HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Umbrian
Umbrian is an extinct Italic language formerly spoken by the Umbri
Umbri
in the ancient Italian region of Umbria. Within the Italic languages
Italic languages
it is closely related to the Oscan group and is therefore associated with it in the group of Osco-Umbrian languages. Since that classification was first formulated a number of other languages in ancient Italy
Italy
were discovered to be more closely related to Umbrian. Therefore, a group, the Umbrian languages, was devised to contain them.Contents1 Corpus 2 Alphabet 3 Sample text 4 Notes 5 Bibliography 6 External linksCorpus[edit] Umbrian is known from about 30 inscriptions dated from the 7th through 1st centuries BC. The largest cache by far is the Iguvine Tablets, nine inscribed bronze tablets found in 1444 in an underground chamber at Gubbio
Gubbio
(ancient Iguvium). Two have since disappeared
[...More...]

"Umbrian" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

MultiTree
In combinatorics and order-theoretic mathematics, a multitree may describe either of two equivalent structures: a directed acyclic graph in which the set of nodes reachable from any node form a tree, or a partially ordered set that does not have four items a, b, c, and d forming a diamond suborder with a ≤ b ≤ d and a ≤ c ≤ d but with b and c incomparable to each other (also called a diamond-free poset[1]).Contents1 Equivalence between directed acyclic graph and poset definitions 2 Diamond-free families 3 Applications 4 Related structures 5 ReferencesEquivalence between directed acyclic graph and poset definitions[edit] If G is a directed acyclic graph ("DAG") in which the nodes reachable from each vertex form a tree (or equivalently, if G is a directed graph in which there is at most one directed path between any two nodes, in either direction) then the reachability relation in G forms a diamond-free partial order
[...More...]

"MultiTree" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Linguist List
The LINGUIST List is a major online resource for the academic field of linguistics. It was founded by Anthony Aristar in early 1990 at the University of Western Australia,[1] and is used as a reference by the National Science Foundation
National Science Foundation
in the United States.[2] Its main and oldest feature is the premoderated electronic mailing list, now with thousands of subscribers all over the world, where queries and their summarized results, discussions, journal table of contents, dissertation abstracts, calls for papers, book and conference announcements, software notices and other useful pieces of linguistic information are posted.Contents1 History 2 Services 3 Projects 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Between 1991 and 2013 the resource has been run by Anthony Aristar and Helen Aristar-Dry
[...More...]

"Linguist List" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Latin Script
Latin
Latin
or Roman script is a set of graphic signs (script) based on the letters of the classical Latin
Latin
alphabet, which is derived from a form of the Cumaean Greek version of the Greek alphabet, used by the Etruscans. Several Latin-script alphabets exist which differ in graphemes, collation and phonetic values from the classical Latin
Latin
alphabet. The Latin
Latin
script is the basis of the International Phonetic Alphabet and the 26 most widespread letters are the letters contained in the ISO basic Latin
Latin
alphabet. Latin
Latin
script is the basis for the largest number of alphabets of any writing system[1] and is the most widely adopted writing system in the world (commonly used by about 70% of the world's population)
[...More...]

"Latin Script" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Priest
A priest or priestess (feminine) (/priːst/ from Greek πρεσβύτερος presbýteros through Latin
Latin
presbyter, "elder", or from Old High German
Old High German
priast, prest, from Vulgar Latin
Latin
"provost" "one put over others", from Latin
Latin
praepositus "person placed in charge"), is a religious leader authorized to perform the sacred rituals of a religion, especially as a mediatory agent between humans and one or more deities. They also have the authority or power to administer religious rites; in particular, rites of sacrifice to, and propitiation of, a deity or deities
[...More...]

"Priest" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Religious Law
Religious law
Religious law
refers to ethical and moral codes taught by religious traditions
[...More...]

"Religious Law" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

The Linguist List
The LINGUIST List is a major online resource for the academic field of linguistics. It was founded by Anthony Aristar in early 1990 at the University of Western Australia,[1] and is used as a reference by the National Science Foundation
National Science Foundation
in the United States.[2] Its main and oldest feature is the premoderated electronic mailing list, now with thousands of subscribers all over the world, where queries and their summarized results, discussions, journal table of contents, dissertation abstracts, calls for papers, book and conference announcements, software notices and other useful pieces of linguistic information are posted.Contents1 History 2 Services 3 Projects 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Between 1991 and 2013 the resource has been run by Anthony Aristar and Helen Aristar-Dry
[...More...]

"The Linguist List" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Language Death
In linguistics, language death (also language extinction (the language is no longer spoken) or linguicide[1] (death of a language from natural or political causes), and rarely also glottophagy[2] (absorption or replacement of minor language with major language)) occurs when a language loses its last native speaker. Language
Language
death is a process that affects speech communities where the level of linguistic competence that speakers possess of a given language variety is decreased, eventually resulting in no native or fluent speakers of the variety. Language
Language
death may affect any language idiom, including dialects
[...More...]

"Language Death" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Glottolog
Glottolog
Glottolog
is a bibliographic database of the world's lesser-known languages, developed and maintained first at the former Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, and since 2015 at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Jena, Germany. Glottolog
Glottolog
provides a catalogue of the world's languages and language families, and a bibliography on the world's less-spoken languages
[...More...]

"Glottolog" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
[...More...]

"International Standard Book Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

ISO 639-3
ISO 639-3:2007, Codes for the representation of names of languages – Part 3: Alpha-3 code for comprehensive coverage of languages, is an international standard for language codes in the ISO 639 series. It defines three-letter codes for identifying languages. The standard was published by ISO on 1 February 2007.[1] ISO 639-3 extends the ISO 639-2 alpha-3 codes with an aim to cover all known natural languages
[...More...]

"ISO 639-3" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Writing System
A writing system is any conventional method of visually representing verbal communication. While both writing and speech are useful in conveying messages, writing differs in also being a reliable form of information storage and transfer.[1] The processes of encoding and decoding writing systems involve shared understanding between writers and readers of the meaning behind the sets of characters that make up a script. Writing
Writing
is usually recorded onto a durable medium, such as paper or electronic storage, although non-durable methods may also be used, such as writing on a computer display, on a blackboard, in sand, or by skywriting. The general attributes of writing systems can be placed into broad categories such as alphabets, syllabaries, or logographies. Any particular system can have attributes of more than one category
[...More...]

"Writing System" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garb
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Todi
Todi
Todi
is a town and comune (municipality) of the province of Perugia (region of Umbria) in central Italy. It is perched on a tall two-crested hill overlooking the east bank of the river Tiber, commanding distant views in every direction. In the 1990s, Richard S. Levine, a professor of architecture described Todi
Todi
as the model sustainable city, because of its scale and its ability to reinvent itself over time. After that, the Italian press reported on Todi
Todi
as the world's most livable city.[1]The Duomo in the sloping Piazza del Popolo.Contents1 History 2 Main sights2.1 The Cathedral 2.2 Palazzo del Popolo 2.3 Palazzo del Capitano 2.4 Palazzo dei Priori 2.5 Palazzo Vescovile 2.6 Other sights3 Sports3.1 A.S.D. Todi
A.S.D

[...More...]

"Todi" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Spoleto
Spoleto
Spoleto
(Latin Spoletium) is an ancient city in the Italian province of Perugia
Perugia
in east-central Umbria
Umbria
on a foothill of the Apennines. It is 20 km (12 mi) S. of Trevi, 29 km (18 mi) N. of Terni, 63 km (39 mi) SE of Perugia; 212 km (132 mi) SE of Florence; and 126 km (78 mi) N of Rome.Contents1 History 2 Main sights2.1 Ancient and lay buildings 2.2 Churches3 Culture 4 Sport 5 Twin towns – sister cities 6 Frazioni 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] Spoleto
Spoleto
was situated on the eastern branch of the Via Flaminia, which forked into two roads at Narni
Narni
and rejoined at Forum Flaminii, near Foligno. An ancient road also ran hence to Nursia. The Ponte Sanguinario of the 1st century BC still exists
[...More...]

"Spoleto" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Assisi
Assisi
Assisi
(Italian pronunciation: [asˈsiːzi], from the Latin: Asisium) is a town and comune of Italy
Italy
in the Province of Perugia
Province of Perugia
in the Umbria
Umbria
region, on the western flank of Monte Subasio. It is generally regarded as the birthplace of the Latin poet Propertius, born around 50–45 BC. It is the birthplace of St. Francis, who founded the Franciscan
Franciscan
religious order in the town in 1208, and St
[...More...]

"Assisi" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.