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Wright Flyer
The Wright Flyer
Wright Flyer
(often retrospectively referred to as Flyer I or 1903 Flyer) was the first successful heavier-than-air powered aircraft. It was designed and built by the Wright brothers. They flew it four times on December 17, 1903, near Kill Devil Hills, about four miles south of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, US
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Kitty Hawk, North Carolina
Kitty Hawk is a town in Dare County, North Carolina, and is a part of what is known as North Carolina's Outer Banks.[5] The population was 3,272 at the 2010 Census.[6] It was established in the early 18th century as Chickahawk.Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Demographics 4 Politics 5 Sister city 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] Kitty Hawk became world-famous after the Wright brothers
Wright brothers
made the first controlled powered airplane flights at the Kill Devil Hills, four miles (6 km) south of the town, on December 17, 1903
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Flight Dynamics
Flight
Flight
dynamics is the study of the performance, stability, and control of vehicles flying through the air or in outer space.[1] It is concerned with how forces acting on the vehicle influence its speed and attitude with respect to time. In fixed-wing aircraft, the changing orientation of the vehicle with respect to the local air flow is represented by two critical parameters, angle of attack ("alpha") and angle of sideslip ("beta"). These angles describe the vector direction of airspeed, important because they are the principal source of modulations in the aerodynamic forces and moments applied to the aircraft. Spacecraft flight dy
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Chain Drive
Chain drive
Chain drive
is a way of transmitting mechanical power from one place to another. It is often used to convey power to the wheels of a vehicle, particularly bicycles and motorcycles. It is also used in a wide variety of machines besides vehicles. Most often, the power is conveyed by a roller chain, known as the drive chain or transmission chain,[1] passing over a sprocket gear, with the teeth of the gear meshing with the holes in the links of the chain. The gear is turned, and this pulls the chain putting mechanical force into the system. Another type of drive chain is the Morse chain, invented by the Morse Chain Company of Ithaca, New York, United States. This has inverted teeth.[2] Sometimes the power is output by simply rotating the chain, which can be used to lift or drag objects. In other situations, a second gear is placed and the power is recovered by attaching shafts or hubs to this gear
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North Carolina
As of 2000English 90.70% Spanish 6.18%[2]Demonym North Carolinian (official); Tar Heel
Tar Heel
(colloquial)Capital RaleighLargest city CharlotteLargest metro Charlotte
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Propeller (aircraft)
An aircraft propeller, or airscrew,[1] converts rotary motion from an engine or other power source, into a swirling slipstream which pushes the propeller forwards or backwards
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Dimensional Lumber
Lumber
Lumber
(American English; used only in North America) or timber (used in the rest of the English speaking world) is a type of wood that has been processed into beams and planks, a stage in the process of wood production. Lumber
Lumber
is mainly used for structural purposes but has many other uses as well. There are two main types of lumber. It may be supplied either rough-sawn, or surfaced on one or more of its faces. Besides pulpwood, rough lumber is the raw material for furniture-making and other items requiring additional cutting and shaping
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United States Life-Saving Service
The United States Life-Saving Service
United States Life-Saving Service
was a United States government agency that grew out of private and local humanitarian efforts to save the lives of shipwrecked mariners and passengers. It began in 1848 and ultimately merged with the Revenue Cutter Service
Revenue Cutter Service
to form the United States Coast Guard in 1915. Contents1 Early years 2 Formal structure 3 Merger to create Coast Guard 4 See also 5 References 6 Additional reading 7 External linksEarly years[edit]The Cape Hatteras Life-Saving Station. The Station was in use from 1832 until the 1940s. It was demolished by 1949.The concept of assistance to shipwrecked mariners from shore based stations began with volunteer lifesaving services, spearheaded by the Massachusetts
Massachusetts
Humane Society. It was recognized that only small boats stood a chance in assisting those close to the beach
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Boeing 747
The Boeing
Boeing
747 is an American wide-body commercial jet airliner and cargo aircraft, often referred to by its original nickname, "Jumbo Jet". Its distinctive "hump" upper deck along the forward part of the aircraft has made it one of the most recognizable aircraft,[7] and it was the first wide-body airplane produced. Manufactured by Boeing's Commercial Airplane unit in the United States, the 747 was originally envisioned to have 150 percent greater capacity than the Boeing 707,[8] a common large commercial aircraft of the 1960s
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Berlin Tempelhof Airport
Berlin
Berlin
Tempelhof Airport (German: Flughafen Berlin-Tempelhof) (IATA: THF, ICAO: EDDI) was one of the airports in Berlin, Germany. Situated in the south-central Berlin
Berlin
borough of Tempelhof-Schöneberg, the airport ceased operating in 2008 amid controversy, leaving Tegel and Schönefeld as the two main airports serving the city, with the new Berlin
Berlin
Brandenburg Airport still under construction as of 2018. Tempelhof was designated as an airport by the Ministry of Transport
Transport
on 8 October 1923. The old terminal was originally constructed in 1927. In anticipation of increasing air traffic, the Nazi government began a massive reconstruction in the mid-1930s
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Glenn Curtiss
Glenn Hammond Curtiss (May 21, 1878 – July 23, 1930) was an American aviation and motorcycling pioneer, and a founder of the U.S. aircraft industry. He began his career as a bicycle racer and builder before moving on to motorcycles. As early as 1904, he began to manufacture engines for airships. In 1908, Curtiss joined the Aerial Experiment Association, a pioneering research group, founded by Alexander Graham Bell at Beinn Bhreagh, Nova Scotia, to build flying machines. Curtiss made the first officially witnessed flight in North America, won a race at the world's first international air meet in France, and made the first long-distance flight in the United States. His contributions in designing and building aircraft led to the formation of the Curtiss Aeroplane and Motor Company, now part of Curtiss-Wright Corporation. His company built aircraft for the U.S
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Camber (aerodynamics)
In aeronautics and aeronautical engineering, camber is the asymmetry between the two acting surfaces of an aerofoil, with the top surface of a wing (or correspondingly the front surface of a propeller blade) commonly being more convex (positive camber). An aerofoil that is not cambered is called symmetrical. The benefits of cambering were discovered and first utilized by Sir George Cayley
Sir George Cayley
in the early 19th century.[1]Contents1 Overview 2 Definition2.1 Example – An aerofoil with reflexed camber line3 See also 4 ReferencesOverview[edit] Camber is usually designed into an aerofoil to increase the maximum lift coefficient. This minimizes the stalling speed of aircraft using the aerofoil
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Henri Farman
Henri Farman
Henri Farman
(26 May 1874 – 17 July 1958)[1] was an Anglo-French aviator and aircraft designer and manufacturer with his brother Maurice Farman. His family was British and he took French nationality in 1937.[1]Contents1 Biography 2 See also 3 Notes and references 4 External linksBiography[edit] Born in Paris, France, and given the name Henry, he was the son of a well-to-do British newspaper correspondent working there and his French wife. Farman trained as a painter at the École des Beaux Arts, but quickly become obsessed with the new mechanical inventions that were rapidly appearing at the end of the 19th century. Since his family had money, he was able to pursue this interest as an amateur sportsman
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Alberto Santos-Dumont
Alberto Santos-Dumont
Alberto Santos-Dumont
(Portuguese: [awˈbɛʁtu ˈsɐ̃tuz duˈmõ]; 20 July 1873 – 23 July 1932, usually referred to as simply Santos-Dumont) was a Brazilian inventor and aviation pioneer, one of the very few people to have contributed significantly to the development of both lighter-than-air and heavier-than-air aircraft. The heir of a wealthy family of coffee producers, Santos-Dumont dedicated himself to aeronautical study and experimentation in Paris, where he spent most of his adult life. In his early career he designed, built, and flew hot air balloons and early dirigibles, culminating in his winning the Deutsch de la Meurthe prize
Deutsch de la Meurthe prize
on 19 October 1901 for a flight that rounded the Eiffel Tower
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Great Dayton Flood
The Great Dayton Flood
Flood
of 1913 resulted from flooding by the Great Miami River reaching Dayton, Ohio, and the surrounding area, causing the greatest natural disaster in Ohio
Ohio
history. In response, the General Assembly passed the Vonderheide Act to enable the formation of conservancy districts. The Miami Conservancy District, which included Dayton and the surrounding area, became one of the first major flood control districts in Ohio
Ohio
and the United States.[1] The Dayton flood of March 1913 was caused by a series of severe winter rain storms that hit the Midwest
Midwest
in late March. Within three days, 8–11 inches (200–280 mm) of rain fell throughout the Great Miami River watershed on already saturated soil,[2] resulting in more than 90 percent runoff. The river and its tributaries overflowed
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Roy Knabenshue
Augustus Roy Knabenshue (July 15, 1875 – March 6, 1960) was an American aeronautical engineer and aviator.[1]Contents1 Biography 2 Legacy 3 References 4 Further reading 5 External linksBiography[edit] He was born on July 15, 1875, in Lancaster, Ohio, the son of Salome Matlack and Samuel S. Knabenshue. Samuel Knabenshue, an educator and political writer for the Toledo Blade
Toledo Blade
for many years, served as U.S. consul in Belfast, Ireland, from 1905 to 1909 and as consul general in Tianjin, China, from 1909 to 1914.[2] In 1904, at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, Roy Knabenshue piloted Thomas Scott Baldwin's California Arrow dirigible to a height of 2,000 feet (610 m) and was able to return to the takeoff point.[3] He was the first to make a dirigible flight over New York City
New York City
in 1905.[4] He performed barnstorming and worked as the general manager of the Wright Exhibition Team
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