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Pilasters
The pilaster is an architectural element in classical architecture used to give the appearance of a supporting column and to articulate an extent of wall, with only an ornamental function. It consists of a flat surface raised from the main wall surface, usually treated as though it were a column, with a capital at the top, plinth (base) at the bottom, and the various other elements. In contrast to a pilaster, an engaged column or buttress can support the structure of a wall and roof above.Contents1 Definition 2 Gallery 3 See also 4 Notes 5 ReferencesDefinition[edit] In discussing Leon Battista Alberti's use of pilasters, which Alberti reintroduced into wall-architecture, Rudolf Wittkower
Rudolf Wittkower
wrote, "The pilaster is the logical transformation of the column for the decoration of a wall
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Pilaster (horse)
Pilasater (foaled 1944 in Maryland) was an American Thoroughbred racehorse who was inducted into the Maryland-Bred Hall of Fame in 1967.[1] He was bred and raced by Henry L. Straus and trained by Frank Bonsal. Breeding[edit] Pilaster was sired by Pilate, a son of the 1916 American Horse of the Year and Belmont Stakes winner Friar Rock. His dam was Air Cooled, whose sire (Jacopo) was the 1930 Champion Two-Year-Old Colt in England.[2] Racing career[edit] Pilaster enjoyed considerable racing success from age four through eight
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Paris
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Paris
Paris
(French pronunciation: ​[paʁi] ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city in France, with an administrative-limits area of 105 square kilometres (41 square miles) and an official population of 2,206,488 (2015).[5] The city is a commune and department, and the heart of the 12,012-square-kilometre (4,638-square-mile) Île-de-
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Corinthian Order
The Corinthian order
Corinthian order
is the last developed of the three principal classical orders of ancient Greek and Roman architecture. The other two are the Doric order
Doric order
which was the earliest, followed by the Ionic order. When classical architecture was revived during the Renaissance, two more orders were added to the canon, the Tuscan order
Tuscan order
and the Composite order. The Corinthian, with its offshoot the Composite, is the most ornate of the orders. This architectural style is characterized by slender fluted columns and elaborate capitals decorated with acanthus leaves and scrolls. There are many variations. The name Corinthian is derived from the ancient Greek city of Corinth, although the style had its own model in Roman practice, following precedents set by the Temple of Mars Ultor
Temple of Mars Ultor
in the Forum of Augustus (c
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Springfield, Ohio
Springfield is a city in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Ohio
Ohio
and the county seat of Clark County.[6] The municipality is located in southwestern Ohio
Ohio
and is situated on the Mad River, Buck Creek and Beaver Creek, approximately 45 miles (72 km) west of Columbus and 25 miles (40 km) northeast of Dayton
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Frankfurt (Oder)
Frankfurt
Frankfurt
(Oder) (German pronunciation: [ˈfʁaŋkfʊɐ̯t], also Frankfurt
Frankfurt
an der Oder, abbreviated Frankfurt
Frankfurt
a. d. Oder, Frankfurt
Frankfurt
a. d. O., Frankf. a. d. O., Polish: Frankfurt
Frankfurt
nad Odrą, Słubice[2][3]; lit. ' Frankfurt
Frankfurt
on the Oder') is a town in Brandenburg, Germany, located on the Oder
Oder
River, on the German-Polish border directly opposite the town of Słubice, which was part of Frankfurt
Frankfurt
until 1945. At the end of the 1980s, it reached a population peak with more than 87,000 inhabitants. The number dropped below 70,000 in 2002 and was just above 60,000 in 2010.[4] The city's recorded history began in the 13th century as a Polish settlement
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Germany
Coordinates: 51°N 9°E / 51°N 9°E / 51; 9Federal Republic
Republic
of Germany Bundesrepublik Deutschland (German)[a]FlagCoat of armsMotto:  "Einigkeit und Recht und Freiheit" (de facto) "Unity and Justice and Freedom"Anthem: "Deutschlandlied" (third verse only)[b] "Song of Germany"Location of  Germany  (dark green) – in Europe  (green & dark grey) – in the European Union  (green)Location of
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Lerma, Burgos
Lerma is a village in the province of Burgos, part of the autonomous community of Castile and León, Spain. It has important monuments dating from the 17th century, which were built by the Duke of Lerma.[1] Gallery[edit]Collegiate church of San Pedro.Ducal palace of Lerma.Monastery of la Ascensión de Nuestro Señor, also known as the Convento de Santa Clara.References[edit]^ "Lerma". spain.info. Turespaña
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Spain
Coordinates: 40°N 4°W / 40°N 4°W / 40; -4Kingdom of Spain Reino de España  (Spanish)6 other official names[a][b]Aragonese: Reino d'EspanyaAsturian: Reinu d'EspañaBasque: Espainiako ErresumaCatalan: Regne d'EspanyaGalician: Reino de EspañaOccitan: Reiaume d'EspanhaFlagCoat of armsMotto: "Plus Ultra" (Latin) "Further Beyond"Anthem: "Marcha Real" (Spanish)[2] "Royal March"Location of  Spain  (dark green) – in Europe  (green & dark grey) – in the European Union  (green)Capital and largest city Madrid 40°26′N 3°42′W / 40.433°N 3.700°W / 40.433; -3.700Official language and national language Spanish[c]Co-official languages in certain autonomous communities Catalan Galician Basque OccitanEthnic groups (2015)89.9% Spanish 10.1% othersReligi
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Colossal Order
In Classical architecture, a giant order, also known as colossal order, is an order whose columns or pilasters span two (or more) storeys. At the same time, smaller orders may feature in arcades or window and door framings within the storeys that are embraced by the giant order.[1] The giant order as such was unknown to antiquity, although most ancient buildings using formal orders lacked upper storeys
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Avenue De L'Opéra
The Avenue de l'Opéra
Avenue de l'Opéra
was created from 1864 to 1879 as part of Haussmann's renovation of Paris. It is situated in the center of the city, running northwest from the Louvre
Louvre
to the Palais Garnier, the primary opera house of Paris (until the opening of the Opéra Bastille in 1989).Contents1 Description 2 History 3 Metro stations 4 Trivia 5 Gallery 6 On old maps of Paris 7 References 8 External linksDescription[edit] The Avenue de l'Opéra
Avenue de l'Opéra
was an important thoroughfare in Haussmann's traffic scheme, since it linked the rue de Rivoli at the Louvre
Louvre
to the grands boulevards near the Opéra and gave better access to the wealthy neighbourhoods being developed at that time in northwest Paris
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Princes Risborough Manor House
Princes Risborough
Princes Risborough
is an affluent small town in Buckinghamshire, England, about 9 miles south of Aylesbury
Aylesbury
and 8 miles north west of High Wycombe. Bledlow
Bledlow
lies to the west and Monks Risborough
Monks Risborough
to the east. It lies at the foot of the Chiltern Hills, at the north end of a gap or pass through the Chilterns, the south end of which is at West Wycombe
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Greek Revival Architecture
The Greek Revival was an architectural movement of the late 18th and early 19th centuries, predominantly in Northern Europe and the United States. A product of Hellenism, it may be looked upon as the last phase in the development of Neoclassical architecture. The term was first used by Charles Robert Cockerell
Charles Robert Cockerell
in a lecture he gave as Professor of Architecture to the Royal Academy of Arts, London in 1842.[1] With a newfound access to Greece, or initially the books produced by the few who had actually been able to visit the sites, archaeologist-architects of the period studied the Doric and Ionic orders. In each country it touched, the style was looked on as the expression of local nationalism and civic virtue, and freedom from the lax detail and frivolity that was thought to characterize the architecture of France and Italy, two countries where the style never really took hold
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Ionic Order
The Ionic order
Ionic order
forms one of the three classical orders of classical architecture, the other two canonic orders being the Doric and the Corinthian. There are two lesser orders: the Tuscan (a plainer Doric), and the rich variant of Corinthian called the composite order, both added by 16th-century Italian architectural writers, based on Roman practice. Of the three canonic orders, the Ionic order
Ionic order
has the narrowest columns. The Ionic capital is characterized by the use of volutes
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Lesene
A lesene – also called a pilaster strip[1] – is an architectural term for a narrow, low-relief, vertical pillar in a wall. It resembles a pilaster, but does not have a base or capital.[2] It is typical in Lombardic and Rijnlandish architectural building styles.[3] Function[edit] Lesenes are used in architecture to vertically divide a facade or other wall surface optically, albeit—unlike pilasters—without a base or capital. Their function is ornamental, not just to decorate the plain surface of a wall but, in the case of corner lesenes, to emphasise the edges of a building. Gallery[edit]Lesenes and corbel table on a chapel wallLesenes and corbel table at the Mausoleum of Galla Placidia
Mausoleum of Galla Placidia
in Ravenna (ca
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List Of Classical Architecture Terms
The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to classical architecture: Classical architecture
Classical architecture
– architecture of classical antiquity, that is, ancient Greek architecture and the architecture of ancient Rome. It also refers to the style or styles of architecture influenced by those. For example, most of the styles originating in post-renaissance Europe can be described as classical architecture
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