HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

The Great Gatsby
The Great Gatsby
The Great Gatsby
is a 1925 novel written by American author F. Scott Fitzgerald that follows a cast of characters living in the fictional town of West and East Egg on prosperous Long Island
Long Island
in the summer of 1922. The story primarily concerns the young and mysterious millionaire Jay Gatsby
Jay Gatsby
and his quixotic passion and obsession for the beautiful former debutante Daisy Buchanan
[...More...]

"The Great Gatsby" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Prohibition In The United States
Prohibition
Prohibition
in the United States was a nationwide constitutional ban on the production, importation, transportation, and sale of alcoholic beverages from 1920 to 1933. During the 19th century, alcoholism, family violence, and saloon-based political corruption prompted activists, led by pietistic Protestants, to end the alcoholic beverage trade to cure the ill society and weaken the political opposition. One result was that many communities in the late 19th and early 20th centuries introduced alcohol prohibition, with the subsequent enforcement in law becoming a hotly debated issue. Prohibition
Prohibition
supporters, called "drys", presented it as a victory for public morals and health. Promoted by the "dry" crusaders, the movement was led by pietistic Protestants and social Progressives
Progressives
in the Prohibition, Democratic, and Republican parties
[...More...]

"Prohibition In The United States" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Masterpiece
Masterpiece, magnum opus (Latin, great work) or chef-d’œuvre (French, master of work, plural chefs-d’œuvre) in modern use is a creation that has been given much critical praise, especially one that is considered the greatest work of a person's career or to a work of outstanding creativity, skill, profundity, or workmanship. Historically, a "masterpiece"' was a work of a very high standard produced to obtain membership of a guild or academy in various areas of the visual arts and crafts.Federico Zuccari, Two Painter's Apprentices, 1609
[...More...]

"Masterpiece" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Midwestern United States
The Midwestern United States, also referred to as the American Midwest, Middle West, or simply the Midwest, is one of four geographic regions defined by the United States
United States
Census Bureau. It occupies the northern central part of the United States
United States
of America.[2] It was officially named the North Central region by the Census Bureau until 1984.[3] It is located between the Northeastern U.S.
Northeastern U.S.
and the Western U.S., with Canada
Canada
to its north and the Southern U.S.
Southern U.S.
to its south. The Census Bureau's definition consists of 12 states in the north central United States: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin
[...More...]

"Midwestern United States" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Bond (finance)
In finance, a bond is an instrument of indebtedness of the bond issuer to the holders. The most common types of bonds include municipal bonds and corporate bonds. The bond is a debt security, under which the issuer owes the holders a debt and (depending on the terms of the bond) is obliged to pay them interest (the coupon) or to repay the principal at a later date, termed the maturity date.[1] Interest
Interest
is usually payable at fixed intervals (semiannual, annual, sometimes monthly). Very often the bond is negotiable, that is, the ownership of the instrument can be transferred in the secondary market. This means that once the transfer agents at the bank medallion stamp the bond, it is highly liquid on the secondary market.[2] Thus a bond is a form of loan or IOU: the holder of the bond is the lender (creditor), the issuer of the bond is the borrower (debtor), and the coupon is the interest
[...More...]

"Bond (finance)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Rum-running
Rum-running, or bootlegging, is the illegal business of transporting (smuggling) alcoholic beverages where such transportation is forbidden by law. Smuggling
Smuggling
is usually done to circumvent taxation or prohibition laws within a particular jurisdiction. The term rum-running is more commonly applied to smuggling over water; bootlegging is applied to smuggling over land. It is believed that the term "boot-legging" originated during the American Civil War, when soldiers would sneak liquor into army camps by concealing pint bottles within their boots or beneath their trouser legs
[...More...]

"Rum-running" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Flapper
Flappers were a generation of young Western women in the 1920s
1920s
who wore short skirts, bobbed their hair, listened to jazz, and flaunted their disdain for what was then considered acceptable behavior. Flappers were seen as brash for wearing excessive makeup, drinking, treating sex in a casual manner, smoking, driving automobiles, and otherwise flouting social and sexual norms.[1] Flappers are icons of the Roaring Twenties, the social, political turbulence and increased transatlantic cultural exchange that followed the end of World War I, as well as the export of American jazz culture to Europe.Contents1 Etymology 2 Influen
[...More...]

"Flapper" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Modern Library
The Modern Library is an American publishing company. Founded in 1917 by Albert Boni
Albert Boni
and Horace Liveright as an imprint of their publishing company Boni & Liveright, it was purchased in 1925 by Bennett Cerf and Donald Klopfer. Random House began in 1927 as a subsidiary of the Modern Library but eventually overtook its parent to become the parent company of what then only became an imprint of Random House.[1]Contents1 Recent history 2 Modern Library lists 3 References 4 Bibliography 5 External linksRecent history[edit] The Modern Library originally published only hardbound books.[2] In 1950, it began publishing the Modern Library College Editions, a forerunner of its current series of paperback classics
[...More...]

"Modern Library" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

North Dakota
North Dakota
North Dakota
( /- dəˈkoʊtə/ ( listen)) is a U.S. state in the midwestern and northern regions of the United States. It is the nineteenth largest in area, the fourth smallest by population, and the fourth most sparsely populated of the 50 states. North Dakota
North Dakota
was admitted as the 39th state to the Union on November 2, 1889
[...More...]

"North Dakota" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

World War II
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
[...More...]

"World War II" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Extramarital Affair
An affair is a sexual relationship, romantic friendship, or passionate attachment between two people without the attached person's significant other knowing.Part of a series onLoveTypes of loveAffection Bonding Broken heart Compassionate love Conjugal love Courtly lovetroubadoursFalling in love Free love FriendshipromanticInterpersonal relationship Intimacy Limerence Love
Love
addiction Lov
[...More...]

"Extramarital Affair" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Military Officer
An officer is a member of an armed force or uniformed service who holds a position of authority. In its broadest sense, the term "officer" includes non-commissioned officers and warrant officers. However, when used without further detail, the term "officer" almost always refers to commissioned officers, the more senior portion of a force who derive their authority from a commission from the head of state of a sovereign nation-state.Contents1 Numbers 2 Legal relevance 3 Terminological details in the U.S. 4 Commissioned officers4.1 United Kingdom 4.2 United States4.2.1 Other U.S. officer commissioning programs, active and discontinued4.3 Commonwealth of Nations5 Non-commissioned officers 6 Warrant officers 7 Officer ranks and accommodation 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksNumbers[edit]An Indonesian army
Indonesian army
officer serving as a ceremonial field commanderThe proportion of officers varies greatly
[...More...]

"Military Officer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Jazz Age
The Jazz
Jazz
Age was a period in the 1920s
1920s
and 1930s
1930s
in which jazz music and dance styles rapidly gained nationwide popularity. The Jazz
Jazz
Age's cultural repercussions were primarily felt in the United States, the birthplace of jazz. Originating in New Orleans
New Orleans
as a fusion of African and European music, jazz played a significant part in wider cultural changes in this period, and its influence on pop culture continued long afterwards. The Jazz
Jazz
Age is often referred to in conjunction with the Roaring Twenties. American author F. Scott Fitzgerald
F. Scott Fitzgerald
is widely credited with coining the term, first using it in the title of his 1922 short story collection, Tales of the Jazz
Jazz
Age
[...More...]

"Jazz Age" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Idealism
In philosophy, Idealism
Idealism
is the group of metaphysical philosophies which assert that reality, or reality as humans can know it, is fundamentally mental, mentally constructed, or otherwise immaterial. Epistemologically, idealism manifests as a skepticism about the possibility of knowing any mind-independent thing. In contrast to Materialism, Idealism
Idealism
asserts the primacy of consciousness as the origin and prerequisite of material phenomena. According to this view consciousness exists before and is the pre-condition of material existence. Consciousness
Consciousness
creates and determines the material and not vice versa. Idealism
Idealism
believes consciousness and mind to be the origin of the material world and aims to explain the existing world according to these principles. Idealism
Idealism
theories are mainly divided into two groups
[...More...]

"Idealism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

World War I
Allied victoryCentral Powers' victory on the Eastern Front nullified by defeat on the Western Front Fall of the German, Russian, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian empires Russian Civil War
Russian Civil War
and foundation of the Soviet Union Formation of new countries in Europe
Europe
and the Middle East Transfer of German colonies
German colonies
and regions of the former Ottoman Empire to other powers Establishment of the League of Nations
[...More...]

"World War I" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Decadence
The word decadence, which at first meant simply "decline" in an abstract sense, is now most often used to refer to a perceived decay in standards, morals, dignity, religious faith, or skill at governing among the members of the elite of a very large social structure, such as an empire or nation state. By extension, it may refer to a decline in art, literature, science, technology, and work ethics, or (very loosely) to self-indulgent behaviour. Usage of the term frequently implies moral censure, or an acceptance of the idea, met with throughout the world since ancient times, that such declines are objectively observable and that they inevitably precede the destruction of the society in question; for this reason, modern historians use it with caution. The word originated in Medieval Latin (dēcadentia), appeared in 16th-century French, and entered English soon afterwards
[...More...]

"Decadence" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.