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Speculative Theism
The Right Hegelians
Right Hegelians
(German: Rechtshegelianer), Old Hegelians (Althegelianer), or the Hegelian Right (die Hegelsche Rechte), were those followers of German philosopher Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel
Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel
in the early 19th century who took his philosophy in a politically and religiously conservative direction. They are typically contrasted with the Young Hegelians, who interpreted Hegel's political philosophy to support innovations in politics or religion.[1]Contents1 Overview 2 Speculative theism 3 References 4 External linksOverview[edit] Hegel's historicism holds that both ideas and institutions can only be understood by understanding their history. Throughout his life, Hegel claimed to be an orthodox Lutheran. He devoted considerable attention to the Absolute, his term for the infinite Spirit responsible for the totality of reality—something like God, though not the God of classical theism
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Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel
Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel
Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel
(/ˈheɪɡəl/;[15] German: [ˈɡeːɔɐ̯k ˈvɪlhɛlm ˈfʁiːdʁɪç ˈheːɡəl]; August 27, 1770 – November 14, 1831) was a German philosopher and an important figure of German idealism. He achieved wide renown in his day and, while primarily influential within the continental tradition of philosophy, has become increasingly influential in the analytic tradition as well.[16] Although Hegel remains a divisive figure, his canonical stature within Western philosophy
Western philosophy
is universally recognized. Hegel's principal achievement is his development of a distinctive articulation of idealism sometimes termed "absolute idealism",[17] in which the dualisms of, for instance, mind and nature and subject and object are overcome. His philosophy of spirit conceptually integrates psychology, the state, history, art, religion, and philosophy
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Statism
In political science, statism is the belief that the state should control either economic or social policy, or both, to some degree.[1] While the term "statism" has been in use since the 1850s, it gained significant usage in American political discourse throughout the 1930s and 1940s
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Young Hegelians
The Young Hegelians
Young Hegelians
(German: Junghegelianer), or Left Hegelians (Linkshegelianer), or the Hegelian Left (die Hegelsche Linke), were a group of German intellectuals who, in the decade or so after the death of Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel
Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel
in 1831, reacted to and wrote about his ambiguous legacy. The Young Hegelians
Young Hegelians
drew on his idea that the purpose and promise of history was the total negation of everything conducive to restricting freedom and reason; and they proceeded to mount radical critiques, first of religion and then of the Prussian political system
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German Language
No official regulation ( German orthography
German orthography
regulated by the Council for German Orthography[4]). Language
Language
codesISO 639-1 deISO 639-2 ger (B) deu (T)ISO 639-3 Variously: deu – German gmh&#
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Germany
Coordinates: 51°N 9°E / 51°N 9°E / 51; 9Federal Republic
Republic
of Germany Bundesrepublik Deutschland (German)[a]FlagCoat of armsMotto:  "Einigkeit und Recht und Freiheit" (de facto) "Unity and Justice and Freedom"Anthem: "Deutschlandlied" (third verse only)[b] "Song of Germany"Location of  Germany  (dark green) – in Europe  (green & dark grey) – in the European Union  (green)Location of
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Conservative
Conservatism
Conservatism
is a political and social philosophy promoting traditional social institutions in the context of culture and civilization. The central tenets of conservatism include tradition, human imperfection, organic society, hierarchy and authority and property rights.[1] Conservatives seek to preserve a range of institutions such as monarchy, religion, parliamentary government and property rights with the aim of emphasizing social stability and continuity[2] while the more extreme elements called reactionaries oppose modernism and seek a return to "the way things were".[3][4] The first established use of the term in a political context originated in 1818 with François-René de Chateaubriand[5] during the period of Bourbon restoration
Bourbon restoration
that sought to roll back the policies of the French Revolution
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Political Philosophy
Political philosophy, or political theory, is the study of topics such as politics, liberty, justice, property, rights, law, and the enforcement of laws by authority: what they are, why (or even if) they are needed, what, if anything, makes a government legitimate, what rights and freedoms it should protect and why, what form it should take and why, what the law is, and what duties citizens owe to a legitimate government, if any, and when it may be legitimately overthrown, if ever. In a vernacular sense, the term "political philosophy" often refers to a general view, or specific ethic, political belief or attitude, about politics, synonymous to the term "political ideology". Political philosophy
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Historicism
Historicism
Historicism
is the idea of attributing meaningful significance to space and time, such as historical period, geographical place, and local culture. Historicism
Historicism
tends to be hermeneutical because it values cautious, rigorous, and contextualized interpretation of information; or relativist, because it rejects notions of universal, fundamental and immutable interpretations.[1] The approach varies from individualist theories of knowledge such as empiricism and rationalism, which neglect the role of traditions. The term "historicism" (Historismus) was coined by German philosopher Karl Wilhelm Friedrich Schlegel.[2] Over time it has developed different and somewhat divergent meanings. Elements of historicism appear in the writings of French essayist Michel de Montaigne (1533–1592) and Italian philosopher G. B. Vico
G. B

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Orthodoxy
Orthodoxy
Orthodoxy
(from Greek ορθοδοξία, orthodoxía – "right opinion")[1] is adherence to correct or accepted creeds, especially in religion.[2] In the Christian sense the term means "conforming to the Christian faith as represented in the creeds of the early Church."[3] The first seven Ecumenical Councils were held between the years of 325 and 787 with the aim of formalizing accepted doctrines. In some English speaking countries, Jews who adhere to all the traditions and commandments as legislated in the
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Lutheran
Lutheranism
Lutheranism
is a major branch of Protestant
Protestant
Christianity
Christianity
which identifies with the theology of Martin Luther
Martin Luther
(1483–1546), a German friar, ecclesiastical reformer and theologian. Luther's efforts to reform the theology and practice of the Catholic Church launched the Protestant Reformation
Protestant Reformation
in the German-speaking territories of the Holy Roman Empire
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The Absolute
In philosophy, the concept of the Absolute is closely related to that of God
God
in monotheism, albeit not necessarily referring to a personal deity. The term was not in use in ancient or medieval philosophy, but closely related to the description of God
God
as "Pure Actuality" (Actus Purus) in scholasticism. It was introduced in modern philosophy, notably by Hegel, for "the sum of all being, actual and potential".[1] The term has since also been adopted in perennial philosophy,[2]Contents1 Three conceptions of the Absolute1.1 Cross-cultural conception of the Absolute 1.2 Interpreting the Absolute1.2.1 Within religious traditions2 Relation of humanity to the Absolute2.1 Experiencing the Absolute 2.2 Representing the Absolute3 See also 4 Notes 5 ReferencesThree conceptions of the Absolute[edit]This article or section possibly contains synthesis of material which does not verifiably mention or relate to the main topic
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Sovereign State
A sovereign state is, in international law, a nonphysical juridical entity that is represented by one centralized government that has sovereignty over a geographic area
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Nation
A nation is a stable community of people, formed on the basis of a common language, territory, economic life, ethnicity or psychological make-up manifested in a common culture
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British Idealism
A species of absolute idealism, British idealism
British idealism
was a philosophical movement that was influential in Britain from the mid-nineteenth century to the early twentieth century. The leading figures in the movement were T. H. Green (1836–1882), F. H. Bradley (1846–1924), and Bernard Bosanquet (1848–1923). They were succeeded by the second generation of J. M. E. McTaggart
J. M. E. McTaggart
(1866–1925), H. H. Joachim (1868–1938), J. H. Muirhead (1855–1940), and R. G. Collingwood (1889-1943). The last major figure in the tradition was G. R. G. Mure (1893–1979). Doctrines of early British idealism
British idealism
so provoked the young Cambridge philosophers G. E. Moore
G. E

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Ideal (ethics)
An ideal is a principle or value that one actively pursues as a goal, usually in the context of ethics, and one's prioritization of ideals can serve to indicate the extent of one's dedication to each. For example, someone who espouses the ideal of honesty, but is willing to lie to protect a friend, demonstrates not only devotion to friendship, but also belief in its supersedence of honesty in importance.Contents1 In applied ethics 2 In politics 3 Idols and heroes 4 Ideal and virtue 5 Relative ideal 6 See also 7 Sources 8 External linksIn applied ethics[edit] In some theories of applied ethics, such as that of Rushworth Kidder, there is importance given to such orders as a way to resolve disputes. In law, for instance, a judge is sometimes called on to resolve the balance between the ideal of truth, which would advise hearing out all evidence, and the ideal of fairness. In politics[edit] In politics ideals play a pivotal role
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