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Tributaries
A tributary[1] or affluent[2] is a stream or river that flows into a larger stream or main stem (or parent) river or a lake.[3] A tributary does not flow directly into a sea or ocean.[4] Tributaries and the main stem river drain the surrounding drainage basin of its surface water and groundwater, leading the water out into an ocean. A confluence, where two or more bodies of water meet together, usually refers to the joining of tributaries. The opposite to a tributary is a distributary, a river or stream that branches off from and flows away from the main stream.[5] Distributaries are most often found in river deltas.Contents1 Terminology 2 Ordering and enumeration 3 Gallery 4 See also 5 ReferencesTerminology[edit]Looking downstream, the Shenandoah River
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Tributary (other)
Tributary may refer to the following:Tributary, a stream or river which flows into another river (a parent river) or body of water but which may not flow directly into the sea Tributary (ballet) by Robert La Fosse and Robert Garland, 2000 Tributary, Georgia, an unincorporated community in Douglas County Tributary port, a locally terminated network connection in a (synchronous optical networking) transport network Tributary stateThis disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Tributary. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the
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Xiliao River
The Xiliao or West Liao River
Liao River
(simplified Chinese: 西辽河; traditional Chinese: 西遼河; pinyin: Xīliáo Hé) is a river in Inner Mongolia
Inner Mongolia
and Liaoning
Liaoning
province, in northeast China. Its source is the Xilamulun River in Inner Mongolia. It is one of the headwaters of the Liao River. Coordinates: 42°58′53″N 123°32′50″E / 42.98139°N 123.54722°E / 42.98139; 123.54722 The Xiliao or "Western Liao River", historically also known as Huang River (潢水), is the largest tributary of the Liao River. The Xiliao runs 449 kilometres (279 mi), and drains a basin of 136,000 square kilometres (53,000 sq mi). The Xiliao River
Xiliao River
is formed by the confluence of the Laoha River (老哈河) flowing from the southwest, and the Xar Moron River (西拉木伦河) flowing from the west
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Tree Structure
A tree structure or tree diagram is a way of representing the hierarchical nature of a structure in a graphical form. It is named a "tree structure" because the classic representation resembles a tree, even though the chart is generally upside down compared to an actual tree, with the "root" at the top and the "leaves" at the bottom. A tree structure is conceptual, and appears in several forms. For a discussion of tree structures in specific fields, see Tree
Tree
(data structure) for computer science: insofar as it relates to graph theory, see tree (graph theory), or also tree (set theory)
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Data Structure
In computer science, a data structure is a particular way of organizing and storing data in a computer so that it can be accessed and modified efficiently.[1][2][3] More precisely, a data structure is a collection of data values, the relationships among them, and the functions or operations that can be applied to the data.[4]Contents1 Usage 2 Implementation 3 Examples 4 Language support 5 See also 6 References 7 Bibliography 8 Further reading 9 External linksUsage[edit] Data structures can implement one or more particular abstract data types (ADT), which specify the operations that can be performed on a data structure and the computational complexity of those operations. In comparison, a data structure is a concrete implementation of the space provided by an ADT.[citation needed] Different kinds of data structures are suited to different kinds of applications, and some are highly specialized to specific tasks
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River Fork
A river fork is a place where a river divides into two parts.[1] This is usually two forks joining, to create a single river, such as the Nile River being created at the confluence of the Blue Nile and White Nile, though the term can be used when a single river bifurcates into two distributary flows, as does for example the Barak River.[2] See also[edit]River morphology Tributary River deltaReferences[edit]^ "Definition of fork". www.merriam-webster.com.  ^ "River and Drainage System". Banglapedia. 5 May 2014. This article relating to topography is a stub
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Atlantic Ocean
The Atlantic Ocean
Ocean
is the second largest of the world's oceans with a total area of about 106,460,000 square kilometers (41,100,000 square miles).[2][3] It covers approximately 20 percent of the Earth's surface and about 29 percent of its water surface area. It separates the "Old World" from the "New World". The Atlantic Ocean
Ocean
occupies an elongated, S-shaped basin extending longitudinally between Eurasia
Eurasia
and Africa to the east, and the Americas to the west. As one component of the interconnected global ocean, it is connected in the north to the Arctic
Arctic
Ocean, to the Pacific Ocean
Ocean
in the southwest, the Indian Ocean
Ocean
in the southeast, and the Southern Ocean
Southern Ocean
in the south (other definitions describe the Atlantic as extending southward to Antarctica)
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Hun River (Liao River Tributary)
A river is a natural flowing watercourse, usually freshwater, flowing towards an ocean, sea, lake or another river. In some cases a river flows into the ground and becomes dry at the end of its course without reaching another body of water. Small rivers can be referred to using names such as stream, creek, brook, rivulet, and rill. There are no official definitions for the generic term river as applied to geographic features,[1] although in some countries or communities a stream is defined by its size. Many names for small rivers are specific to geographic location; examples are "run" in some parts of the United States, "burn" in Scotland and northeast England, and "beck" in northern England. Sometimes a river is defined as being larger than a creek,[2] but not always: the language is vague.[3] Rivers are part of the hydrological cycle
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Taizi River
The Taizi River
Taizi River
(Chinese: 太子河) is a major river in the Liaoning province of Northeastern China. The river was historically also known as Yan River (衍水) or Liang River (梁水). It was originally the third largest tributary of the Liao River, southern Northeast's principal river, draining with the neighboring Hun River into a confluence known as "Trident River" near Haicheng, until a river engineering project in 1958 cut off the eastern distributary of the river delta from the Liao River's main course, making the Hun River and Taizi Rivers a separate system that drains into the Bohai Bay independently from the Liao River. However, both sister rivers are still usually considered a part of the Liao River
Liao River
system because they are both within the historical Liao River
Liao River
drainage basin. Name[edit] The name Taizi literally means "crown prince"
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Xar Moron River
The Xar Moron river (Mongolian: Shar mörön Шар мөрөн, "Yellow River";[1] Chinese: 西拉木伦河, 西拉沐沦河, or 西拉沐伦河; pinyin: Xilamulun) is a river in Inner Mongolia, in northeast China. It flows through the grasslands of that region, forming a valley that is hospitable to both farming and herding. The valley was once home to the Khitan people. The Xar Moron is the source of the Xiliao River
Xiliao River
(西辽河), which in turn is one of the headwaters of the Liao River. The musical instrument xiqin (奚琴), the ancestor of China's huqin family of bowed string instruments, is believed to have originated here with the Khitans, who were formerly called Xi (奚) by the Chinese.^ the X is used roughly like in Hanyu Pinyin
Pinyin
here, i.e. to present an "sh"-like sound. The cyrillic spelling, as used in Outer Mongolia, would be Шар Мөрөн
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Strahler Stream Order
In mathematics, the Strahler number or Horton–Strahler number of a mathematical tree is a numerical measure of its branching complexity. These numbers were first developed in hydrology by Robert E. Horton (1945) and Arthur Newell Strahler (1952, 1957); in this application, they are referred to as the Strahler stream order and are used to define stream size based on a hierarchy of tributaries. They also arise in the analysis of L-systems and of hierarchical biological structures such as (biological) trees and animal respiratory and circulatory systems, in register allocation for compilation of high-level programming languages and in the analysis of social networks
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Huai River
The Huai River, formerly romanized as the Hwai, is a major river in China. It is located about midway between the Yellow River
Yellow River
and Yangtze,[1] the two largest rivers in China, and like them runs from west to east. Historically draining directly into the Yellow Sea, floods have changed the course of the river such that it is now a major tributary of the Yangtze. The Huai is notoriously vulnerable to flooding. The Huai River- Qin Mountains
Qin Mountains
line is generally regarded as the geographical dividing line between Northern and southern China. This line approximates the 0 degree January isotherm and the 800 mm isohyet in China
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Estuary
An estuary is a partially enclosed coastal body of brackish water with one or more rivers or streams flowing into it, and with a free connection to the open sea.[1] Estuaries form a transition zone between river environments and maritime environments. They are subject both to marine influences—such as tides, waves, and the influx of saline water—and to riverine influences—such as flows of fresh water and sediment. The mixing of sea water and fresh water provide high levels of nutrients both in the water column and in sediment, making estuaries among the most productive natural habitats in the world.[2] Most existing estuaries formed during the Holocene
Holocene
epoch with the flooding of river-eroded or glacially scoured valleys when the sea level began to rise about 10,000–12,000 years ago.[3] Estuaries are typically classified according to their geomorphological features or to water-circulation patterns
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Merriam-Webster
Merriam–Webster, Incorporated, is an American company that publishes reference books, especially known for its dictionaries. In 1828, George and Charles Merriam founded the company as G & C Merriam Co. in Springfield, Massachusetts. In 1843, after Noah Webster died, the company bought the rights to An American Dictionary
Dictionary
of the English Language from Webster's estate. All Merriam–Webster dictionaries trace their lineage to this source. In 1964, Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.
Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.
acquired Merriam–Webster, Inc. as a subsidiary. The company adopted its current name in 1982.[1][2]Contents1 Origins1.1 Noah Webster 1.2 Merriam as publisher2 Services 3 Pronunciation guides 4 Writing entries 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksOrigins[edit] Noah Webster[edit] In 1806, Webster published his first dictionary, A Compendious Dictionary
Dictionary
of the English Language
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garb
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