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Sega
Sega
Sega
Games Co., Ltd. (Japanese: 株式会社セガゲームス, Hepburn: Kabushiki gaisha
Kabushiki gaisha
Sega
Sega
Gēmusu), originally short for Service Games and officially styled as SEGA, is a Japanese multinational video game developer and publisher headquartered in Tokyo, Japan, with offices around the world. Sega
Sega
developed and manufactured numerous home video game consoles from 1983 to 2001, but after financial losses incurred from its Dreamcast
Dreamcast
console, the company restructured to focus on providing software as a third-party developer
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Romanization
Romanization
Romanization
(also spelled romanisation: see spelling differences), in linguistics, is the conversion of writing from a different writing system to the Roman (Latin) script, or a system for doing so. Methods of romanization include transliteration, for representing written text, and transcription, for representing the spoken word, and combinations of both
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Subsidiary
A subsidiary, subsidiary company or daughter company[1][2][3] is a company that is owned or controlled by another company, which is called the parent company, parent, or holding company.[4][5] The subsidiary can be a company, corporation, or limited liability company. In some cases it is a government or state-owned enterprise. In some cases, particularly in the music and book publishing industries, subsidiaries are referred to as imprints. In the United States railroad industry, an operating subsidiary is a company that is a subsidiary but operates with its own identity, locomotives and rolling stock
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Stereoscopic
Stereoscopy
Stereoscopy
(also called stereoscopics, or stereo imaging) is a technique for creating or enhancing the illusion of depth in an image by means of stereopsis for binocular vision[2]. The word stereoscopy derives from Greek στερεός (stereos), meaning 'firm, solid', and σκοπέω (skopeō), meaning 'to look, to see'.[3][4] Any stereoscopic image is called a stereogram. Originally, stereogram referred to a pair of stereo images which could be viewed using a stereoscope. Most stereoscopic methods present two offset images separately to the left and right eye of the viewer. These two-dimensional images are then combined in the brain to give the perception of 3D depth
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United States Dollar
 United States  East Timor[2][Note 1]  Ecuador[3][Note 2]  El Salvador[4]  Federated States of Micronesia  Marshall Islands  Palau  Panama[Note 3]  Zimbabwe[Note 4]3 non-U.S
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United States Air Force
Department of Defense Department of the Air ForceHeadquarters The Pentagon Arlington County, Virginia, U.S.Motto(s) "Aim High ... Fly-Fight-Win"[7] "Integrity first, Service before self, Excellence in all we do"[8]Colors Ultramarine
Ultramarine
blue, Golden yellow[9]          March The U.S. Air Force
U.S. Air Force
 Play (help·info)Anniversaries 18 SeptemberEngagementsSee listMexican Expedition (As Aviation Section, U.S. Signal Corps) World War I
World War I
(As Aviation Section, U.S. Signal Corps
Aviation Section, U.S

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World War II
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
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Honolulu
Honolulu
Honolulu
(/ˌhɒnəˈluːluː/;[6] Hawaiian: [honoˈlulu]) is the capital and largest city of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Hawaii. It is an unincorporated part of and the county seat of the City and County of Honolulu
Honolulu
on the island of O'ahu.[a] The city is the main gateway to Hawai'i and a major portal into the United States. The city is also a major hub for international business, military defense, as well as famously being host to a diverse variety of east-west and Pacific culture, cuisine, and traditions. Honolulu
Honolulu
is the most remote city of its size in the world[8] and is the westernmost major U.S. city
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London
London
London
(/ˈlʌndən/ ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city of England
England
and the United Kingdom.[7][8] Standing on the River Thames
River Thames
in the south east of the island of Great Britain, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. It was founded by the Romans, who named it Londinium.[9] London's ancient core, the City of London, largely retains its 1.12-square-mile (2.9 km2) medieval boundaries
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San Francisco
 CaliforniaCSA San Jose–San Francisco–OaklandMetro San Francisco–Oakland–HaywardMission June 29, 1776[1]Incorporated April 15, 1850[2]Founded by José Joaquín Moraga Francisco PalóuNamed for St
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List Of Business Entities
A business entity is an entity that is formed and administered as per corporate law in order to engage in business activities, charitable work, or other activities allowable. Most often, business entities are formed to sell a product or a service. There are many types of business entities defined in the legal systems of various countries. These include corporations, cooperatives, partnerships, sole traders, limited liability company and other specifically permitted and labelled types of entities. The specific rules vary by country and by state or province
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Hepburn Romanization
Hepburn romanization
Hepburn romanization
(ヘボン式ローマ字, Hebon-shiki Rōmaji, 'Hepburn-type Roman letters')[1] is a system for the romanization of Japanese, that uses the Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
to write the Japanese language. It is used by most foreigners learning to spell Japanese in the Latin alphabet[2] and by the Japanese for romanizing personal names, geographical locations, and other information such as train tables, road signs, and official communications with foreign countries.[3] Largely based on English writing conventions, consonants closely correspond to the English pronunciation and vowels approximate the Italian pronunciation.[1] The Hepburn style (Hebon-shiki) was developed in the late 19th century by an international commission that was formed to develop a unified system of romanization
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Japanese Language
Japanese (日本語, Nihongo, [ɲihoŋɡo] or [ɲihoŋŋo] ( listen)) is an East Asian language spoken by about 126 million people, primarily in Japan, where it is the national language. It is a member of the Japonic (or Japanese-Ryukyuan) language family, and its relation to other languages, such as Korean, is debated. Japanese has been grouped with language families such as Ainu, Austroasiatic, and the now-discredited Altaic, but none of these proposals has gained widespread acceptance. Little is known of the language's prehistory, or when it first appeared in Japan. Chinese documents from the 3rd century recorded a few Japanese words, but substantial texts did not appear until the 8th century. During the Heian period
Heian period
(794–1185), Chinese had considerable influence on the vocabulary and phonology of Old Japanese
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Multinational Corporation
A multinational corporation (MNC) or worldwide enterprise[5] is a corporate organization that owns or controls production of goods or services in at least one country other than its home country.[6] A multinational corporation can also be referred to as a multinational enterprise (MNE), a transnational enterprise (TNE), a transnational corporation (TNC), an international corporation, or a stateless corporation.[7] There are subtle but real differences between these three labels, as well as multinational corporation and worldwide enterprise. Multinational corporations are subject to criticisms for lacking ethical standards, and that this shows up in how they evade ethical laws and leverage their own business agenda with capital, and even the military backing of their own wealthy host nation-states.Contents1 Overview 2 Theoretical background 3 Transnational corporations 4 Multinational enterprise 5
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Division (business)
A division of a business, sometimes called a business sector, is one of the parts into which a business, organization or company is divided.[1] The divisions are distinct parts of that business. If these divisions are all part of the same company, then that company is legally responsible for all of the obligations and debts of the divisions. However, in a large organization, various parts of the business may be run by different subsidiaries, and a business division may include one or many subsidiaries. Each subsidiary is a separate legal entity owned by the primary business or by another subsidiary in the hierarchy. Often a division operates under a separate name and is the equivalent of a corporation or limited liability company obtaining a fictitious name or "doing business as" certificate and operating a business under that fictitious name. Companies often set up business units to operate in divisions prior to the legal formation of subsidiaries. Generally, only an "entity", e.g
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Kabushiki Gaisha
A kabushiki gaisha (Japanese: 株式会社, lit. "share company") [kabɯɕi̥ki ɡaiɕa] or kabushiki kaisha, commonly abbreviated KK, is a type of company (会社, kaisha) defined under the Companies Act of Japan. Often translated as "stock company", "joint-stock company", or "stock corporation".Contents1 Usage in language 2 History 3 Formation3.1 Receipt of capital4 Structure4.1 Board of directors 4.2 Auditing and reporting 4.3 Officers5 Other legal issues5.1 Taxation 5.2 Derivative litigation6 See also 7 Footnotes 8 External linksUsage in language[edit] In English, kabushiki kaisha is usually used while the original Japanese pronunciation is kabushiki gaisha due to rendaku. A kabushiki kaisha must include "株式会社" in its name (Article 6, paragraph 2 of the Companies Act). In a company name, "株式会社" can be used as a prefix (e.g
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