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Portage
Portage
Portage
or portaging is the practice of carrying water craft or cargo over land, either around an obstacle in a river, or between two bodies of water. A place where this carrying occurs is also called a portage. Early French explorers in New France
New France
and French Louisiana encountered many rapids and cascades. The Native Americans carried their canoes over land to avoid river obstacles. Over time, important portages were sometimes provided with canals with locks, and even portage railways. Primitive portaging generally involves carrying the vessel and its contents across the portage in multiple trips. Small canoes can be portaged by carrying them inverted over one's shoulders and the center strut may be designed in the style of a yoke to facilitate this
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Viking
Vikings
Vikings
(Old English: wicing—"pirate",[1] Danish and Bokmål: vikinger; Swedish and Nynorsk: vikingar; Icelandic: víkingar, from Old Norse) were Norse seafarers, mainly speaking the Old Norse language, who raided and traded from their Northern European homelands across wide areas of northern, central, eastern and western Europe, during the late 8th to late 11th centuries.[2][3] The term is also commonly extended in modern English and other vernaculars to the inhabitants of Viking home communities during what has become known as the Viking Age
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Ancient Greece
Ancient Greece
Greece
was a civilization belonging to a period of Greek history from the Greek Dark Ages
Greek Dark Ages
of the 13th–9th centuries BC to the end of antiquity (c. 600 AD). Immediately following this period was the beginning of the Early Middle Ages
Middle Ages
and the Byzantine
Byzantine
era.[1] Roughly three centuries after the Late Bronze Age collapse
Late Bronze Age collapse
of Mycenaean Greece, Greek urban poleis began to form in the 8th century BC, ushering in the period of Archaic Greece
Archaic Greece
and colonization of the Mediterranean Basin. This was followed by the period of Classical Greece, an era that began with the Greco-Persian Wars, lasting from the 5th to 4th centuries BC
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Adige
The Adige
Adige
(Italian pronunciation: [ˈaːdidʒe]; German: Etsch [ɛtʃ]; Venetian: Àdexe; Romansh:  Adisch (help·info); Ladin: Adesc; Latin: Athesis; Ancient Greek: Ἄθεσις) is the second longest river in Italy
Italy
after the Po, rising in the Alps
Alps
in the province of South Tyrol
South Tyrol
near the Italian border with Austria
Austria
and Switzerland, flowing 410 kilometres (250 mi) through most of North-East Italy
Italy
to the Adriatic Sea.Contents1 Description 2 Ecology2.1 Fauna3 Gallery 4 References 5 External linksDescription[edit] The river sources near the Reschen Pass
Reschen Pass
(1,504 metres (4,934 ft)) close to the borders with Austria
Austria
and Switzerland
Switzerland
above the Inn valley
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Three Gorges
The Three Gorges
Three Gorges
(Chinese: 三峡; pinyin:  Sānxiá) are three adjacent gorges along the middle reaches of the Yangtze
Yangtze
River in the People's Republic of China. They're known for their scenery, and the " Three Gorges
Three Gorges
Scenic Area" is classified as the AAAAA scenic area (the highest level) by the China National Tourism Administration.[1] The Three Gorges
Three Gorges
are located in the mainstream of the Yangtze
Yangtze
River. They start from the Baidi City of Chongqing
Chongqing
Municipality in the west of the People's Republic of China
People's Republic of China
and ends at Nanjing Pass of Yichang City of Hubei
Hubei
Province in the east, stretching over 193 miles
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Yangtze River
The Yangtze
Yangtze
(English: /ˈjæŋtsi/ or /ˈjɑːŋtsi/), which is 6,380 km (3,964 miles) long, is the longest river in Asia and the third-longest in the world. The river is the longest in the world to flow entirely within one country. It drains one-fifth of the land area of the People's Republic of China
China
(PRC) and its river basin is home to nearly one-third of the country's population.[7] The Yangtze
Yangtze
is the sixth-largest river by discharge volume in the world. The English name Yangtze
Yangtze
derives from the Chinese name Yángzǐ Jiāng ( listen), which refers to the lowest 435 km of the river between Nanjing
Nanjing
and Shanghai
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Mediterranean Sea
The Mediterranean Sea
Sea
is a sea connected to the Atlantic Ocean, surrounded by the Mediterranean Basin
Mediterranean Basin
and almost completely enclosed by land: on the north by Southern Europe
Southern Europe
and Anatolia, on the south by North Africa
North Africa
and on the east by the Levant. Although the sea is sometimes considered a part of the Atlantic Ocean, it is usually identified as a separate body of water
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Nile
The Nile
Nile
(Arabic: النيل‎, Egyptian Arabic en-Nīl, Standard Arabic an-Nīl; Coptic: ⲫⲓⲁⲣⲱ, P(h)iaro; Ancient Egyptian: Ḥ'pī and Jtrw; Biblical Hebrew: הַיְאוֹר‬, Ha-Ye'or or הַשִׁיחוֹר‬, Ha-Shiḥor) is a major north-flowing river in northeastern Africa, and is commonly regarded as the longest river in the world,[1] though some sources cite the Amazon River
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Strangulated Hernia
A hernia is the abnormal exit of tissue or an organ, such as the bowel, through the wall of the cavity in which it normally resides.[1] Hernias come in a number of different types.[6] Most commonly they involve the abdomen, specifically the groin.[6] Groin hernias are most common of the inguinal type but may also be femoral.[1] Other hernias include hiatus, incisional, and umbilical hernias.[6] Symptoms are present in about 66% of people with groin hernias.[1] This may include pain or discomfort especially with coughing, exercise, or going to the bathroom.[1] Often it gets worse throughout the day and improves when lying down.[1] A bulging area may occur that becomes larger when bearing down.[1] Groin hernias occur more often on the right than left side.[1] The main concern is strangulation, where the blood supply to part of the bowel is blocked.[1] This usually produces severe pain and tenderness of the area.[1] Hiatus or hiatal hernias often result in heartburn but may also cause che
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Gulf Of Corinth
The Gulf of Corinth or the Corinthian Gulf (Greek: Κορινθιακός Kόλπος, Korinthiakόs Kόlpos) is a deep inlet of the Ionian Sea separating the Peloponnese from western mainland Greece. It is bounded in the east by the Isthmus of Corinth which includes the shipping-designed Corinth Canal and in the west by the Strait of Rion which widens into the shorter Gulf of Patras (part of the Ionian Sea) and of which the narrowest point is crossed since 2004 by the Rio-Antirio Bridge. The gulf is bordered by the large administrative divisions (prefectures): Aetolia-Acarnania and Phocis in the north, Boeotia in the northeast, Attica in the east, Corinthia in the southeast and south and Achaea in the southwest
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Ptolemy
Claudius
Claudius
Ptolemy
Ptolemy
(/ˈtɒləmi/; Greek: Κλαύδιος Πτολεμαῖος, Klaúdios Ptolemaîos [kláwdios ptolɛmɛ́ːos]; Latin: Claudius
Claudius
Ptolemaeus; c. AD 100 – c. 170)[2] was a Greco-Roman[3] mathematician, astronomer, geographer, astrologer, and poet of a single epigram in the Greek Anthology.[4][5] He lived in the city of Alexandria
Alexandria
in the Roman province of Egypt, wrote in Koine Greek, and held Roman citizenship.[6] The 14th-century astronomer Theodore Meliteniotes gave his birthplace as the prominent Greek city Ptolemais Hermiou
Ptolemais Hermiou
(Greek: Πτολεμαΐς ‘Ερμείου) in the Thebaid
Thebaid
(Greek: Θηβαΐδα [Θηβαΐς])
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Saronic Gulf
The Saronic Gulf
Saronic Gulf
(Greek: Σαρωνικός κόλπος, Saronikós kólpos) or Gulf of Aegina
Aegina
in Greece
Greece
is formed between the peninsulas of Attica
Attica
and Argolis
Argolis
and forms part of the Aegean Sea. It defines the eastern side of the isthmus of Corinth, being the eastern terminus of the Corinth Canal, which cuts across the isthmus.Contents1 Geography 2 Tributaries 3 Capes 4 Sailing in the Saronic Gulf 5 Other 6 See also 7 ReferencesGeography[edit] The gulf includes the islands of Aegina, Salamis, and Poros
Poros
along with smaller islands of Patroklos and Fleves. The port of Piraeus, Athens' port, lies on the northeastern edge of the gulf
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Despotism
Despotism
Despotism
(Greek: Δεσποτισμός, Despotismós) is a form of government in which a single entity rules with absolute power. Normally, that entity is an individual, the despot, as in an autocracy, but societies which limit respect and power to specific groups have also been called despotic.[1] Colloquially, the word despot applies pejoratively to those who abuse their power and authority to oppress their populace, subjects, or subordinates. More specifically, the term often applies to a head of state or government
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Railway
Rail transport
Rail transport
is a means of transferring of passengers and goods on wheeled vehicles running on rails, also known as tracks. It is also commonly referred to as train transport. In contrast to road transport, where vehicles run on a prepared flat surface, rail vehicles (rolling stock) are directionally guided by the tracks on which they run. Tracks usually consist of steel rails, installed on ties (sleepers) and ballast, on which the rolling stock, usually fitted with metal wheels, moves
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Ancient History
Ancient history
Ancient history
is the aggregate of past events[1] from the beginning of recorded human history and extending as far as the Early Middle Ages or the Post-classical Era. The span of recorded history is roughly 5,000 years, beginning with Sumerian Cuneiform
Cuneiform
script, the oldest discovered form of coherent writing from the protoliterate period around the 30th century BC.[2] The term classical antiquity is often used to refer to history in the Old World
Old World
from the beginning of recorded Greek history
Greek history
in 776 BC (First Olympiad). This roughly coincides with the traditional date of the founding of Rome in 753 BC, the beginning of the history of ancient Rome, and the beginning of the Archaic period in Ancient Greece
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Roman Egypt
The Roman province
Roman province
of Egypt
Egypt
(Latin: Aegyptus, pronounced [ae̯ˈɡʏptʊs]; Greek: Αἴγυπτος Aigyptos [ɛ́ːɡyptos]) was established in 30 BC after Octavian (the future emperor Augustus) defeated his rival Mark Antony, deposed Queen Cleopatra VII, and annexed the Ptolemaic Kingdom
Ptolemaic Kingdom
of Egypt
Egypt
to the Roman Empire. The province encompassed most of modern-day Egypt
Egypt
except for the Sinai Peninsula
Sinai Peninsula
(which would later be conquered by Trajan). Aegyptus was bordered by the provinces of Creta et Cyrenaica to the West and Iudaea (later Arabia Petraea) to the East. The province came to serve as a major producer of grain for the empire and had a highly developed urban economy
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