HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Rumpelstiltskin
Rumpelstiltskin
Rumpelstiltskin
is a fairytale popularly associated with Germany (where he is known as Rumpelstilzchen). The tale was one collected by the Brothers Grimm
Brothers Grimm
in the 1812 edition of Children's and Household Tales. According to researchers at Durham University
Durham University
and the Universidade Nova de Lisboa, the story originated around 4,000 years ago.[1][2]Contents1 Plot 2 Variants 3 Name origins 4 Names used in translations 5 Appearances in media5.1 Literature 5.2 Comics 5.3 Music 5.4 Television 5.5 Film 5.6 Games 5.7 Psychology6 References 7 External linksPlot[edit] In order to appear superior, a miller lies to the king, telling him that his daughter can spin straw into gold
[...More...]

"Rumpelstiltskin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Rümpel
Rümpel is a municipality in the district of Stormarn, in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany.v t eTowns and municipalities in StormarnAhrensburg Ammersbek Bad Oldesloe Badendorf Bargfeld-Stegen Bargteheide Barnitz Barsbüttel Braak Brunsbek Delingsdorf Elmenhorst Feldhorst Glinde Grabau Grande Grönwohld Großensee Großhansdorf Hamberge Hamfelde Hammoor Heidekamp Heilshoop Hohenfelde Hoisdorf Jersbek Klein Wesenberg Köthel Lasbek Lütjensee Meddewade Mönkhagen Neritz Nienwohld Oststeinbek Pölitz Rausdorf Rehhorst Reinbek Reinfeld Rethwisch Rümpel Siek Stapelfeld Steinburg Tangstedt Todendorf Travenbrück Tremsbüttel Trittau Wesenberg Westerau Witzhave ZarpenReferences[edit]^ "Statistikamt Nord – Bevölkerung der Gemeinden in Schleswig-Holstein 4. Quartal 2016] (XLS-file)". Statistisches Amt für Hamburg und Schleswig-Holstein (in German). Authority controlWorldCat Identities VIAF: 249376031 GND: 4379082-3This Stormarn location article is a stub
[...More...]

"Rümpel" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Swedish Language
Swedish ( svenska (help·info) [²svɛnːska]) is a North Germanic language spoken natively by 9.6 million people, predominantly in Sweden
Sweden
(as the sole official language), and in parts of Finland, where it has equal legal standing with Finnish. It is largely mutually intelligible with Norwegian and to some extent with Danish, although the degree of mutual intelligibility is largely dependent on the dialect and accent of the speaker. Both Norwegian and Danish are generally easier to read than to listen to because of difference in accent and tone when speaking. Swedish is a descendant of Old Norse, the common language of the Germanic peoples
Germanic peoples
living in Scandinavia during the Viking Era
[...More...]

"Swedish Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Hob (folklore)
A hob is a type of small mythological household spirit found in the north and midlands of England, but especially on the Anglo-Scottish border, according to traditional folklore of those regions. They could live inside the house or outdoors. They are said to work in farmyards and thus could be helpful; however, if offended they could become nuisances. The usual way to dispose of a hob was to give them a set of new clothing, the receiving of which would make the creature leave forever. It could, however, be impossible to get rid of the worst hobs.[1]Contents1 Etymology 2 Folklore 3 Modern popular culture 4 See also 5 ReferencesEtymology[edit] "Hob" is simply a rustic name for the countryside goblin, "a piece of rude familiarity to cover up uncertainty or fear". "Hob" is generally explained as a nickname for "Robert".[2] "Hob" is sometimes a generic term given to a goblin, bogle or brownie. Folklore[edit] Hobs have been described as small, hairy, wizened men
[...More...]

"Hob (folklore)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Johann Fischart
Johann Baptist Fischart (c. 1545 – 1591) was a German satirist and publicist.Contents1 Biography 2 Influence 3 Works 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksBiography[edit] Fischart was born, probably, at Strasbourg
Strasbourg
(but according to some accounts at Mainz), in or about the year 1545, and was educated at Worms in the house of Kaspar Scheid, whom in the preface to his Eulenspiegel he mentions as his cousin and preceptor. He appears to have travelled in Italy, the Netherlands, France
France
and England, and on his return to have taken the degree of doctor juris at Basel.[1] Most of his works were written from 1575 to 1581. During this period, he lived with, and was probably associated in the business of, his sister's husband, Bernhard Jobin, a printer at Strasbourg
Strasbourg
who published many of his books
[...More...]

"Johann Fischart" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

François Rabelais
François Rabelais
François Rabelais
(/ˌræbəˈleɪ/;[1] French: [fʁɑ̃swa ʁablɛ]; between 1483 and 1494 – 9 April 1553) was a French Renaissance writer, physician, Renaissance humanist, monk and Greek scholar. He has historically been regarded as a writer of fantasy, satire, the grotesque, bawdy jokes and songs. His best known work is Gargantua and Pantagruel. Because of his literary power and historical importance, Western literary critics consider him one of the great writers of world literature and among the creators of modern European writing.[2] His literary legacy is such that today, the word Rabelaisian has been coined as a descriptive inspired by his work and life
[...More...]

"François Rabelais" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Gargantua And Pantagruel
The Life of Gargantua
Gargantua
and of Pantagruel (French: La vie de Gargantua et de Pantagruel) is a pentalogy of novels written in the 16th century by François Rabelais, which tells of the adventures of two giants, Gargantua
Gargantua
(/ɡɑːrˈɡæntʃuːə/; French: [ɡaʁ.ɡɑ̃.ty.a]) and his son Pantagruel (/pænˈtæɡruːˌɛl, -əl, ˌpæntəˈɡruːəl/; French: [pɑ̃.ta.ɡʁy.ɛl])
[...More...]

"Gargantua And Pantagruel" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Dutch Language
 Aruba  Belgium  Curaçao  Netherlands  Sint Maarten  Suriname Benelux European Union South American Union CaricomRegulated by Nederlandse Taalunie (Dutch Language Union)Language codesISO 639-1 nlISO 639-2 dut (B) nld (T)ISO 639-3 nld Dutch/FlemishGlottolog mode1257[4]Linguasphere 52-ACB-aDutch-speaking world (included are areas of daughter-language Afrikaans)Distribution of the Dutch language
Dutch language
and its dialects in Western EuropeThis article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode
Unicode
characters
[...More...]

"Dutch Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Portuguese Language
Argentina
Argentina
(South America) Indonesia
Indonesia
(Asia)[4][5] Senegal
Senegal
(Africa) South Africa
Africa
(Africa) Namibia
Namibia
(Africa) Uruguay
Uruguay
(South America)[6][7][8]Numerous international organisationsRegulated by International Portuguese Language Institute Academia Brasileira de Letras (Brazil) Academia das Ciências de Lisboa, Classe de Letras (Portugal) Academia Galega da Língua Portuguesa (Galicia) CPLPLanguage codesISO 639-1 ptISO 639-2 porISO 639-3 porGlottolog port1283[9]Linguasphere 51-AAA-a  Native language   Official and administrative language   Cultural or secondary language   Portuguese speaking minorities   Portuguese-based creole languagesThis article contains IPA phonetic symbols
[...More...]

"Portuguese Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Spanish Language
The Spanish language
Spanish language
(/ˈspænɪʃ/ ( listen);  Español (help·info)), also called the Castilian language[4] (/kæˈstɪliən/ ( listen),  castellano (help·info)), is a Western Romance language that originated in the Castile region of Spain
Spain
and today has hundreds of millions of native speakers in Latin
Latin
America and Spain. It is usually considered the world's second-most spoken native language, after Mandarin Chinese.[5][6][7][8][9] Spanish is a part of the Ibero-Romance group of languages, which evolved from several dialects of Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
in Iberia after the collapse of the Western Roman Empire
Western Roman Empire
in the 5th century
[...More...]

"Spanish Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Czech Language
Czech (/tʃɛk/; čeština Czech pronunciation: [ˈtʃɛʃcɪna]), historically also Bohemian[6] (/boʊˈhiːmiən, bə-/;[7] lingua Bohemica in Latin), is a West Slavic language
West Slavic language
of the Czech–Slovak group.[6] Spoken by over 10 million people, it serves as the official language of the Czech Republic. Czech is closely related to Slovak, to the point of mutual intelligibility to a very high degree.[8] Like other Slavic languages, Czech is a fusional language with a rich system of morphology and relatively flexible word order. Its vocabulary has been extensively influenced by Latin[9] and German.[10] The Czech–Slovak group developed within West Slavic
West Slavic
in the high medieval period, and the standardization of Czech and Slovak within the Czech–Slovak dialect continuum emerged in the early modern period
[...More...]

"Czech Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Japanese Language
Japanese (日本語, Nihongo, [ɲihoŋɡo] or [ɲihoŋŋo] ( listen)) is an East Asian language spoken by about 126 million people, primarily in Japan, where it is the national language. It is a member of the Japonic (or Japanese-Ryukyuan) language family, and its relation to other languages, such as Korean, is debated. Japanese has been grouped with language families such as Ainu, Austroasiatic, and the now-discredited Altaic, but none of these proposals has gained widespread acceptance. Little is known of the language's prehistory, or when it first appeared in Japan. Chinese documents from the 3rd century recorded a few Japanese words, but substantial texts did not appear until the 8th century. During the Heian period
Heian period
(794–1185), Chinese had considerable influence on the vocabulary and phonology of Old Japanese
[...More...]

"Japanese Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Russian Language
Russian (Russian: ру́сский язы́к, tr. rússkiy yazýk) is an East Slavic language
East Slavic language
and an official language in Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan
Kyrgyzstan
and many minor or unrecognised territories throughout Eurasia
Eurasia
(particularly in Eastern Europe, the Baltics, the Caucasus, and Central Asia). It is an unofficial but widely spoken language in Latvia, Moldova, Ukraine
Ukraine
and to a lesser extent, the other post-Soviet states.[31][32] Russian belongs to the family of Indo-European languages
Indo-European languages
and is one of the four living members of the East Slavic languages
Slavic languages
(which in turn is part of the larger Balto-Slavic branch)
[...More...]

"Russian Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Danish Language
Danish /ˈdeɪnɪʃ/ ( listen) (dansk pronounced [ˈdanˀsɡ] ( listen); dansk sprog, [ˈdanˀsɡ ˈsbʁɔwˀ]) is a North Germanic language spoken by around six million people, principally in Denmark
Denmark
and in the region of Southern Schleswig
Southern Schleswig
in northern Germany, where it has minority language status.[3] Also, minor Danish-speaking communities are found in Norway, Sweden, Spain, the United States, Canada, Brazil, and Argentina. Due to immigration and language shift in urban areas, around 15–20% of the population of Greenland
Greenland
speak Danish as their home language. Along with the other North Germanic languages, Danish is a descendant of Old Norse, the common language of the Germanic peoples
Germanic peoples
who lived in Scandinavia
Scandinavia
during the Viking Era
[...More...]

"Danish Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Poltergeist
In folklore and parapsychology, a 'poltergeist' (German for "noisy ghost" or "noisy spirit") is a type of ghost or spirit that is responsible for physical disturbances, such as loud noises and objects being moved or destroyed. They are purportedly capable of pinching, biting, hitting, and tripping people. Most accounts of poltergeists describe the movement or levitation of objects such as furniture and cutlery, or noises such as knocking on doors. They have traditionally been described as troublesome spirits who haunt a particular person instead of a specific location. Such alleged poltergeist manifestations have been reported in many cultures and countries including the United States, India‚ Japan, Brazil, Australia, and most European nations
[...More...]

"Poltergeist" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Norwegian Language
no – inclusive code Individual codes: nb – Bokmål nn – NynorskISO 639-2nor – inclusive code Individual codes: nob – Bokmål nno – NynorskISO 639-3 nor – inclusive code Individual codes: nob – Bokmål nno – NynorskGlottolog norw1258[2]Linguasphere 52-AAA-ba to -be; 52-AAA-cf to -cgAreas where Norwegian is spoken, including North Dakota
North Dakota
(where 0.4% of the population speaks Norwegian) and Minnesota
Minnesota
(0.1% of the population) (Data: U.S. Census 2000).This article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode
Unicode
characters
[...More...]

"Norwegian Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.