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Architonnerre
The Architonnerre
Architonnerre
( Architronito[1]) was a steam-powered cannon, a description of which is found in the papers of Leonardo da Vinci dating to the late 15th century, although he attributes its invention to Archimedes
Archimedes
in the 3rd century BC.[2][3][4] Leonardo's description
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Talent (measurement)
The talent (Latin: talentum, from Ancient Greek: τάλαντον, talanton 'scale, balance, sum') was one of several ancient units of mass, a commercial weight, as well as corresponding units of value equivalent to these masses of a precious metal
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Archimedes
Archimedes
Archimedes
of Syracuse (/ˌɑːrkɪˈmiːdiːz/;[2] Greek: Ἀρχιμήδης; c. 287 – c. 212 BC) was a Greek mathematician, physicist, engineer, inventor, and astronomer.[3] Although few details of his life are known, he is regarded as one of the leading scientists in classical antiquity. Generally considered the greatest mathematician of antiquity and one of the greatest of all time,[4][5] Archimedes
Archimedes
anticipated modern calculus and analysis by applying concepts of infinitesimals and the method of exhaustion to derive and rigorously prove a range of geometrical theorems, including the area of a circle, the surface area and volume of a sphere, and the area under a parabola.[6] Other mathematical achievements include deriving an accurate approximation of pi, defining and investigating the spiral bearing his name, and creating a system using exponentiation for expressing very large numbers
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Étienne-Jean Delécluze
Etienne-Jean Delécluze (French pronunciation: ​[etjɛn ʒɑ̃ dəleklyz]) (26 February 1781 – 12 July 1863) was a French painter and critic. From 1797 on, he was a pupil of Jacques-Louis David, as he describes in his biography of David. As one of his favorite pupils, he was invited to David's last meal in France before going to Brussels in 1816. From 1822 on, he worked as a critic for the Journal des débats. His book Louis David, son école et son temps (Paris, 1857) was quite politically controversial, and he had to rewrite it in order to restore his reputation. He was a maternal uncle of Eugène Viollet-le-Duc and in charge of Viollet-le-Duc's education for some time.[1] References[edit]^ Viollet-le-Duc, Eugène [-Emmanuel] Dictionary of Art Historians. Retrieved 12 February 2015External links[edit]Wikisource has original text related to this article: Étienne-Jean DelécluzeWikimedia Commons has media related to Étienne-Jean Delécluze.
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French Institute
The Institut de France (French pronunciation: ​[ɛ̃stity də fʁɑ̃s], Institute of France) is a French learned society, grouping five académies, the most famous of which is the Académie française. The Institute, located in Paris, manages approximately 1,000 foundations, as well as museums and châteaux open for visit
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L'Artiste
L’Artiste was a weekly illustrated review published in Paris from 1831 to 1904, supplying "the richest single source of contemporary commentary on artists, exhibitions and trends from the Romantic era to the end of the nineteenth century."[1] History[edit] L'Artiste was founded in 1831 by Achille Ricourt with financing provided by the businessman Aimé-Joseph Brame.[2] In 1843, it was purchased by Arsène Houssaye.[3] Originally, L'Artiste addressed fine arts and literature, but by 1859, literature became its primary concern. It later absorbed the Revue de Paris. Important editors included A. Ricourt, H. Delaunay, and Arsène Houssaye
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Steam Engine
A steam engine is a heat engine that performs mechanical work using steam as its working fluid. Steam
Steam
engines are external combustion engines,[2] where the working fluid is separated from the combustion products. Non-combustion heat sources such as solar power, nuclear power or geothermal energy may be used. The ideal thermodynamic cycle used to analyze this process is called the Rankine cycle. In the cycle, water is heated and changes into steam in a boiler operating at a high pressure. When expanded using pistons or turbines mechanical work is done. The reduced-pressure steam is then exhausted to the atmosphere, or condensed and pumped back into the boiler. In general usage, the term steam engine can refer to either complete steam plants (including boilers etc.) such as railway steam locomotives and portable engines, or may refer to the piston or turbine machinery alone, as in the beam engine and stationary steam engine
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Cannon
A cannon (plural: cannon or cannons) is a type of gun classified as artillery that launches a projectile using propellant. In the past, gunpowder was the primary propellant before the invention of smokeless powder in the 19th century. Cannon
Cannon
vary in caliber, range, mobility, rate of fire, angle of fire, and firepower; different forms of cannon combine and balance these attributes in varying degrees, depending on their intended use on the battlefield. The word cannon is derived from several languages, in which the original definition can usually be translated as tube, cane, or reed
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Boiler
A boiler is a closed vessel in which water or other fluid is heated. The fluid does not necessarily boil
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Syphon
The word siphon (/ˈsaɪfən/ SY-fən;[1] from Ancient Greek: σίφων "pipe, tube", also spelled syphon) is used to refer to a wide variety of devices that involve the flow of liquids through tubes. In a narrower sense, the word refers particularly to a tube in an inverted 'U' shape, which causes a liquid to flow upward, above the surface of a reservoir, with no pump, but powered by the fall of the liquid as it flows down the tube under the pull of gravity, then discharging at a level lower than the surface of the reservoir from which it came. There are two leading theories about how siphons cause liquid to flow uphill, against gravity, without being pumped, and powered only by gravity. The traditional theory for centuries was that gravity pulling the liquid down on the exit side of the siphon resulted in reduced pressure at the top of the siphon
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Sala Delle Asse
The Sala delle Asse
Sala delle Asse
(In English: 'room of the tower' or 'room of the wooden boards'), is the location for a wall and ceiling painting in tempera on plaster, of decorated "intertwining plants with fruits and monochromes of roots and rocks", by Leonardo da Vinci, dating from about 1498 and located in the Castello Sforzesco
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Leonardo's Horse
Leonardo's Horse (also known as Gran Cavallo) is a sculpture that was commissioned of Leonardo da Vinci
Leonardo da Vinci
in 1482 by Duke of Milan
Duke of Milan
Ludovico il Moro, but not completed. It was intended to be the largest equestrian statue in the world, a monument to the duke's father Francesco. Leonardo did extensive preparatory work for it, but produced only a clay model, which was destroyed by French soldiers when they invaded Milan
Milan
in 1499, interrupting the project
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The Battle Of Anghiari (painting)
The Battle of Anghiari (1505) is a lost painting by Leonardo da Vinci, at times referred to as "The Lost Leonardo", which some commentators believe to be still hidden beneath one of the later frescoes in the Salone dei Cinquecento
Salone dei Cinquecento
(Hall of the Five Hundred) in the Palazzo Vecchio, Florence. Its central scene depicted four men riding raging war horses engaged in a battle for possession of a standard, at the Battle of Anghiari in 1440. Many preparatory studies by Leonardo still exist. The composition of the central section is best known through a drawing by Peter Paul Rubens in the Louvre, Paris. This work, dating from 1603 and known as The Battle of the Standard, was based on an engraving of 1553 by Lorenzo Zacchia, which was taken from the painting itself or possibly derived from a cartoon by Leonardo. Rubens succeeded in portraying the fury, the intense emotions and the sense of power that were presumably present in the original painting
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Leonardo Da Vinci
Leonardo di ser Piero da Vinci (Italian: [leoˈnardo di ˌsɛr ˈpjɛːro da (v)ˈvintʃi] ( listen); 15 April 1452 – 2 May 1519), more commonly Leonardo da Vinci
Leonardo da Vinci
or simply Leonardo, was an Italian Renaissance
Italian Renaissance
polymath whose areas of interest included invention, painting, sculpting, architecture, science, music, mathematics, engineering, literature, anatomy, geology, astronomy, botany, writing, history, and cartography. He has been variously called the father of palaeontology, ichnology, and architecture, and is widely considered one of the greatest painters of all time
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