HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Pakistan
Coordinates: 30°N 70°E / 30°N 70°E / 30; 70 Islamic Republic
Islamic Republic
of Pakistan اِسلامی جمہوریہ پاكِستان‬ (Urdu) Islāmī Jumhūriyah Pākistān[1]FlagEmblemMotto: Īmān, Ittihād, Nazam ایمان، اتحاد، نظم‬ (Urdu) "Faith, Unity, Discipline" [2]Anthem: Qaumī Tarānah قَومی ترانہ‬ "The National Anthem"[3]Area controlled by Pakistan
[...More...]

"Pakistan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ethnic Groups
An ethnic group, or an ethnicity, is a category of people who identify with each other based on similarities such as common ancestry, language, society, culture or nation.[1][2] Ethnicity is usually an inherited status based on the society in which one lives. Membership of an ethnic group tends to be defined by a shared cultural heritage, ancestry, origin myth, history, homeland, language or dialect, symbolic systems such as religion, mythology and ritual, cuisine, dressing style, art, and physical appearance. Ethnic groups, derived from the same historical founder population, often continue to speak related languages and share a similar gene pool
[...More...]

"Ethnic Groups" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
[...More...]

"Geographic Coordinate System" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Islam
Islam
Islam
(/ˈɪslɑːm/)[note 1] is an Abrahamic monotheistic religion teaching that there is only one God
God
(Allah)[1] and that Muhammad
Muhammad
is the messenger of God.[2][3] It is the world's second-largest religion[4] and the fastest-growing major religion in the world,[5][6][7] with over 1.8 billion followers or 24.1% of the global population,[8] known as Muslims.[9] Muslims make up a majority of the population in 50 countries.[4] Islam
Islam
teaches that God
God
is merciful, all-powerful, unique[10] and has guided mankind through prophets, revealed scriptures and natural signs.[3][11] The primary scriptures of Islam
Islam
are the Quran, viewed by Muslims as the verbatim word of God, and the teachings and normative example (called the sunnah, composed of accounts called hadith) of Muhammad
Muhammad
(c
[...More...]

"Islam" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Demonym
A demonym (/ˈdɛmənɪm/; δῆμος dẽmos "people, tribe", ὄόνομα ónoma "name") is a word that identifies residents or natives of a particular place, which is derived from the name of that particular place.[1] It is a neologism (i.e., a recently minted term); previously gentilic was recorded in English dictionaries, e.g., the Oxford
Oxford
English Dictionary and Chambers Twentieth Century Dictionary.[2][3][4] Examples of demonyms include Swahili for a person of the Swahili coast and Cochabambino for a person from the city of Cochabamba. Demonyms do not always clearly distinguish place of origin or ethnicity from place of residence or citizenship, and many demonyms overlap with the ethnonym for the ethnically dominant group of a region
[...More...]

"Demonym" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

National Language
A national language is a language (or language variant, e.g. dialect) that has some connection—de facto or de jure—with people and the territory they occupy. There is little consistency in the use of this term. One or more languages spoken as first languages in the territory of a country may be referred to informally or designated in legislation as national languages of the country. National or official languages are mentioned in over 150 world constitutions.[1] C.M.B
[...More...]

"National Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Federal Parliamentary Republic
A federal parliamentary republic refers to a federation of states with a republican form of government that is, more or less, dependent upon the confidence of parliaments at both the national and subnational levels
[...More...]

"Federal Parliamentary Republic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Saraiki People
Predominantly Sunni Islam Minority Hinduism, Christianity
Christianity
and SikhismSaraiki childrenThe Saraikis (Saraiki: سرائیکی قوم‎), also known as Multanis,[1] are an ethnolinguistic group in central and southeastern Pakistan, primarily southern Punjab. Their language is Saraiki.[2] Saraiki people
Saraiki people
did not see themselves as a distinct ethnic group until the 1960s.[3] An Islamic identity formed the basis of the majority community's group consciousness for centuries prior to the establishment of Pakistan.[3] The Saraiki people
Saraiki people
follow many religions, though most are predominantly followers of Islam. A small minority of Saraikis follow Christianity, Sikhism
Sikhism
and Hinduism
[...More...]

"Saraiki People" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Kashmiri Language
Kashmiri (/kæʃˈmɪəri/)[6] (कॉशुर, کأشُر‬), or Koshur (pronounced kọ̄šur or kạ̄šur[7]) is a language from the Dardic subgroup[8] of Indo-Aryan languages
Indo-Aryan languages
and it is spoken primarily in the Kashmir Valley
Kashmir Valley
and Chenab Valley of Jammu and Kashmir.[9][10][11] There are over 5 million Kashmiri speakers in Jammu and Kashmir
Jammu and Kashmir
and among the Kashmiri diaspora
Kashmiri diaspora
in other states of India,[7][12] and about 130,000 in the Neelam Valley
Neelam Valley
and Leepa Valley
Leepa Valley
of Azad Kashmir, Pakistan.[13] The Kashmiri language
Kashmiri language
is one of the 22 scheduled languages of India,[14] and is a part of the eighth Schedule in the constitution of the Jammu and Kashmir
[...More...]

"Kashmiri Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Domaaki Language
Domaakí, also known as Dumaki or Domaá, is a Dardic language spoken by a few hundred people living in Gilgit-Baltistan, Pakistan. Domaaki is the traditional tongue of the Dóoma (sg. Dóom), a small ethnic group scattered in extended family units among larger host communities
[...More...]

"Domaaki Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Kohistani Language
Indus
Indus
Kohistani is a Dardic language spoken in part of the Indus valley in Kohistan District, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa
Khyber Pakhtunkhwa
Province, Pakistan. The language was referred to as Maiyã (Mayon) or Shuthun by early researchers, but subsequent observations have not verified that these names are known locally.[3] It is also known as Abasin Kohistani.[citation needed]Contents1 Phonology1.1 Vowels 1.2 Consonants2 See also 3 References 4 BibliographyPhonology[edit] The phonology of Indus
Indus
Kohistani varies between its major dialects as shown below.[4] Vowels[edit]Front Central BackClose i iːu uːMid e eːo oːOpena aːIn the Kanyawali dialect, the back vowels /u/ and /o/ are described as variants of each other, as are the front vowels /i/ and /e/. Consonants[edit] The consonant inventory of Indus
Indus
Kohistani is shown in the chart below
[...More...]

"Kohistani Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Yidgha Language
The Yidgha language is an Eastern Iranian language of the Pamir group spoken in the upper Lotkoh Valley (Tehsil Lotkoh) of Chitral in the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa
Khyber Pakhtunkhwa
province of Pakistan. Yidgha is similar to the Munji language spoken on the Afghan side of the border. The Garam Chashma area became important during the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan because the Soviets were unable to stop the flow of arms and men back and forth across the Dorah Pass
Dorah Pass
that separates Chitral from Badakshan
Badakshan
in Afghanistan
[...More...]

"Yidgha Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Dameli Language
Dameli is a Dardic language spoken by approximately 5,000 people in the Domel Valley, in the Chitral
Chitral
District of Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa province of Pakistan. The Domel or Damel Valley is about ten miles south of Drosh
Drosh
on the East Side of the Chitral
Chitral
or Kunar river, on the road from the Mirkhani Fort to the pass of Arandu. Dameli is still the main language in the villages where it is spoken, and it is regularly learned by children
[...More...]

"Dameli Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Gawar-Bati Language
Gawar-Bati (Narsati) is a Dardic language spoken in Chitral, Pakistan and across the border in Afghanistan. It is also known in Chitral
Chitral
as Aranduyiwar, because it is spoken in Arandu, which is the last village in lower Chitral
Chitral
and is also across the border from Berkot in Afghanistan. There are about 9,000 speakers of Gawar-Bati, with 1,500 in Pakistan, and 7,500 in Afghanistan. The name Gawar-Bati means "speech of the Gawar",[3] a people detailed by the Cacopardos in their study of the Hindu Kush.[4]Contents1 Study and classification 2 Phonology2.1 Vowels 2.2 Consonants3 Notes and references 4 Further reading 5 External linksStudy and classification[edit] The Gawar-Bati Language has not been given serious study by linguists, except that it is mentioned by George Morgenstierne (1926) and Kendall Decker (1992). It is classified as a Dardic language
[...More...]

"Gawar-Bati Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Balti Language
Balti (Tibetan: སྦལ་ཏི།, Wylie: bal ti skad; Nastaʿlīq script: بلتی‬) is a Tibetic language spoken in the Baltistan region of Gilgit-Baltistan, Pakistan, the Nubra Valley
Nubra Valley
of Leh district, and in the Kargil district
Kargil district
of Jammu and Kashmir, India.[3] It is quite different from Standard Tibetan. Many sounds of Old Tibetan that were lost in Standard Tibetan
Standard Tibetan
are retained in the Balti language. It also has a simple pitch accent system only in multi-syllabic words[4] while Standard Tibetan
Standard Tibetan
has a complex and distinct pitch system that includes tone contour.Contents1 Ethnography 2 Classification 3 Script 4 Areas 5 Evolution 6 Literature 7 See also 8 References 9 Bibliography 10 External linksEthnography[edit] All people living in Baltistan
Baltistan
may be referred to as Balti
[...More...]

"Balti Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Kalash Language
Kalasha (locally: Kalashamondr) is an Indo-European language in the Indo-Aryan branch spoken by the Kalash people, further classified as a Dardic language in the Chitral
Chitral
group.[3] The Kalasha language
Kalasha language
is phonologically atypical because it contrasts plain, long, nasal and retroflex vowels as well as combinations of these (Heegård & Mørch 2004). Kalasha is spoken by the Kalash people
Kalash people
who reside in the remote valleys of Bumburet, Birir and Rumbur, which are west of Ayun, which is ten miles down the river from Chitral
Chitral
Town, high in the Hindu Kush mountains in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa
Khyber Pakhtunkhwa
province of Pakistan. The Kalash have their own religion, with gods and goddesses. There are an estimated 5,000 speakers of Kalasha.[4] Kalasha should not be confused with the nearby Nuristani language Waigali (Kalasha-ala)
[...More...]

"Kalash Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.