinson Sandberg Schoendienst

Third basemen

Baker Boggs Brett J. Collins Dandridge J. Johnson Jones Kell Lindstrom Mathews Molitor B. Robinson Santo Schmidt Traynor J. Wilson D. White

Shortstops

Aparicio Appling Bancroft Banks Boudreau Cronin Davis T. Jackson Jennings Larkin Lloyd Maranville Reese Ripken Jr. Rizzuto Sewell O. Smith Tinker Trammell Vaughan Wagner Wallace Ward Wells Yount

Outfielders

Aaron Ashburn Averill Bell Brock W. Brown Burkett Carey Charleston Clarke Clemente Cobb Combs Crawford Cuyler Dawson Delahanty DiMaggio Doby Duffy Flick Goslin Griffey Jr. Guerrero Gwynn Hafey Hamilton Heilmann Henderson Hill Hooper Irvin R. Jackson Kaline Keeler Kelley K. Kelly Kiner Klein Mantle Manush Mays T. McCarthy Medwick Musial O'Rourke Ott Puckett Raines J. Rice S. Rice F. Robinson Roush Ruth Simmons Slaughter Snider Speaker Stargell Stearnes Thompson Torriente L. Waner P. Waner Wheat B. Williams T. Williams H. Wilson Winfield Yastrzemski Youngs

Managers

Alston Anderson Cox Durocher Hanlon Harris Herzog Huggins La Russa Lasorda López Mack J. McCarthy McGraw McKechnie W. Robinson Selee Southworth Stengel Torre Weaver D. Williams

Executives / pioneers

Barrow Bulkeley Cartwright Chadwick Chandler Comiskey Dreyfuss R. Foster Frick Giles Gillick Griffith Harridge Hulbert B. Johnson Kuhn Landis La. MacPhail Le. MacPhail Manley O'Malley Pompez Posey Rickey Ruppert Schuerholz Selig Spalding Veeck Weiss S. White Wilkinson G. Wright H. Wright Yawkey

Umpires

Barlick Chylak Conlan Connolly Evans Harvey Hubbard Klem McGowan O'Day

v t e

San Francisco Giants
San Francisco Giants
Hall of Famers

Inducted as a Giant

Orlando Cepeda Roger Connor George Davis Buck Ewing Carl Hubbell Monte Irvin Travis Jackson Tim Keefe George Kelly Freddie Lindstrom Juan Marichal Rube Marquard Christy Mathewson Willie Mays Willie McCovey Joe McGinnity John McGraw Jim O'Rourke Mel Ott Gaylord Perry Bill Terry Mickey Welch Hoyt Wilhelm Ross Youngs

Inductees who played for the Giants

Dave Bancroft Jake Beckley Roger Bresnahan Dan Brouthers Jesse Burkett Steve Carlton Gary Carter Leo Durocher Frankie Frisch Rich Gossage Burleigh Grimes Gabby Hartnett Rogers Hornsby Waite Hoyt Randy Johnson Willie Keeler King Kelly Tony Lazzeri Ernie Lombardi Joe Medwick Johnny Mize Joe Morgan Hank O'Day Edd Roush Amos Rusie Ray Schalk Red Schoendienst Duke Snider Warren Spahn John Montgomery Ward Hack Wilson

Giants managers

Buck Ewing Rogers Hornsby John McGraw Hank O'Day Mel Ott Bill Terry John Montgomery Ward

Other

Cap Anson Hughie Jennings Bill McKechnie Frank Robinson Casey Stengel

Frick Award

Ernie Harwell Russ Hodges Tim McCarver Jon Miller Lindsey Nelson Lon Simmons

v t e

Members of the National College Baseball
Baseball
Hall of Fame

Players

Jim Abbott Steve Arlin Joe Arnold Eddie Bane Sal Bando Alan Bannister Floyd Bannister Lance Berkman Bill Bordley Tom Borland Lou Brock Joe Carter Will Clark Matt DeSalvo Darren Dreifort Kirk Dressendorfer J. D. Drew Alex Fernandez Mike Fiore Terry Francona Eddy Furniss Nomar Garciaparra Ralph Garr Danny Goodwin Dick Groat Neal Heaton Don Heinkel Al Holland Burt Hooton Bob Horner Dick Howser Pete Incaviglia Tim Jorgensen Mike Kelly Brooks Kieschnick Fred Lynn Barry Larkin Tino Martinez William Clarence Matthews Ben McDonald Oddibe McDowell Dave Magadan Rick Monday Keith Moreland John Olerud Tom Paciorek Rafael Palmeiro Rick Reichardt Roy Smalley III Phil Stephenson Mickey Sullivan B. J. Surhoff Greg Swindell Derek Tatsuno Robin Ventura Frank Viola Tim Wallach Todd Walker Brad Wilkerson Dave Winfield Rich Wortham

Coaches

Bob Bennett Skip Bertman Robert Braddy Chuck Brayton Jim Brock Ed Cheff Rod Dedeaux Bibb Falk Ron Fraser Augie Garrido Gordie Gillespie Wayne Graham Cliff Gustafson Larry Hays Bill Holowaty Ralph Waldo Emerson Jones Wally Kincaid Jerry Kindall Demie Mainieri Ron Polk Frank Sancet Don Schaly Dick Siebert Gene Stephenson Mickey Sullivan Tommy Thomas Bob Todd Gary Ward Bill Wilhelm John Winkin Bobby Winkles

Veterans

Jack Barry Owen Carroll Billy Disch Lou Gehrig Christy Mathewson Branch Rickey Jackie Robinson Joe Sewell George Sisler Charles Teague

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 53031416 LCCN: n82062585 GND: 173800106 NDL: 00652508 SNAC: w6ks6zs6

Works by Christy Mathewson
Christy Mathewson
at Project Gutenberg Works by or about Christy Mathewson
Christy Mathewson
at Internet Archive Works by Christy Mathewson
Christy Mathewson
at LibriVox
LibriVox
(public d

.