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Odyssey
The Odyssey
The Odyssey
(/ˈɒdəsi/;[1] Greek: Ὀδύσσεια Odýsseia, pronounced [o.dýs.sej.ja] in Classical Attic) is one of two major ancient Greek epic poems attributed to Homer. It is, in part, a sequel to the Iliad, the other work ascribed to Homer. The Odyssey
The Odyssey
is fundamental to the modern Western canon; it is the second-oldest extant work of Western literature, while the Iliad
Iliad
is the oldest. Scholars believe the Odyssey
Odyssey
was composed near the end of the 8th century BC, somewhere in Ionia, the Greek coastal region of Anatolia.[2] The poem mainly focuses on the Greek hero Odysseus
Odysseus
(known as Ulysses in Roman myths), king of Ithaca, and his journey home after the fall of Troy
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Sparta
Coordinates: 37°4′55″N 22°25′25″E / 37.08194°N 22.42361°E / 37.08194; 22.42361LacedaemonΣπάρτα / Λακεδαίμων900s–192 BCLambda was used by the Spartan army
Spartan army
as a symbol of Lacedaemon (Λακεδαίμων)Territory of ancient SpartaCapital SpartaLanguages Doric GreekReligion Greek polytheismGovernment Diarchy OligarchyKing See listLegislature GerousiaHistorical era Classical antiquity •  Foundation 900s BC •  Messenian War 685–668 BC •  Battle of Thermopylae 480 BC •  Peloponnesian War 431–404 BC •  Battle of Mantinea 362 BC •  Annexed by Achaea 192 BCPreceded by Succeeded byGreek Dark AgesAchaean LeagueRoman RepublicThis article contains special characters. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols.Hollow Lacedaemon
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Eugammon Of Cyrene
Eugammon of Cyrene (Greek: Εὐγάμων ὁ Κυρηναῖος) was an early Greek poet to whom the epic Telegony was ascribed. According to Clement of Alexandria, he stole the poem from the legendary early poet Musaeus; meaning, possibly, that a version of a long-existing traditional epic was written down by Eugammon. He is said to have flourished 567/6 BC.[1][2] References[edit]^ Eusebius, Chronicle, "Olympiad", 53.2. ^ Clement of Alexandria. Stromata, 6.25.2.This article about an Ancient Greek poet is a stub
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English Language
English is a West Germanic language
West Germanic language
that was first spoken in early medieval England
England
and is now a global lingua franca.[4][5] Named after the Angles, one of the Germanic tribes that migrated to England, it ultimately derives its name from the Anglia (Angeln) peninsula in the Baltic Sea. It is closely related to the Frisian languages, but its vocabulary has been significantly influenced by other Germanic languages, particularly Norse (a North Germanic
North Germanic
language), as well as by Latin
Latin
and Romance languages, especially French.[6] English has developed over the course of more than 1,400 years. The earliest forms of English, a set of Anglo-Frisian dialects brought to Great Britain by Anglo-Saxon settlers in the 5th century, are called Old English
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Cinaethon Of Sparta
Cinaethon of Sparta (Greek: Κιναίθων ὁ Λακεδαιμόνιος Kinaithon ho Lakedaimonios) is a legendary Greek poet to whom different sources ascribe the lost epics Oedipodea, Little Iliad and Telegony. Eusebius says that he flourished in 764/3 BC.[1][2]Contents1 Select editions and translations1.1 Critical editions 1.2 Translations2 Notes 3 ReferencesSelect editions and translations[edit] Critical editions[edit]Kinkel, G. (1877), Epicorum Graecorum fragmenta, vol. 1, Leipzig  External link in title= (help). Allen, T.W. (1912), Homeri opera. Tomus V: Hymni, Cyclus, Fragmenta, Margites, Batrachomyomachia, Vitae, Oxford, ISBN 0-19-814534-9 . Bernabé, A. (1988), Poetae epici Graecae, pars i, Leipzig, ISBN 978-3-598-71706-2 . Davies, M. (1988), Epicorum Graecorum fragmenta, Göttingen, ISBN 978-3-525-25747-0 .Translations[edit]Evelyn-White, H.G. (1936), Hesiod, the Homeric Hymns, and Homerica, Loeb Classical Library, no
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Ancient Rome
In historiography, ancient Rome
Rome
is Roman civilization from the founding of the city of Rome
Rome
in the 8th century BC to the collapse of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in the 5th century AD, encompassing the Roman Kingdom, Roman Republic
Roman Republic
and Roman Empire
Roman Empire
until the fall of the western empire.[1] The term is sometimes used to just refer to the kingdom and republic periods, excluding the subsequent empire.[2] The civilization began as an Italic settlement in the Italian peninsula, dating from the 8th century BC, that grew into the city of Rome
Rome
and which subsequently gave its name to the empire over which it ruled and to the widespread civilisation the empire developed
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Musaeus Of Athens
Musaeus of Athens (Greek: Μουσαῖος, Mousaios) was a legendary polymath, philosopher, historian, prophet, seer, priest, poet, and musician, said to have been the founder of priestly poetry in Attica. He composed dedicatory and purificatory hymns and prose treatises, and oracular responses.Contents1 Attributed works 2 Reputation in antiquity 3 References 4 External linksAttributed works[edit] Herodotus reports that, during the reign of Peisistratus at Athens, the scholar Onomacritus collected and arranged the oracles of Musaeus but inserted forgeries of his own devising, later detected by Lasus of Hermione.[1] The mystic and oracular verses and customs of Attica, especially of Eleusis, are connected with his name
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Anatolia
Anatolia
Anatolia
(Modern Greek: Ανατολία, Anatolía, from Ἀνατολή, Anatolḗ, modern pronunciation Anatolí;[needs IPA] Turkish: Anadolu "east" or "(sun)rise"), also known as Asia
Asia
Minor (in Medieval and Modern Greek: Μικρά Ἀσία, Mīkrá AsíaTurkish: Küçük Asya, , modern pronunciation Mikrá Asía – "small Asia"), Asian Turkey, the Anatolian peninsula, or the Anatolian plateau, is the westernmost protrusion of Asia, which makes up the majority of modern-day Turkey. The region is bounded by the Black Sea
Black Sea
to the north, the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
to the south, and the Aegean Sea
Aegean Sea
to the west
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Ionia
Ionia
Ionia
(Ancient Greek: Ἰωνία, Ionía or Ἰωνίη, Ioníe) was an ancient region on the central part of the western coast of Anatolia in present-day Turkey, the region nearest İzmir, which was historically Smyrna. It consisted of the northernmost territories of the Ionian League
Ionian League
of Greek settlements. Never a unified state, it was named after the Ionian tribe who, in the Archaic Period (600–480 BC), settled mainly the shores and islands of the Aegean Sea. Ionian states were identified by tradition and by their use of Eastern Greek. Ionia
Ionia
proper comprised a narrow coastal strip from Phocaea
Phocaea
in the north near the mouth of the river Hermus (now the Gediz), to Miletus in the south near the mouth of the river Maeander, and included the islands of Chios
Chios
and Samos
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Mosaic
A mosaic is a piece of art or image made from the assemblage of small pieces of colored glass, stone, or other materials. It is often used in decorative art or as interior decoration. Most mosaics are made of small, flat, roughly square, pieces of stone or glass of different colors, known as tesserae. Some, especially floor mosaics, are made of small rounded pieces of stone, and called "pebble mosaics". Mosaics have a long history, starting in Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia
in the 3rd millennium BC. Pebble mosaics were made in Tiryns
Tiryns
in Mycenean Greece; mosaics with patterns and pictures became widespread in classical times, both in Ancient Greece
Ancient Greece
and Ancient Rome. Early Christian basilicas from the 4th century onwards were decorated with wall and ceiling mosaics
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Aeolic Greek
In linguistics, Aeolic Greek
Aeolic Greek
(/iːˈɒlɪk/; also Aeolian /iːˈoʊliən/, Lesbian or Lesbic dialect) is the set of dialects of Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
spoken mainly in Boeotia
Boeotia
(a region in Central Greece); Thessaly, in the Aegean island of Lesbos; and the Greek colonies
Greek colonies
of Asia Minor
Asia Minor
(Aeolis). The Aeolic dialect shows many archaisms in comparison to the other Ancient Greek dialects
Ancient Greek dialects
(Attic, Ionic, Doric, Northwestern and Arcadocypriot), as well as many innovations. Aeolic Greek
Aeolic Greek
is widely known as the language of Sappho
Sappho
and of Alcaeus of Mytilene
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La Olmeda
La, LA, or L.A. may refer to:Contents1 Arts and entertainment1.1 Music 1.2 Other media2 Business, organizations, and government agencies 3 Language 4 Places4.1 Europe 4.2 North America 4.3 Elsewhere5 Science, technology, and mathematics5.1 Biology, biochemistry, and medicine 5.2 Computing 5.3 Other uses in science, technology, and mathematics6 Other uses 7 People with the given name, La 8 See alsoArts and entertainment[edit] Music[edit]La, a musical note in the most common form of solmization, as well as in solfège "L.A.", a song by Elliott Smith on Figure 8 (album) L.A. (EP), by Teddy Thompson L.A. (Light Album), a Beach Boys album L.A. (Neil Young song), 1973 The La's, an English rock band L.A. Reid, a prominent music producer Yung L.A., a rapper Lady Antebellum, an American country music trio "L.A." (Amy Macdonald song), 2007Other media[edit]l(a, a poem by E. E
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Pedrosa De La Vega
Pedrosa de la Vega is a municipality located in the province of Palencia, Castile and León, Spain. According to the 2004 census (INE), the municipality has a population of 366 inhabitants. Monuments[edit]Ancient Roman thermae in Roman villae of La Olmeda.Roman villae of La Olmeda': The palatial Late Antique Roman villa at La Olmeda is situated less than 1 km away from the village of Pedrosa. Long known as the provenance of chance finds, it was finally professionally excavated from 1968, and was a declared a Bien de Interés Cultural, 3 April 1996.[1] The site was donated in 1984 to the Diputación de Palencia by its proprietor and discoverer, Javier Cortes Álvarez de Miranda, who had supported the archaeological investigation of the site from 1969 to 1980
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Hellenic Civilization
Ancient Greece
Greece
was a civilization belonging to a period of Greek history from the Greek Dark Ages
Greek Dark Ages
of the 13th–9th centuries BC to the end of antiquity (c. 600 AD). Immediately following this period was the beginning of the Early Middle Ages
Middle Ages
and the Byzantine
Byzantine
era.[1] Roughly three centuries after the Late Bronze Age collapse
Late Bronze Age collapse
of Mycenaean Greece, Greek urban poleis began to form in the 8th century BC, ushering in the period of Archaic Greece
Archaic Greece
and colonization of the Mediterranean Basin. This was followed by the period of Classical Greece, an era that began with the Greco-Persian Wars, lasting from the 5th to 4th centuries BC
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Attic Greek
Attic Greek
Attic Greek
is the Greek dialect of ancient Attica, including of the city of Athens. Of the ancient dialects, it is the most similar to later Greek and is the standard form of the language that is studied in ancient Greek language
Greek language
courses. Attic Greek
Attic Greek
is sometimes included in the Ionic dialect
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British Museum
5,906,716 (2017)[2]Ranked 1st nationallyChairman Sir Richard LambertDirector Hartwig FischerPublic transit access Goodge Street; Holborn; Tottenham Court Road; Russell Square;Website britishmuseum.orgArea 807,000 sq ft (75,000 m2) in 94 GalleriesThe centre of the museum was redeveloped in 2001 to become the Great Court, surrounding the original Reading Room.The British Museum, located in the Bloomsbury
Bloomsbury
area of London, United Kingdom, is a public institution dedicated to human history, art and culture
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