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PriceWaterhouseCoopers
PricewaterhouseCoopers
PricewaterhouseCoopers
(doing business as PwC) is a multinational professional services network headquartered in London, United Kingdom. It is the second largest professional services firm in the world,[5] and is one of the Big Four auditors, along with Deloitte, EY and KPMG.[6] Vault Accounting 50 has ranked PwC as the most prestigious accounting firm in the world for seven consecutive years, as well as the top firm to work for in North America for three consecutive years.[7] PwC is a network of firms in 158 countries, 743 locations, with more than 236,000 people.[8] As of 201
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Insolvency
Insolvency is the state of being unable to pay the money owed, by a person or company, on time; those in a state of insolvency are said to be insolvent. There are two forms: cash-flow insolvency and balance-sheet insolvency. Cash-flow insolvency is when a person or company has enough assets to pay what is owed, but does not have the appropriate form of payment. For example, a person may own a large house and a valuable car, but not have enough liquid assets to pay a debt when it falls due. Cash-flow insolvency can usually be resolved by negotiation. For example, the bill collector may wait until the car is sold and the debtor agrees to pay a penalty. Balance-sheet insolvency is when a person or company does not have enough assets to pay all of their debts. The person or company might enter bankruptcy, but not necessarily
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Financial Adviser
A financial adviser is a professional who suggests and renders financial services to clients based on their financial situation. In many countries Financial Advisors have to complete specific training and hold a license to provide advices. In the United States
United States
for example a financial advisor carries a Series 65 or 66 license and according to the U.S. Financial Industry Regulatory Authority
Financial Industry Regulatory Authority
(FINRA), license designations and compliance issues must be reported for public view. [1] FINRA describes the main groups of investment professionals who may use the term financial adviser to be: brokers, investment advisers, accountants, lawyers, insurance agents and financial planners.[2]Contents1 Role 2 Compensation 3 Advisor vs
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Economies Of Scale
In microeconomics, economies of scale are the cost advantages that enterprises obtain due to their scale of operation (typically measured by amount of output produced), with cost per unit of output decreasing with increasing scale. Economies of scale
Economies of scale
apply to a variety of organizational and business situations and at various levels, such as a business or manufacturing unit, plant or an entire enterprise. When average costs start falling as output increases, then economies of scale are occurring
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CamelCase
Camel case
Camel case
(stylized as camelCase or CamelCase; also known as camel caps or more formally as medial capitals) is the practice of writing compound words or phrases such that each word or abbreviation in the middle of the phrase begins with a capital letter, with no intervening spaces or punctuation. Common examples include "iPhone", "eBay", "FedEx", "DreamWorks", and "HarperCollins". It is also sometimes used in online usernames such as "JohnSmith", and to make multi-word domain names more legible, for example in advertisements. Some systems prefer camelcase with the first letter capitalised, others not.[1][2][3] For clarity, this article calls the two alternatives upper camel case (initial upper case letter, also known as Pascal case) and lower camel case (initial lower case letter). Some people and organizations, notably Microsoft,[2] use the term camel case only for lower camel case
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Fortune 500
The Fortune 500
Fortune 500
is an annual list compiled and published by Fortune magazine that ranks 500 of the largest United States
United States
corporations by total revenue for their respective fiscal years.[2] The list includes publicly held companies, along with privately held companies for which revenues are publicly available. The concept of the Fortune 500
Fortune 500
was created by Edgar P. Smith, a Fortune editor, and the first list was published in 1955.[3][4] The Fortune 500
Fortune 500
is more commonly used than its subset Fortune 100 or wider list Fortune 1000.[5]Contents1 Methodology 2 History 3 Fortune 500
Fortune 500
lists 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksMethodology[edit] The original Fortune 500
Fortune 500
was limited to companies whose revenues were derived from manufacturing, mining, and energy exploration
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Trade Name
A trade name, trading name, or business name is a pseudonym frequently used by companies to operate under a name different from their registered, legal name. The term for this type of alternative name is a "fictitious" business name. Registering the fictitious name with the relevant government body is often required. In a number of countries, the phrase "trading as" (abbreviated to t/a) is used to designate a trade name. In the United States, the phrase "doing business as" (abbreviated to DBA, dba, d.b.a. or d/b/a) is used.[1] In Canada, "operating as" (abbreviated to o/a) and "trading as" (abbreviated to T/A) are used although "doing business as" is also sometimes used
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Enterprise Resource Planning
Enterprise resource planning
Enterprise resource planning
(ERP) is the integrated management of core business processes, often in real-time and mediated by software and technology. ERP is usually referred to as a category of business-management software — typically a suite of integrated applications—that an organization can use to collect, store, manage and interpret data from these many business activities. ERP provides an integrated and continuously updated view of core business processes using common databases maintained by a database management system. ERP systems track business resources—cash, raw materials, production capacity—and the status of business commitments: orders, purchase orders, and payroll
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Capgemini
Capgemini
Capgemini
SE is a French multinational professional services and business consulting corporation headquartered in Paris, France.[3] It provides IT services and is one of the world's largest IT consulting, outsourcing and professional services companies with over 200,000 employees in over 40 countries,[4][5][6], of whom nearly 100,000 are in India.[7] It was founded in 1967 by Serge Kampf in Grenoble, France. Paul Hermelin has been chairman and CEO of the Capgemini
Capgemini
group since his appointment in December 2001. Capgemini's regional operations include North and South America, Northern Europe & Asia Pacific and Central & Southern Europe. Services are delivered through four disciplines; Consulting, Technology, Outsourcing
Outsourcing
and Local Professional Services
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Enron
Enron Energy Services
Enron Energy Services
(EES) Enron
Enron
XceleratorWebsite www.enron.com Enron
Enron
Corporation was an American energy, commodities, and services company based in Houston, Texas. It was founded in 1985 as a merger between Houston Natural Gas and InterNorth, both relatively small regional companies
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Multinational Corporation
A multinational corporation (MNC) or worldwide enterprise[5] is a corporate organization that owns or controls production of goods or services in at least one country other than its home country.[6] A multinational corporation can also be referred to as a multinational enterprise (MNE), a transnational enterprise (TNE), a transnational corporation (TNC), an international corporation, or a stateless corporation.[7] There are subtle but real differences between these three labels, as well as multinational corporation and worldwide enterprise. Multinational corporations are subject to criticisms for lacking ethical standards, and that this shows up in how they evade ethical laws and leverage their own business agenda with capital, and even the military backing of their own wealthy host nation-states.Contents1 Overview 2 Theoretical background 3 Transnational corporations 4 Multinational enterprise 5
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Doing Business As
A trade name, trading name, or business name is a pseudonym frequently used by companies to operate under a name different from their registered, legal name. The term for this type of alternative name is a "fictitious" business name. Registering the fictitious name with the relevant government body is often required. In a number of countries, the phrase "trading as" (abbreviated to t/a) is used to designate a trade name. In the United States, the phrase "doing business as" (abbreviated to DBA, dba, d.b.a. or d/b/a) is used.[1] In Canada, "operating as" (abbreviated to o/a) and "trading as" (abbreviated to T/A) are used although "doing business as" is also sometimes used
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United States Dollar
 United States  East Timor[2][Note 1]  Ecuador[3][Note 2]  El Salvador[4]  Federated States of Micronesia  Marshall Islands  Palau  Panama[Note 3]  Zimbabwe[Note 4]3 non-U.S
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Legal
Law
Law
is a system of rules that are created and enforced through social or governmental institutions to regulate behavior.[2] Law
Law
is a system that regulates and ensures that individuals or a community adhere to the will of the state. State-enforced laws can be made by a collective legislature or by a single legislator, resulting in statutes, by the executive through decrees and regulations, or established by judges through precedent, normally in common law jurisdictions. Private individuals can create legally binding contracts, including arbitration agreements that may elect to accept alternative arbitration to the normal court process. The formation of laws themselves may be influenced by a constitution, written or tacit, and the rights encoded therein
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Actuarial
Actuarial science
Actuarial science
is the discipline that applies mathematical and statistical methods to assess risk in insurance, finance and other industries and professions. Actuaries are professionals who are qualified in this field through intense education and experience. In many countries, actuaries must demonstrate their competence by passing a series of rigorous professional examinations. Actuarial science
Actuarial science
includes a number of interrelated subjects, including mathematics, probability theory, statistics, finance, economics, and computer science. Historically, actuarial science used deterministic models in the construction of tables and premiums
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WorldCom
MCI, Inc. (d/b/a Verizon Business) was an American telecommunication corporation, currently a subsidiary of Verizon Communications, with its main office in Ashburn, Virginia. The corporation was formed originally as a result of the merger of WorldCom
WorldCom
and MCI Communications corporations, and used the name MCI WorldCom, succeeded by WorldCom, before changing its name to the present version on April 12, 2003, as part of the corporation's ending of its bankruptcy status. The company traded on NASDAQ
NASDAQ
as WCOM (pre-bankruptcy) and MCIP (post-bankruptcy)
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