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Theravada
Theravāda
Theravāda
(/ˌθɛrəˈvɑːdə/; Pali, literally "school of the elder monks") is a branch of Buddhism
Buddhism
that uses the Buddha's teaching preserved in the Pāli Canon
Pāli Canon
as its doctrinal core
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Ledi Sayadaw
A sayadaw (Burmese: ဆရာတော်, IPA: [sʰəjàdɔ̀]; lit. royal teacher and alternatively spelt hsayadaw, sayado, sayāḍo or sayāḍaw) is a Burmese Buddhist title used to reference the senior monk or abbot of a monastery. Some distinguished sayadaws would often be referred to as a sayadawgyi (ဆရာတော်ကြီး, as a sign of reverence. The terms "sayadaw" and "sayadawgyi" originally corresponded to the senior monks who taught the former Burmese kings. These sayadaws may be influential teachers of Buddhism
Buddhism
and also important meditation practitioners. They usually are abbots of monasteries or monastery networks with a large number of resident monks and a lay following. In Buddhism
Buddhism
in Burma, several honorific terms exist for Buddhist monks, reflecting their achievements and how many vassas they have passed
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Buddhism In India
Buddhism
Buddhism
is a world religion, which arose in and around the ancient Kingdom of Magadha
Magadha
(now in Bihar, India), and is based on the teachings of Siddhārtha Gautama[note 1] who was deemed a "Buddha" ("Awakened One"[4])
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Abhidhammattha-sangaha
Abhidhammattha-sangaha (Pali) is a Buddhist
Buddhist
text attributed to Acariya Anuruddha;[1] it is a commentary on the Abhidharma
Abhidharma
of the Theravada tradition. Abhidhamma is literally known as Higher Doctrine, Aththa is used here to represent English multi-significant word Thing (Not Meaning) and Sangaha simply means Compendium. It briefly mentions, in order, the seven treatises (Prakaranas) of the Abhidhamma Pitaka:Dhammasangani - Classification of Dhammas Vibhanga - Divisions Dhathukatha - Discussion with reference to Elements Puggalapannatthi - Designation of Individuals Kathavatthu - Points of Controversy Yamaka - The Book of Pairs Patthana - The Book of Causal RelationsThe prefix Abhi is used in the sense of preponderant, great, excellent, sublime, distinct, etc
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Dharmachakra
The dharmachakra (IAST: dharmacakra; Pali
Pali
dhammacakka; "Wheel of the Dharma") is one of the Ashtamangala[1] of Indian religions
Indian religions
such as Jainism, Buddhism, and Hinduism
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Moggaliputta-Tissa
Moggaliputta-Tissa
Moggaliputta-Tissa
(ca. 327 BC – 247 BC), (born in Pataliputra, Magadha
Magadha
(now Patna, India) was a Buddhist monk and scholar who lived in the 3rd century BC. David Kalupahana sees him as a predecessor of Nagarjuna
Nagarjuna
in being a champion of the Middle Way
Middle Way
and a reviver of the original philosophical ideals of the Buddha.[1] He was the spiritual teacher of the Mauryan Emperor Ashoka, and his son Mahinda, who brought Buddhism
Buddhism
to Sri Lanka. Moggaliputta-Tissa also presided over the Third Buddhist Council. According to the Mahavamsa, he had consented himself to be reincarnated as a human in order to chair the council, on the request of the arahants who has presided over the second. He was the son of Mogalli of Pataliputra, as Tissa
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Parakramabahu I
Parākramabāhu I ( Pali
Pali
Mahā Parākaramabāhu 1123–1186) was king of the Kingdom of Polonnaruwa
Polonnaruwa
from 1153-86. During his reign from the capital city of Polonnaruwa, he unified the three lesser kingdoms of the island, becoming one of the last monarchs in Sri Lankan history to do so. He oversaw the expansion and beautification of his capital, constructed extensive irrigation systems, reorganized the country's army, reformed Buddhist practices, encouraged the arts and undertook military campaigns in South India
South India
and Burma
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Sanghamitta
Saṅghamittā (Saṅghamitrā in Sanskrit) was the eldest daughter of Emperor Ashoka
Ashoka
(304 BC – 232 BC) and his first wife, Devi. Together with her brother Mahinda, she entered an order of Buddhist
Buddhist
monks. The two siblings later went to Sri Lanka
Sri Lanka
to spread the teachings of Buddha at the request of King Devanampiya Tissa (250 BC – 210 BC) who was a contemporary of Ashoka. Ashoka
Ashoka
was initially reluctant to send his daughter on an overseas mission. However, because of the insistence of Sangamitra herself, he finally agreed
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Fourth Buddhist Council
Fourth Buddhist Council is the name of two separate Buddhist council meetings. The first one was held in the 1st century BC, in Sri Lanka. In this fourth Buddhist council the Theravadin
Theravadin
Pali Canon
Pali Canon
was for the first time committed to writing, on palm leaves
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Three Jewels
สรณะ, ที่พึ่ง ที่ระลึก RTGS: sarana, thi phueng thi raluekVietnamese Quy yGlossary of BuddhismBuddhists take refuge in the Three Jewels
Three Jewels
or Triple Gem (also known as the "Three Refuges"). The Three Jewels
Three Jewels
are:the Buddha, the fully enlightened one the Dharma, the teachings expounded by the Buddha the Sangha, the monastic order of Buddhism
Buddhism
that practice the DharmaRefuge is common to all major schools of Buddhism
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Kammaṭṭhāna
In Buddhism, kammaṭṭhāna is a Pali
Pali
word (Sanskrit: karmasthana) which literally means the place of work. Its original meaning was someone's occupation (farming, trading, cattle-tending, etc.). It has several distinct but related usages, all having to do with Buddhist meditation. Its most basic meaning is as a word for meditation. In Burma senior meditation practitioners are known as "kammatthanacariyas" (meditation masters)
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Vibhajjavada
Vibhajyavāda (Sanskrit; Pāli: Vibhajjavāda; traditional Chinese: 分別說部; ; pinyin: fēnbiéshuō-bù) was a group of Sthavira Buddhist schools of early Buddhism, who rejected the Sarvastivada teachings at the Third Buddhist council
Third Buddhist council
(ca. 250 BCE).Contents1 Nomenclature and etymology 2 History 3 Sectarian views 4 See also 5 References 6 Sources 7 Further reading 8 External linksNomenclature and etymology[edit] The word Vibhajyavāda may be parsed into vibhajya, loosely meaning "dividing", "analyzing" and vāda holding the semantic field: "doctrine", "teachings".[1] According to Andrew Skilton, the analysis of phenomena (Skt
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Mahinda (buddhist Monk)
Mahinda ( Sanskrit
Sanskrit
Mahendra; born third century BCE in Ujjain, modern Madhya Pradesh, India) was a Buddhist monk depicted in Buddhist sources as bringing Buddhism
Buddhism
to Sri Lanka.[1] He was the first-born son of the Mauryan emperor Ashoka
Ashoka
from his wife Devi and the elder brother of Sanghamitra. Ashoka
Ashoka
named him Mahendra, meaning "conqueror of the world". But Mahendra, inspired by his mother, became a Buddhist monk.Contents1 Historical sources 2 Biography 3 Significance and legacy 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistorical sources[edit] The Dipavamsa
Dipavamsa
and the Mahavamsa, Sri Lanka's two great religious chronicles, contain accounts of Mahinda travelling to Sri Lanka
Sri Lanka
and converting King Devanampiyatissa.[2] These are the primary sources for accounts of his life and deeds
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Anagarika Dharmapala
Anagārika Dharmapāla (Pali: Anagārika, [əˈnəɡɑːrɪkə]; Sinhalese: Anagarika, lit., Sinhalese: අනගාරික ධර්මපාල; 17 September 1864 – 29 April 1933) was a Sri Lankan (Sinhalese) Buddhist revivalist and writer. He was the first global Buddhist missionary. He was one of the founding contributors of non-violent Sinhalese Buddhist nationalism and Buddhism. He was also a pioneer in the revival of Buddhism
Buddhism
in India
India
after it had been virtually extinct there for several centuries, and he was the first Buddhist in modern times to preach the Dharma
Dharma
in three continents: Asia, North America, and Europe. Along with Henry Steel Olcott and Helena Blavatsky, the creators of the Theosophical Society, he was a major reformer and revivalist of Sinhala Buddhism
Buddhism
and an important figure in its western transmission
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Samsara (Buddhism)
ᠣᠷᠴᠢᠯᠠᠩ, орчлон (orchilang, orchlon)Sinhalese සංසාරය (sansāra)Tibetan འཁོར་བ་ (khor ba)Thai วัฏสงสารVietnamese Luân hồiGlossary of BuddhismPart of a series onBuddhismHistoryTimeline Gautama BuddhaCouncils Later BuddhistsDharma ConceptsFour Noble TruthsFive Aggregates ImpermanenceSuffering Non-selfDependent OriginationMiddle Way Emptiness KarmaRebirth Saṃsāra CosmologyBuddhist textsBuddhavacana Tripiṭaka Mahayana
Mahayana
Sutras Pāli Canon T
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Sthaviravada
The Sthavira nikāya ( Sanskrit
Sanskrit
"Sect of the Elders"; traditional Chinese: 上座部; ; pinyin: Shàngzuò Bù) was one of the early Buddhist schools. They split from the majority Mahāsāṃghikas at the time of the Second Buddhist council.[1]Contents1 Scholarly views1.1 Origin 1.2 Language 1.3 Legacy2 Relationship to Theravāda2.1 Modern scholarly accounts 2.2 Ancient Indian scholarly accounts 2.3 Theravādin accounts3 See also 4 References 5 External linksScholarly views[edit] Origin[edit] The Sthavira nikāya ( Sanskrit
Sanskrit
"Sect of the Elders"; traditional Chinese: 上座部; ; pinyin: Shàngzuò Bù) was one of the early Buddhist schools
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