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Ogre
An ogre (feminine ogress) is a term used in myth and folk tales for a variety of abominable and brutish hominid monsters, informally large, unpleasant, grotesque, predatory, and typically cannibalistic towards normal human beings, infants, and children. Ogres and similar creatures feature in mythology, folklore, and fiction around the world, appearing in many classic works of literature and fairy tales. Ogres vary in size depending on the depiction, ranging from moderately large and heavyset by human standards to inhuman and disproportionate giants. Common features include disproportionately large heads, abundant hair, unusually colored skin, strong body, a voracious appetite, and a generally hideous appearance, odor, and manner
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Orpheus
Orpheus
Orpheus
(/ˈɔːrfiəs, ˈɔːrfjuːs/; Greek: Ὀρφεύς) is a legendary musician, poet, and prophet in ancient Greek religion and myth. The major stories about him are centered on his ability to charm all living things and even stones with his music, his attempt to retrieve his wife, Eurydice, from the underworld, and his death at the hands of those who could not hear his divine music
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Sinbad The Sailor
Sinbad
Sinbad
or Sindbad the Sailor (Arabic: ٱلسِّنْدِبَادُ ٱلْبَحرِيّ‎, translit. as-Sindibādu l-Baḥriyy) is a fictional sailor and the hero of a story-cycle of Middle Eastern origin; he is described as living in Baghdad, during the Abbasid Caliphate
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Beauty And The Beast
Beauty
Beauty
and the Beast (French: La Belle et la Bête) is a traditional fairy tale written by French novelist Gabrielle-Suzanne Barbot de Villeneuve and published in 1740 in La Jeune Américaine et les contes marins (The Young American and Marine Tales).[1] Her lengthy version was abridged, rewritten, and published first by Jeanne-Marie Leprince de Beaumont in 1756 in Magasin des enfants[2] (Children's Collection) and by
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Roundel (heraldry)
A roundel is a circular charge in heraldry. Roundels are among the oldest charges used in coats of arms, dating from the start of the age of heraldry in Europe, circa 1200–1215. Roundels are typically a solid colour but may be charged with an item or be any of the furs used in heraldry. Roundels are similar to the annulet, which some heralds would refer to as a false roundel.[1]Contents1 Terms for roundels 2 Special
Special
roundels2.1 Fountain3 Semy 4 See also 5 ReferencesTerms for roundels[edit] In some languages, the heraldic roundel has a unique name specific to its tincture, based on the Old French tradition
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Beowulf
Beowulf
Beowulf
(/ˈbeɪoʊwʊlf/ Old English: [ˈbeːo̯ˌwulf]) is an Old English
Old English
epic poem consisting of 3,182 alliterative lines. It may be the oldest surviving long poem in Old English
Old English
and is commonly cited as one of the most important works of Old English
Old English
literature. A date of composition is a matter of contention among scholars; the only certain dating pertains to the manuscript, which was produced between 975 and 1025.[2] The author was an anonymous Anglo-Saxon poet, referred to by scholars as the " Beowulf
Beowulf
poet".[3] The poem is set in Scandinavia. Beowulf, a hero of the Geats, comes to the aid of Hrothgar, the king of the Danes, whose mead hall in Heorot has been under attack by a monster known as Grendel
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Cyclops
A cyclops (/ˈsaɪklɒps/ SY-klops; Ancient Greek: Κύκλωψ, Kyklōps; plural cyclopes /saɪˈkloʊpiːz/ sy-KLOH-peez; Ancient Greek: Κύκλωπες, Kyklōpes), in Greek mythology
Greek mythology
and later Roman mythology, is a member of a primordial race of giants, each with a single eye in the center of his forehead.[1] The word "cyclops" literally means "round-eyed"[2] or "circle-eyed".[3] Hesiod
Hesiod
described three one-eyed cyclopes who served as builders, blacksmiths, and craftsmen: Brontes, Steropes and Arges, the sons of Uranus and Gaia, brothers of the Titans.[4] Homer
Homer
described another group of mortal herdsmen or shepherd cyclopes, the sons of Poseidon.[5] Other accounts were written by the playwright Euripides, poet Theocritus
Theocritus
and Roman epic poet Virgil. In Hesiod's Theogony, Zeus releases three cyclopes from the dark pit of Tartarus
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Polyphemus
Polyphemus
Polyphemus
(/ˌpɒlɪˈfiːməs/; Greek: Πολύφημος Polyphēmos) is the giant son of Poseidon
Poseidon
and Thoosa in Greek mythology, one of the Cyclopes described in Homer's Odyssey. His name means "abounding in songs and legends".[1] Polyphemus
Polyphemus
first appears as a savage man-eating giant in the ninth book of the Odyssey
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Homer
Homer
Homer
(/ˈhoʊmər/; Greek: Ὅμηρος [hómɛːros], Hómēros) is the name ascribed by the ancient Greeks to the legendary author of the Iliad
Iliad
and the Odyssey, two epic poems which are the central works of ancient Greek literature. The Iliad
Iliad
is set during the Trojan War, the ten-year siege of the city of Troy
Troy
by a coalition of Greek kingdoms. It focuses on a quarrel between King Agamemnon
Agamemnon
and the warrior Achilles
Achilles
lasting a few weeks during the last year of the war. The Odyssey
Odyssey
focuses on the journey home of Odysseus, king of Ithaca, after the fall of Troy. Many accounts of Homer's life circulated in classical antiquity, the most widespread being that he was a blind bard from Ionia, a region of central coastal Anatolia
Anatolia
in present-day Turkey
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Odyssey
The Odyssey
The Odyssey
(/ˈɒdəsi/;[1] Greek: Ὀδύσσεια Odýsseia, pronounced [o.dýs.sej.ja] in Classical Attic) is one of two major ancient Greek epic poems attributed to Homer. It is, in part, a sequel to the Iliad, the other work ascribed to Homer. The Odyssey
The Odyssey
is fundamental to the modern Western canon; it is the second-oldest extant work of Western literature, while the Iliad
Iliad
is the oldest. Scholars believe the Odyssey
Odyssey
was composed near the end of the 8th century BC, somewhere in Ionia, the Greek coastal region of Anatolia.[2] The poem mainly focuses on the Greek hero Odysseus
Odysseus
(known as Ulysses in Roman myths), king of Ithaca, and his journey home after the fall of Troy
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Luigi Pulci
Luigi Pulci (Italian pronunciation: [luˈiːdʒi ˈpultʃi]; 15 August 1432 – 11 November 1484) was an Italian poet best known for his Morgante, an epic and parodistic poem about a giant who is converted to Christianity
Christianity
by Orlando and follows the knight in many adventures. Pulci was born in Florence. His patrons were the Medicis, especially Lorenzo Medici, who sent Pulci on diplomatic missions. Even so, sometime around 1470 Pulci needed more money and went into the service of Robert Sanseverino, a northern condottiere. His brother Luca (1431–1470) was also a writer. His brother Luca's works, all in the Italian language, include Pistole, Driadeo d'amore, and Ciriffo Calvaneo.Contents1 Morgante 2 See also 3 References 4 Sources 5 External linksMorgante[edit] Main article: Morgante The poem Morgante is composed of 28 cantari (chapters) written in ottava rima
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J.R.R. Tolkien
First World WarBattle of the SommeJohn Ronald Reuel Tolkien, CBE FRSL (/ˈtɒlkiːn/;[a] 3 January 1892 – 2 September 1973) was an English writer, poet, philologist, and university professor who is best known as the author of the classic high fantasy works The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings, and The Silmarillion. He served as the Rawlinson and Bosworth Professor of Anglo-Saxon and Fellow of Pembroke College, Oxford, from 1925 to 1945 and Merton Professor of English Language and Literature and Fellow of Merton College, Oxford, from 1945 to 1959.[1] He was at one time a close friend of C. S. Lewis—they were both members of the informal literary discussion group known as the Inklings
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Walter Crane
Walter Crane
Walter Crane
(15 August 1845 – 14 March 1915) was an English artist and book illustrator. He is considered to be the most influential, and among the most prolific, children’s book creators of his generation[1] and, along with Randolph Caldecott
Randolph Caldecott
and Kate Greenaway, one of the strongest contributors to the child's nursery motif that the genre of English children's illustrated literature would exhibit in its developmental stages in the latter 19th century. Crane's work featured some of the more colourful and detailed beginnings of the child-in-the-garden motifs that would characterize many nursery rhymes and children's stories for decades to come. He was part of the Arts and Crafts movement
Arts and Crafts movement
and produced an array of paintings, illustrations, children's books, ceramic tiles and other decorative arts
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French Language
French (le français [lə fʁɑ̃sɛ] ( listen) or la langue française [la lɑ̃ɡ fʁɑ̃sɛz]) is a Romance language
Romance language
of the Indo-European family. It descended from the Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
of the Roman Empire, as did all Romance languages. French has evolved from Gallo-Romance, the spoken Latin
Latin
in Gaul, and more specifically in Northern Gaul. Its closest relatives are the other langues d'oïl—languages historically spoken in northern France
France
and in southern Belgium, which French (Francien) has largely supplanted. French was also influenced by native Celtic languages
Celtic languages
of Northern Roman Gaul
Gaul
like Gallia Belgica
Gallia Belgica
and by the (Germanic) Frankish language of the post-Roman Frankish invaders
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Chrétien De Troyes
Chrétien de Troyes
Troyes
(French: [kʁe.tjɛ̃ də.tʁwa]) was a late-12th-century French poet and trouvère known for his work on Arthurian subjects, and for originating the character Lancelot. This work represents some of the best-regarded of medieval literature. His use of structure, particularly in Yvain, the Knight of the Lion, has been seen as a step towards the modern novel
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Perceval, The Story Of The Grail
Perceval, the story of the Grail
Grail
(French: Perceval, le Conte du Graal) is the unfinished fifth romance of Chrétien de Troyes, who lived from around 1130 to the early 1190s AD, and is dedicated to Chrétien's patron Philip, Count of Flanders.[1] It was written during the 1180s or 1190s AD and likely left unfinished because of the death of either Philip in 1191, while crusading at Acre, or Chretien himself. Chrétien claimed to be working from a source given to him by Philip. The poem relates the adventures and growing pains of the young knight Perceval but the story breaks off. There follows an adventure of Gawain
Gawain
of similar length that also remains incomplete
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