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SR.N4
The SR.N4
SR.N4
( Saunders-Roe
Saunders-Roe
Nautical 4)[1] hovercraft (also known as the Mountbatten-class hovercraft) was a large passenger and vehicle carrying hovercraft built by the British Hovercraft
Hovercraft
Corporation (BHC). BHC was formed by the merger of Saunders-Roe
Saunders-Roe
and Vickers Supermarine in 1966. Work on the SR.N4
SR.N4
began in 1965 and the first trials took place in early 1968. Power was provided by four Rolls-Royce Proteus marine turboshaft engines each driving its own lift fan and pylon-mounted steerable propulsion propeller. The SR.N4
SR.N4
was the largest hovercraft built to that date, designed to carry 254 passengers in two cabins besides a four-lane automobile bay which held up to 30 cars. Cars were driven from a bow ramp just forward of the cockpit / wheelhouse
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Dover
Dover
Dover
(/ˈdoʊvər/) is a town and major ferry port in the home county of Kent, in South East England. It faces France
France
across the Strait of Dover, the narrowest part of the English Channel, and lies south-east of Canterbury
Canterbury
and east of Maidstone. The town is the administrative centre of the Dover District
Dover District
and home of the Dover
Dover
Calais
Calais
ferry through the Port
Port
of Dover. The surrounding chalk cliffs are known as the White Cliffs of Dover. Archaeological
Archaeological
finds have revealed that the area has always been a focus for peoples entering and leaving Britain
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Yoke
A yoke is a wooden beam normally used between a pair of oxen or other animals to enable them to pull together on a load when working in pairs, as oxen usually do; some yokes are fitted to individual animals. There are several types of yoke, used in different cultures, and for different types of oxen. A pair of oxen may be called a yoke of oxen, and yoke is also a verb, as in "to yoke a pair of oxen". Other animals that may be yoked include horses, mules, donkeys, and water buffalo.Contents1 Etymology 2 Neck or bow yoke 3 Head yoke 4 Withers
Withers
yoke 5 Comparison 6 Single yoke 7 Symbolism 8 Gallery 9 See also 10 References 11 External linksEtymology[edit]Look up *yugóm in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.The word "yoke" is believed to derive from Proto-Indo-European *yugóm (yoke), from verb *yeug- (join, unite)
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Turboprop
A turboprop engine is a turbine engine that drives an aircraft propeller.[1] In contrast to a turbojet, the engine's exhaust gases do not contain enough energy to create significant thrust, since almost all of the engine's power is used to drive the propeller. In its simplest form a turboprop consists of an intake, compressor, combustor, turbine, and a propelling nozzle. Air is drawn into the intake and compressed by the compressor. Fuel is then added to the compressed air in the combustor, where the fuel-air mixture then combusts. The hot combustion gases expand through the turbine. Some of the power generated by the turbine is used to drive the compressor. The rest is transmitted through the reduction gearing to the propeller. Further expansion of the gases occurs in the propelling nozzle, where the gases exhaust to atmospheric pressure
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Dowty Rotol
Dowty Rotol
Dowty Rotol
was a British engineering company based in Staverton, Gloucestershire and specialised in the manufacture of propellers and propeller components. Following a series of changes of ownership, the original Dowty Rotol
Dowty Rotol
facility at Staverton is now owned by the Safran Group, operating as part of its Messier-Bugatti-Dowty
Messier-Bugatti-Dowty
Landing Gear subsidiary. Propeller design and manufacture was moved a few hundred metres down the road when the company was split into business units under its Dowty ownership in the early 1990s
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Hydraulics
Hydraulics
Hydraulics
(from Greek: Υδραυλική) is a technology and applied science using engineering, chemistry, and other sciences involving the mechanical properties and use of liquids. At a very basic level, hydraulics is the liquid counterpart of pneumatics, which concerns gases. Fluid mechanics
Fluid mechanics
provides the theoretical foundation for hydraulics, which focuses on the applied engineering using the properties of fluids. In its fluid power applications, hydraulics is used for the generation, control, and transmission of power by the use of pressurized liquids
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Transmission (mechanics)
A transmission is a machine in a power transmission system, which provides controlled application of the power. Often the term transmission refers simply to the gearbox that uses gears and gear trains to provide speed and torque conversions from a rotating power source to another device.[1][2] In British English, the term transmission refers to the whole drivetrain, including clutch, gearbox, prop shaft (for rear-wheel drive), differential, and final drive shafts. In American English, however, the term refers more specifically to the gearbox alone, and detailed usage differs.[note 1] The most common use is in motor vehicles, where the transmission adapts the output of the internal combustion engine to the drive wheels. Such engines need to operate at a relatively high rotational speed, which is inappropriate for starting, stopping, and slower travel. The transmission reduces the higher engine speed to the slower wheel speed, increasing torque in the process
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Fin
A fin is a thin component or appendage attached to a larger body or structure. Fins typically function as foils that produce lift or thrust, or provide the ability to steer or stabilize motion while traveling in water, air, or other fluid media. Fins are also used to increase surface areas for heat transfer purposes, or simply as ornamentation.[1][2] Fins first evolved on fish as a means of locomotion. Fish
Fish
fins are used to generate thrust and control the subsequent motion. Fish, and other aquatic animals such as cetaceans, actively propel and steer themselves with pectoral and tail fins
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Variable-pitch Propeller
A controllable-pitch propeller (CPP) or variable-pitch propeller is a type of propeller with blades that can be rotated around their long axis to change the blade pitch. Reversible propellers—those where the pitch can be set to negative values—can also create reverse thrust for braking or going backwards without the need to change the direction of shaft revolution.Contents1 Aircraft 2 Ships 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksAircraft[edit]One of a C-130J Super Hercules' 6 bladed Dowty Rotol
Dowty Rotol
R391 composite controllable- and reversible-pitch propellers.A Hamilton Standard
Hamilton Standard
variable-pitch propeller on a 1943 model Stinson V77 ReliantPropellers whose blade pitch could be adjusted while the aircraft was on the ground were used by a number of early aviation pioneers,[1] including A. V. Roe and Louis Breguet. In 1919 L. E
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Bridge (nautical)
The bridge of a ship is the room or platform from which the ship can be commanded. When a ship is underway, the bridge is manned by an officer of the watch aided usually by an able seaman acting as lookout. During critical maneuvers the captain will be on the bridge, often supported by an officer of the watch, an able seaman on the wheel and sometimes a pilot, if required.Contents1 Evolution 2 Configuration2.1 Bridge wing 2.2 Navigation station3 See also 4 References 5 External linksEvolution[edit]Wheelhouse on a tugboat, topped with a flying bridge.The compass platform of a British destroyer in the Battle of the Atlantic during the Second World War
Second World War
with central binnacle and the voice pipes to belowdecks.Traditionally, sailing ships were commanded from the quarterdeck, aft of the mainmast
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Decca Radar
The Decca Radar
Radar
company was a British manufacturer of radar systems. History[edit] The Decca Company, a British gramophone manufacturer that, as Decca Records, released records under the Decca label, contributed to the British war effort during the Second World War
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Rudder
A rudder is a primary control surface used to steer a ship, boat, submarine, hovercraft, aircraft, or other conveyance that moves through a fluid medium (generally air or water). On an aircraft the rudder is used primarily to counter adverse yaw and p-factor and is not the primary control used to turn the airplane. A rudder operates by redirecting the fluid past the hull (watercraft) or fuselage, thus imparting a turning or yawing motion to the craft. In basic form, a rudder is a flat plane or sheet of material attached with hinges to the craft's stern, tail, or after end. Often rudders are shaped so as to minimize hydrodynamic or aerodynamic drag. On simple watercraft, a tiller—essentially, a stick or pole acting as a lever arm—may be attached to the top of the rudder to allow it to be turned by a helmsman. In larger vessels, cables, pushrods, or hydraulics may be used to link rudders to steering wheels
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Joystick
A joystick is an input device consisting of a stick that pivots on a base and reports its angle or direction to the device it is controlling. A joystick, also known as the control column, is the principal control device in the cockpit of many civilian and military aircraft, either as a center stick or side-stick. It often has supplementary switches to control various aspects of the aircraft's flight. Joysticks are often used to control video games, and usually have one or more push-buttons whose state can also be read by the computer. A popular variation of the joystick used on modern video game consoles is the analog stick. Joysticks are also used for controlling machines such as cranes, trucks, underwater unmanned vehicles, wheelchairs, surveillance cameras, and zero turning radius lawn mowers
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Seaspeed
Seaspeed
Seaspeed
was the joint hovercraft operations of British Rail
British Rail
(under
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Salt
Table salt or common salt is a mineral composed primarily of sodium chloride (NaCl), a chemical compound belonging to the larger class of salts; salt in its natural form as a crystalline mineral is known as rock salt or halite. Salt
Salt
is present in vast quantities in seawater, where it is the main mineral constituent. The open ocean has about 35 grams (1.2 oz) of solids per litre, a salinity of 3.5%. Salt
Salt
is essential for life in general, and saltiness is one of the basic human tastes. Salt
Salt
is one of the oldest and most ubiquitous food seasonings, and salting is an important method of food preservation. Some of the earliest evidence of salt processing dates to around 8,000 years ago, when people living in the area of present-day Romania boiled spring water to extract salts; a salt-works in China dates to approximately the same period
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Dover, England
Dover
Dover
(/ˈdoʊvər/) is a town and major ferry port in the home county of Kent, in South East England. It faces France
France
across the Strait of Dover, the narrowest part of the English Channel, and lies south-east of Canterbury
Canterbury
and east of Maidstone. The town is the administrative centre of the Dover District
Dover District
and home of the Dover
Dover
Calais
Calais
ferry through the Port
Port
of Dover. The surrounding chalk cliffs are known as the White Cliffs of Dover. Archaeological
Archaeological
finds have revealed that the area has always been a focus for peoples entering and leaving Britain
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