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Ulm Minster
Ulm
Ulm
Minster (German: Ulmer Münster) is a Lutheran
Lutheran
church located in Ulm, State of Baden-Württemberg
Baden-Württemberg
(Germany). Until the eventual completion of Sagrada Familia
Sagrada Familia
in Barcelona, Spain, it will remain the tallest church in the world,[3] and the 5th tallest structure built before the 20th century, with a steeple measuring 161.5 metres (530 ft).[3] Although sometimes referred to as Ulm
Ulm
Cathedral
Cathedral
because of its great size, the church is not a cathedral as it has never been the seat of a bishop. Though the towers and all decorative elements are of stone masonry, attracting the attention of visitors, most of the walls, including the façades of the nave and choir, actually consist of visible brick. Therefore, the building is sometimes referred to as a brick church
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German Language
No official regulation ( German orthography
German orthography
regulated by the Council for German Orthography[4]). Language
Language
codesISO 639-1 deISO 639-2 ger
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Reichenau Monastery
Reichenau Island
Island
is an island in Lake Constance
Lake Constance
in southern Germany. It lies almost due west of the city of Konstanz, between the Gnadensee and the Untersee, two parts of Lake Constance. With a total land surface of 4.3 square kilometres and a circumference of 11 kilometres, the island is 4.5 kilometres long and 1.5 kilometres wide at its greatest extent. The highest point, the Hochwart, stands some 43 metres above the lake surface and 438.7 metres above mean sea level. Reichenau is connected to the mainland by a causeway, completed in 1838, which is intersected between the ruins of Schopflen Castle and the eastern end of Reichenau Island
Island
by a 10-metre-wide and 95-metre long waterway, the Bruckgraben
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Frauenkirche, Munich
The Frauenkirche (Full name: German: Dom zu Unserer Lieben Frau, English: Cathedral of Our Dear Lady) is a church in the Bavarian city of Munich that serves as the cathedral of the Archdiocese of Munich and Freising and seat of its Archbishop. It is a landmark and is considered a symbol of the Bavarian capital city. Although called "Münchner Dom" (Munich Cathedral) on its website and URL, the church is always referred to as "Frauenkirche" by locals. The church towers are widely visible because of local height limits. According to the narrow outcome of a local plebiscite, city administration prohibits buildings with a height exceeding 99 m in the city center. Since November 2004, this prohibition has been provisionally extended outward and as a result, no buildings may be built in the city over the aforementioned height
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Munich
Munich
Munich
(/ˈmjuːnɪk/; German: München, pronounced [ˈmʏnçn̩] ( listen),[2] Austro-Bavarian: Minga [ˈmɪŋ(ː)ɐ]) is the capital and the most populated city in the German state of Bavaria, on the banks of the River Isar
Isar
north of the Bavarian Alps
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Gdańsk
Gdańsk
Gdańsk
(Polish pronunciation: [ɡdaɲsk] ( listen), English: /ɡəˈdaɪnsk, -ˈdɑːnsk, -ˈdænsk/[1]; German: Danzig [ˈdantsɪç] ( listen), English: /ˈdænsɪɡ/) is a Polish city on the Baltic coast
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Neu-Ulm
Neu- Ulm
Ulm
is the capital of the Neu- Ulm
Ulm
district and a town in Swabia, Bavaria. Neighbouring towns include Ulm, Senden, Pfaffenhofen an der Roth, Holzheim, Nersingen
Nersingen
and Elchingen. The population is 51,110 (30 June 2005).Contents1 History 2 Coat of arms 3 Districts 4 Politics 5 Education and science 6 Personalities6.1 Born in Neu-Ulm 6.2 Others7 International relations 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit] The modern history of Neu- Ulm
Ulm
began with the change of the sovereignty over the city of Ulm
Ulm
in 1810 from the Kingdom of Bavaria
Bavaria
to the Kingdom of Württemberg. The Danube
Danube
became the boundary between Bavaria
Bavaria
and Württemberg. Land on the right bank of the Danube
Danube
thus remained under Bavarian sovereignty
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Bavaria
Anthem: Bayernhymne  (German) "Hymn of Bavaria"Coordinates: 48°46′39″N 11°25′52″E / 48.77750°N 11.43111°E / 48.77750; 11.43111Country GermanyCapital MunichGovernment • Body Landtag of Bavaria • Minister-President Markus Söder
Markus Söder
(CSU – Christian Social Union of Bavaria) • Governing party CSU • Bundesrat votes 6 (of 69)Area • Total 70,550.19 km2 (27,239.58 sq mi)Population (2016-12-31)[1
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Alps
The Alps
Alps
(/ælps/; French: Alpes [alp]; German: Alpen [ˈalpn̩]; Italian: Alpi [ˈalpi]; Romansh: Alps; Slovene: Alpe [ˈáːlpɛ]) are the highest and most extensive mountain range system that lies entirely in Europe,[2][note 1] stretching approximately 1,200 kilometres (750 mi) across eight Alpine countries
Alpine countries
(from west to east): France, Switzerland, Italy, Monaco, Liechtenstein, Austria, Germany, and Slovenia.[3] The mountains were formed over tens of millions of years as the African and Eurasian tectonic plates collided. Extreme shortening caused by the event resulted in marine sedimentary rocks rising by thrusting and folding into high mountain peaks such as Mont Blanc
Mont Blanc
and the Matterhorn. Mont Blanc
Mont Blanc
spans the French–Italian border, and at 4,810 m (15,781 ft) is the highest mountain in the Alps
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Säntis
At 2,501.9 metres above sea level, Säntis
Säntis
is the highest mountain in the Alpstein
Alpstein
massif of northeastern Switzerland. It is also the culminating point of the whole Appenzell
Appenzell
Alps, between Lake Walen
Lake Walen
and Lake Constance. Shared by three cantons, the mountain is a highly visible landmark thanks to its exposed northerly position within the Alpstein
Alpstein
massif. As a consequence, houses called Säntisblick (English: Säntis
Säntis
view) can be found in regions as far away as the Black Forest
Black Forest
in Germany. Säntis
Säntis
is among the most prominent summits in the Alps and the most prominent summit in Europe with an observation deck on the top.[2] The panorama from the summit is spectacular
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Zugspitze
The Zugspitze, (German pronunciation: [tsukʃpɪtsə]) at 2,962 m (9,718 ft) above sea level, is the highest peak of the Wetterstein Mountains
Wetterstein Mountains
as well as the highest mountain in Germany. It lies south of the town of Garmisch-Partenkirchen, and the Austria– Germany
Germany
border runs over its western summit. South of the mountain is the Zugspitzplatt, a high karst plateau with numerous caves
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Charles IV, Holy Roman Emperor
Charles IV (Czech: Karel IV., German: Karl IV., Latin: Carolus IV; 14 May 1316 – 29 November 1378[1]), born Wenceslaus,[2] was a King of Bohemia
Bohemia
and the first King of Bohemia
King of Bohemia
to also become Holy Roman Emperor. He was a member of the House of Luxembourg
House of Luxembourg
from his father's side and the House of Přemyslid
House of Přemyslid
from his mother's side, which he emphasised, because it gave him two saints as direct ancestors. He was the eldest son and heir of King John of Bohemia, who died at the Battle of Crécy
Battle of Crécy
on 26 August 1346. His mother, Elizabeth of Bohemia, was the sister of King Wenceslas III, the last of the male Přemyslid rulers of Bohemia. Charles inherited the County of Luxembourg
Luxembourg
from his father and was elected king of the Kingdom of Bohemia
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Charlemagne
Charlemagne
Charlemagne
(/ˈʃɑːrləmeɪn/) or Charles
Charles
the Great[a] (2 April 742[1][b] – 28 January 814), numbered Charles
Charles
I, was King of the Franks
Franks
from 768, King of the Lombards
Lombards
from 774 and Holy Roman Emperor from 800. He united much of western and central Europe during the early Middle Ages. He was the first recognised emperor to rule from western Europe since the fall of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
three centuries earlier.[2] The expanded Frankish state that Charlemagne founded is called the Carolingian
Carolingian
Empire
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Parler Family
Parler (Czech: Parléř [ˈparlɛːr̝̊]) was a surname of a family of German architects and sculptors from the 14th century.[1] Founder of the dynasty, Heinrich Parler, came from Cologne, but later lived and worked in Gmünd.[2] His descendants were working in various parts of central Europe, especially in Bohemia. The family name was derived from the word Parlier, meaning "foreman".[3] Notable members of the family include: Heinrich Parler
Heinrich Parler
(c. 1300 – c. 1370),[4] also known as Heinrich of Gmünd, founder of the dynastyJohannes von Gmünd (John Parler the older) (1330-po 1359), oldest son of Heinrich Parler, father of Heinrich IV
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Schwäbisch Gmünd
Schwäbisch Gmünd
Schwäbisch Gmünd
(German pronunciation: [ˈʃvɛːbɪʃ ˈɡmʏnt], until 1934: Gmünd) is a town in the eastern part of the German state of Baden-Württemberg. With a population of around 60,000, the town is the second largest in the Ostalb district and the whole East Württemberg region after Aalen. The town is a Große Kreisstadt
Große Kreisstadt
since 1956, i.e. a chief town under district administration; it was the administrative capital of its own rural district until the local government reorganisation on 1 January 1973. Schwäbisch Gmünd
Schwäbisch Gmünd
was a self-ruling free imperial city from the 13th century until its annexation to Württemberg in 1802.Contents1 Geography 2 History2.1 U.S
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