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Praguerie
The Praguerie was a revolt of the French nobility against King Charles VII in 1440. It was so named because a similar rising had recently taken place in Prague, Bohemia, at that time closely associated with France
France
through the House of Luxembourg, kings of Bohemia. Its causes lay in the reforms of Charles VII at the close of the Hundred Years' War, by which he sought to diminish the anarchy in France
France
and its brigand-soldiery
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France
France
France
(French: [fʁɑ̃s]), officially the French Republic (French: République française [ʁepyblik fʁɑ̃sɛz]), is a country whose territory consists of metropolitan France
France
in western Europe, as well as several overseas regions and territories.[XIII] The metropolitan area of France
France
extends from the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
to the English Channel
English Channel
and the North Sea, and from the Rhine
Rhine
to the Atlantic Ocean. The overseas territories include French Guiana
French Guiana
in South America and several islands in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans
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Georges De La Tremoille
Georges de la Trémoille (c.1382 –6 May 1446) was Count de Guînes from 1398 to 1446 and Grand Chamberlain of France to King Charles VII of France. He sought reconciliation between Philip, Duke of Burgundy and Charles VII during their estrangement in the latter part of the Hundred Years' War. De la Trémoille was a political opponent of Arthur de Richemont within the French court. Most historians take a poor view of his career, assessing that he placed personal advancement before the public interest, albeit the traditional historical interpretation of the Grand Chamberlain as Jeanne d'Arc's opponent has been revised.[1][2][3] La Trémoille was captured at Agincourt in 1415. He regained his freedom shortly afterward and dedicated the rest of his career to court life and diplomacy. He made an advantageous marriage to Joan II of Auvergne (1378 –1424), Countess of Auvergne and Boulogne (1404 –1424)
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Feudal
Feudalism
Feudalism
was a combination of legal and military customs in medieval Europe that flourished between the 9th and 15th centuries
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Poitou
Poitou
Poitou
(French pronunciation: ​[pwatu]), in Poitevin: Poetou, was a province of west-central France whose capital city was Poitiers.Contents1 Geography 2 History 3 Culture 4 In fiction 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksGeography[edit] The main historical cities are Poitiers
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Arthur III, Duke Of Brittany
Arthur III (in Breton Arzhur III) (24 August 1393 – 26 December 1458), known as the Justicier and as Arthur de Richemont, was Lord of Parthenay
Parthenay
and titular Count (Earl) of Richmond in England and for eleven months at the very end of his life, Duke of Brittany
Duke of Brittany
and Count of Montfort after inheriting those titles upon the death of his nephew.Contents1 Life1.1 Family2 Succession 3 Ancestry 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksLife[edit] Arthur was a younger son of Duke John IV and his third wife Joanna of Navarre, and so a member of the Ducal House of Montfort. Arthur was born at the Château de Suscinio. Just a year before his own death, Arthur succeeded his nephew Peter II as Duke
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Dauphiné
The Dauphiné (/ˌdoʊfiːˈneɪ/ or /ˈdoʊfɪneɪ/; French pronunciation: [do.fi.ne]) or Dauphiné Viennois, formerly Dauphiny in English, is a former province in southeastern France, whose area roughly corresponded to that of the present departments of Isère, Drôme, and Hautes-Alpes. The Dauphiné was originally the County of Albon. In the 12th century, the local ruler Count Guigues IV of Albon (c.1095–1142) bore a dolphin on his coat of arms and was nicknamed "le Dauphin" (French for dolphin). His descendants changed their title from Count of Albon to Dauphin of Viennois. The state took the name of Dauphiné. It became a state of the Holy Roman Empire in the 11th century. The Dauphiné is best known for its transfer from the last non-royal Dauphin (who had great debts and no direct heir) to the King of France in 1349
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Dauphin Of France
The Dauphin of France
Dauphin of France
( /ˈdɔːfɪn/, also UK: /ˈdoʊfæn/ and US: /doʊˈfæn/; French: Dauphin de France, IPA: [dofɛ̃])—strictly The Dauphin of Viennois (Dauphin de Viennois)—was the dynastic title given to the heir apparent to the throne of France from 1350 to 1791 and 1824 to 1830.[1] The word is French for dolphin, as a reference to the depiction of the animal on their coat of arms.Contents1 History 2 Gallery of Arms 3 List of Dauphins 4 In literature 5 See also 6 ReferencesHistory[edit]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (August 2017) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)Guigues IV, Count of Vienne, had a dolphin on his coat of arms and was nicknamed le Dauphin
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Duke Of Bourbon
Duke of Bourbon
Duke of Bourbon
(French: Duc de Bourbon) is a title in the peerage of France. It was created in the first half of the 14th century for the eldest son of Robert of France, Count of Clermont and Beatrice of Burgundy, heiress of the lordship of Bourbon. In 1416, with the death of John of Valois, the Dukes of Bourbon
Dukes of Bourbon
were simultaneously Dukes of Auvergne. Although the senior line came to an end in 1527, the cadet branch of La Marche-Vendome would later succeed to the French throne as the Royal House of Bourbon, which would later spread out to other kingdoms and duchies in Europe
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Public Domain
The legal term public domain refers to works whose exclusive intellectual property rights have expired,[1] have been forfeited,[2] have been expressly waived, or are inapplicable.[3] For example, the works of Shakespeare
Shakespeare
and Beethoven, and most early silent films are in the public domain either by virtue of their having been created before copyright existed, or by their copyright term having expired.[1] Some works are not covered by copyright, and are therefore in the public domain—among them the formulae of Newtonian physics, cooking recipes,[4] and all computer software created prior to 1974.[5] Other works are actively dedicated
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Mercenaries
A mercenary[1] is a person who takes part in an armed conflict who is completely funded by the government and is "motivated to take part in the hostilities by desire for private gain".[2][3] Mercenaries fight for money or other recompense rather than for political interests. In the last century, and as reflected in the Geneva Convention, mercenaries have increasingly come to be seen as less entitled to protections by rules of war than non-mercenaries
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Louis, Count Of Vendôme
Louis de Bourbon (Louis I, Count of Vendôme) (1376 – December 21, 1446, Tours), younger son of John I, Count of La Marche
John I, Count of La Marche
and Catherine de Vendôme, was Count of Vendôme
Count of Vendôme
from 1393, and Count of Castres from 1425 until his death.[1] He was a supporter of the duc d'Orléans, and obtained valuable posts at court, becoming Grand Chamberlain of France in 1408 and Grand Maître de France in 1413. As part of the Armagnac faction, he was at odds with the Burgundians, and was imprisoned by them twice, in 1407 and 1412. In 1414, he married Blanche (d. 1421), daughter of Hugh II, Count of Roucy; but he was captured the next year by the English at the Battle of Agincourt, and held by them for some time.[2] Freed, he was later captured at the Battle of Cravant
Battle of Cravant
, 31 July 1423.[3] Error. He was not at the Battle of Cravant
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Nobility
Nobility
Nobility
is a social class in aristocracy, normally ranked immediately under royalty, that possesses more acknowledged privileges and higher social status than most other classes in a society and with membership thereof typically being hereditary. The privileges associated with nobility may constitute substantial advantages over or relative to non-nobles, or may be largely honorary (e.g., precedence), and vary by country and era
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Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition
The Encyclopædia Britannica
Encyclopædia Britannica
Eleventh Edition (1910–11) is a 29-volume reference work, an edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. It was developed during the encyclopaedia's transition from a British to an American publication. Some of its articles were written by the best-known scholars of the time. This edition of the encyclopedia, containing 40,000 entries, is now in the public domain; and many of its articles have been used as a basis for articles in.[1] However, the outdated nature of some of its content makes its use as a source for modern scholarship problematic
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Favourite
A favourite or favorite (American English) was the intimate companion of a ruler or other important person. In medieval and Early Modern Europe, among other times and places, the term is used of individuals delegated significant political power by a ruler. It was especially a phenomenon of the 16th and 17th centuries, when government had become too complex for many hereditary rulers with no great interest in or talent for it, and political institutions were still evolving. From 1600 to 1660 there were particular successions of all-powerful minister-favourites in much of Europe, especially in Spain, England, France and Sweden.[1] The term is also sometimes employed by writers who want to avoid terms such as "royal mistress", or "friend", "companion" or "lover" of either sex
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Saintonge
Saintonge
Saintonge
(French pronunciation: ​[sɛ̃tɔ̃ʒ]), historically spelled Xaintonge and Xainctonge, is a former province of France located on the west central Atlantic coast. The capital city was Saintes (Xaintes, Xainctes). Other principal towns include Saint-Jean-d'Angély, Jonzac, Frontenay-Rohan-Rohan, Royan, Marennes, Pons, and Barbezieux-Saint-Hilaire. The borders of the province slightly shifted through history, and some mapmakers, such as Nicolas Sanson (1650), Johannes Blaeu
Johannes Blaeu
(1662), and Bernard Antoine Jaillot (1733), show it extending into Cognac, traditionally part of Angoumois, and to the parishes of Braud-et-Saint-Louis
Braud-et-Saint-Louis
and Étauliers, part of the Pays Gabay on the right bank of the Gironde River. Today, four fifths of the historical Saintonge
Saintonge
province occupies the modern département of Charente-Maritime
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