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Parmigiana
Parmigiana
Parmigiana
(US: /ˌpɑːrməˈʒɑːnə/, UK: /ˌpɑːmɪˈdʒɑːnə/; Italian: [parmiˈdʒaːna]; also parmigiana di melanzane [parmiˈdʒaːna di melanˈdzaːne; -ˈtsa-], or melanzane alla parmigiana [melanˈdzaːne alla parmiˈdʒaːna; -ˈtsa-] or shortened as Parma, in Australian English[1] called eggplant parmesan) is an Italian dish made with a shallow or deep-fried sliced eggplant (also called aubergine) filling, layered with cheese and tomato sauce, then baked. Parmigiana
Parmigiana
made with a filling of eggplant is the earliest and still unique Italian version.[citation needed] The origin of the dish is claimed by both the Southern regions of Campania
Campania
and Sicily
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Neapolitan Ragù
Neapolitan ragù
Neapolitan ragù
(known in Italian as ragù alla napoletana pronounced [raˈɡu alla napoleˈtaːna] or ragù napoletano) is one of the two most famous varieties of meat sauces called ragù. It is a speciality of Naples, as its name indicates. (The other variety originated in Bologna
Bologna
and is known in Italian as ragù bolognese or ragù alla bolognese.) The Neapolitan type is made from three main parts: a soffritto, meat, and tomato sauce. However, a major difference is how the meat is used, as well as the amount of tomato in the sauce. Bolognese versions use very finely chopped meat, while Neapolitan versions use whole meat, taking it from the casserole when cooked and serving it as a second course or with pasta. Also, the Neapolitan soffritto contains much more onion compared to the Bolognese. Preferences for ingredients also differ
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Ancient Roman Cuisine
Ancient Roman cuisine
Ancient Roman cuisine
changed over the long duration of the ancient Roman civilization. Dietary habits were affected by the influence of Greek culture, the political changes from kingdom to republic to empire, and the empire's enormous expansion, which exposed Romans to many new provincial culinary habits and cooking methods. In the beginning, dietary differences between Roman social classes were not very great, but disparities developed with the empire's growth.Contents1 Meals 2 Foods and ingredients 3 Cooking 4 Alcoholic drinks 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksMeals[edit] Further information: Food and dining in the Roman Empire Traditionally, a breakfast called ientaculum[1] was served at dawn
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Clarín (Argentine Newspaper)
Clarín (Spanish pronunciation: [klaˈɾin], meaning "Bugle") is the largest newspaper in Argentina, published by the Grupo Clarín media group. It was founded by Roberto Noble
Roberto Noble
on 28 August 1945 in Buenos Aires. It was popularly understood to oppose the Kirchner government.[2] Its director since 1969 was Ernestina Herrera de Noble.[3] Clarín is part of Periódicos Asociados Latinoamericanos (Latin American Newspaper
Newspaper
Association), an organization of fourteen leading newspapers in South America.Contents1 History 2 Circulation 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Clarín was created by Roberto Noble, former minister of the Buenos Aires Province, on 28 August 1945. It was one of the first Argentine newspapers published in tabloid format. It became the highest sold Argentine newspaper in 1965, and the highest sold Spanish-speaking newspaper in 1985
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The Age
The Age
The Age
is a daily newspaper that has been published in Melbourne, Australia, since 1854. Owned and published by Fairfax Media, The Age primarily serves Victoria but is also available for purchase in Tasmania, the Australian Capital Territory
Australian Capital Territory
and border regions of South Australia
Australia
and southern New South Wales. It is delivered in both hardcopy and online formats
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Milanesa
The milanesa (in Italian "cotoletta alla milanese") is a South American variation of an Italian dish where generic types of breaded meat fillet preparations are known as a milanesa.[1] The milanesa was brought to the Southern Cone
Southern Cone
by Italian immigrants during the mass emigration called the Italian diaspora
Italian diaspora
between 1860-1920s. Its name probably reflects an original Milanese preparation, cotoletta alla Milanese, which is similar to the Austrian Wiener Schnitzel.[2] A milanesa consists of a thin slice of beef, chicken, veal, or sometimes pork, eggplants, tempeh or soy. Each slice is dipped into beaten eggs, seasoned with salt, and other condiments according to the cook's taste (like parsley and garlic). Each slice is then dipped in bread crumbs (or occasionally flour) and shallow-fried in oil, one at a time. Some people prefer to use very little oil and then bake them in the oven as a healthier alternative
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French Fries
French fries
French fries
(North American English), chips (British and Commonwealth English),[1] finger chips (Indian English),[2] or French-fried potatoes are batonnet or allumette-cut deep-fried potatoes. In the United States
United States
and most of Canada, the term fries refers to all dishes of fried elongated pieces of potatoes, while in the United Kingdom, Australia, South Africa
South Africa
(rarely), Ireland
Ireland
and New Zealand, thinly cut fried potatoes are sometimes called shoestring fries or skinny fries to distinguish them from chips, which are cut thicker. French fries
French fries
are served hot, either soft or crispy, and are generally eaten as part of lunch or dinner or by themselves as a snack, and they commonly appear on the menus of diners, fast food restaurants, pubs, and bars
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Sunday Mail (Adelaide)
The Sunday Mail (originally titled the Mail) is an Adelaide
Adelaide
newspaper first published on 4 May 1912 by Clarence Moody.[1] Through much of the 20th century, The Advertiser was Adelaide's morning broadsheet, The News the afternoon tabloid, with The Sunday Mail covering weekend sport, and Messenger Newspapers
Messenger Newspapers
covering community news.Contents1 History1.1 The Mail 1.2 The Sunday Mail2 Content 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] The Mail[edit] In 1912, Clarence Moody initially set up three newspapers – the Sporting Mail (1912-1914), Saturday Mail (1912-1917), and the Mail. The first two titles lasted only a few years, and the Mail itself went into liquidation in late 1914. Ownership passed briefly to George Annells and Frank Stone, and then to Herbert Syme
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Argentina
Coordinates: 34°S 64°W / 34°S 64°W / -34; -64Argentine Republic[A] República Argentina  (Spanish)FlagCoat of armsMotto: "En unión y libertad" ("In Unity and Freedom")Anthem: Himno Nacional Argentino ("Argentine National Anthem")Sol de Mayo[2] (Sun of May)Location of  Argentina  (dark green) in South America  (grey)Capital and largest city Buenos Aires 34°36′S 58°23′W / 34.600°S 58.383°W / -34.600; -58.383Official languages NoneNational language Spanish[a]Regional languagesGuarani in Corrientes;[3] Qom, Mocoví and Wichí in Chaco[4]Religion77.1% Roman Catholicism 10.8% Protestant 10.1% Non-religious 2.6% Other[5]DemonymArgentine Argentinian Argentinean (uncommon)Government Federal presidential constitutional republic• PresidentMauricio Macri•
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Italy
Coordinates: 43°N 12°E / 43°N 12°E / 43; 12Italian Republic Repubblica Italiana  (Italian)FlagEmblemAnthem: Il Canto degli Italiani  (Italian) "The Song of the Italians"Location of  Italy  (dark green) – in Europe  (light green & dark grey) – in the European Union  (light green)  –  [Legend]Capital and largest city Rome 41°54′N 12°29′E / 41.900°N 12.483°E / 41.900; 12.483Official languages ItalianaNative languages see full listReligion83.3% Christians 12.4% irreligious 3.7% Muslims 0.2% Buddhists 0.1% Hindus 0.3% other religions[1]Demonym ItalianGovernment Unitary constitutional parliamentary republic• PresidentSergio Mattarella• Prime MinisterPaolo Gentiloni• President of the SenateElisabetta Casellati•&
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Bell Peppers
The bell pepper (also known as sweet pepper, pepper or capsicum) /ˈkæpsɪkəm/[1] is a cultivar group of the species Capsicum annuum.[2] Cultivars of the plant produce fruits in different colors, including red, yellow, orange, green, white, and purple. Bell peppers are sometimes grouped with less pungent pepper varieties as "sweet peppers". Peppers are native to Mexico, Central America, and northern South America. Pepper seeds were imported to Spain in 1493, and from there, spread to Europe and Asia. China is the world's largest pepper producer. Preferred growing conditions for bell peppers include warm, moist soil in a temperate range of 21 to 29 °C (70 to 84 °F).[3]Contents1 Nomenclature 2 Colors 3 Nutritional value 4 Production 5 Gallery 6 See also 7 ReferencesNomenclature[edit] The misleading name "pepper" was given by Europeans when Christopher Columbus brought the plant back to Europe
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Onions
The onion ( Allium
Allium
cepa L., from Latin cepa "onion"), also known as the bulb onion or common onion, is a vegetable that is the most widely cultivated species of the genus Allium. Its close relatives include the garlic, shallot, leek, chive,[2] and Chinese onion.[3] This genus also contains several other species variously referred to as onions and cultivated for food, such as the Japanese bunching onion ( Allium
Allium
fistulosum), the tree onion (A. ×proliferum), and the Canada onion ( Allium
Allium
canadense). The name "wild onion" is applied to a number of Allium
Allium
species, but A. cepa is exclusively known from cultivation
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Pasta
Pasta
Pasta
(Italian pronunciation: [ˈpasta]) is a staple food[1] of traditional Italian cuisine, with the first reference dating to 1154 in Sicily.[2] Also commonly used to refer to the variety of pasta dishes, pasta is typically made from an unleavened dough of a durum wheat flour mixed with water or eggs and formed into sheets or various shapes, then cooked by boiling or baking. As an alternative for those wanting a different taste, or who need to avoid products containing gluten, some pastas can be made using rice flour in place of wheat.[3][4] Pastas may be divided into two broad categories, dried (pasta secca) and fresh (pasta fresca). Most dried pasta is commercially produced via an extrusion process although it can be produced in most homes
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Submarine Sandwich
A submarine sandwich, also known as a sub, hoagie, hero, filled roll, grinder, wedge, spukie, poorboy, po'boy or Italian sandwich, is the name given in the United States
United States
to a type of sandwich that consists of a length of bread or roll split lengthwise and filled with a variety of meats, cheeses, vegetables, and condiments.[1][2] The sandwich has no standardized name,[1] with over a dozen variations used around the world.[3] Larger submarine sandwiches, particularly those that are longer in length or overstuffed with greater quantities of ingredients than usual, are sometimes called battleship sandwiches,
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Main Course
The main course is the featured or primary dish in a meal consisting of several courses. It usually follows the entrée ("entry") course.Contents1 Usage 2 Serving 3 See also 4 References 5 Bibliography 6 External linksUsage[edit] In the United States and Canada (except Quebec), the main course may be called "entrée".[1][2][3][4] English-speaking Québécois follow the French use of the term. According to linguist Dan Jurafsky, North American usage ("entrée") retains the original French meaning of a substantial meat course.[5]A sirloin steak dinner. This may be the main course of a meal.Serving[edit] The main dish is usually the heaviest, heartiest, and most complex or substantial dish on a menu. The main ingredient is usually meat, fish or another protein source. It is most often preceded by an appetizer, soup or salad, and followed by a dessert
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Italian Diaspora
The Italian diaspora
Italian diaspora
is the large-scale emigration of Italians
Italians
from Italy. There are two major Italian diasporas in Italian history. The first diaspora began in 1861 with the Unification of Italy
Italy
and ended in the 1920s with the rise of the Italian Fascism. The second diaspora started after the end of World War II
World War II
and roughly concluded in the 1970s. The largest voluntary emigration in documented history was between the period of 1880 and 1976 about 13 million Italians
Italians
leaving the country permanently.[1] By 1978, it was estimated that about 25 million Italians
Italians
were residing outside Italy.[2] A third wave is being reported in present times, due to the difficulties caused by the financial crisis of the early 21st century, especially among the young
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