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Nigeria
The Federal Republic
Republic
of Nigeria, commonly referred to as Nigeria (/naɪˈdʒɪəriə/ ( listen)), is a federal republic in West Africa, bordering Benin
Benin
in the west, Chad
Chad
and Cameroon
Cameroon
in the east, and Niger
Niger
in the north. Its coast in the south lies on the Gulf of Guinea
Guinea
in the Atlantic Ocean. It comprises 36 states and the Federal Capital Territory, where the capital, Abuja
Abuja
is located. Nigeria
Nigeria
is officially a democratic secular country.[6] Nigeria
Nigeria
has been home to a number of kingdoms and tribal states over the millennia
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Upper House
An upper house, sometimes called a senate, is one of two chambers of a bicameral legislature (or one of three chambers of a tricameral legislature), the other chamber being the lower house.[1] The house formally designated as the upper house is usually smaller and often has more restricted power than the lower house
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Republic
A republic (Latin: res publica) is a form of government in which the country is considered a "public matter", not the private concern or property of the rulers. The primary positions of power within a republic are not inherited. It is a form of government under which the head of state is not a monarch.[1][2][3] In American English, the definition of a republic refers specifically to a form of government in which elected individuals represent the citizen body[2] and exercise power according to the rule of law under a constitution, including separation of powers with an elected head of state, referred to as a constitutional republic[4][5][6][7] or representative democracy. [8] As of 2017[update], 159 of the world's 206 sovereign states use the word "republic" as part of their official names – not all of these are republics in the sense of having elected governments, nor is the word "republic" used in the names of all nations with elected governments
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Demonym
A demonym (/ˈdɛmənɪm/; δῆμος dẽmos "people, tribe", ὄόνομα ónoma "name") is a word that identifies residents or natives of a particular place, which is derived from the name of that particular place.[1] It is a neologism (i.e., a recently minted term); previously gentilic was recorded in English dictionaries, e.g., the Oxford
Oxford
English Dictionary and Chambers Twentieth Century Dictionary.[2][3][4] Examples of demonyms include Swahili for a person of the Swahili coast and Cochabambino for a person from the city of Cochabamba. Demonyms do not always clearly distinguish place of origin or ethnicity from place of residence or citizenship, and many demonyms overlap with the ethnonym for the ethnically dominant group of a region
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Presidential System
A presidential system is a democratic and republican system of government where a head of government leads an executive branch that is separate from the legislative branch. This head of government is in most cases also the head of state, which is called president. In presidential countries, the executive is elected and is not responsible to the legislature, which cannot in normal circumstances dismiss it. Such dismissal is possible, however, in uncommon cases, often through impeachment. The title "president" has persisted from a time when such person personally presided over the governing body, as with the President
President
of the Continental Congress in the early United States, prior to the executive function being split into a separate branch of government. A presidential system contrasts with a parliamentary system, where the head of government is elected to power through the legislative
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Jju Language
Jju is a Plateau language and the native language of the Bajju people of central Nigeria. It is also locally known as "Kaje". As of 1988, there were approximately 300,000 speakers.[3] Jju is one of the Central Plateau languages.[3][4] References[edit]^ Jju at Ethnologue (18th ed., 2015) ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Jju". Glottolog 3.0. Jena, Germany: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History.  ^ a b "Jju". Ethnologue. Retrieved 2017-05-05.  ^ "Glottolog 3.0 - Jju". glottolog.org
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English Language
English is a West Germanic language
West Germanic language
that was first spoken in early medieval England
England
and is now a global lingua franca.[4][5] Named after the Angles, one of the Germanic tribes that migrated to England, it ultimately derives its name from the Anglia (Angeln) peninsula in the Baltic Sea. It is closely related to the Frisian languages, but its vocabulary has been significantly influenced by other Germanic languages, particularly Norse (a North Germanic
North Germanic
language), as well as by Latin
Latin
and Romance languages, especially French.[6] English has developed over the course of more than 1,400 years. The earliest forms of English, a set of Anglo-Frisian dialects brought to Great Britain by Anglo-Saxon settlers in the 5th century, are called Old English
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Berom Language
Berom (Birom) is a Plateau language of Nigeria. The language is locally numerically important and is consistently spoken by Berom of all ages in rural areas. However, the Berom are shifting to Hausa in cities.[3] The small Cen and Nincut dialects may be separate languages. References[edit]^ Berom at Ethnologue (18th ed., 2015) ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Berom". Glottolog 3.0. Jena, Germany: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History.  ^ "Berom". Ethnologue
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Hyam Language
Hyam, or Jabba, is a regionally important dialect cluster of Plateau languages in Nigeria. Hyam of Nok is the prestige dialect. Blench (2008) treats it, Sait, and Dzar as distinct languages, and notes that Yaat and Ankun may also be separate. It is spoken by the Ham People of Nigeria. References[edit]^ Hyam at Ethnologue (18th ed., 2015) ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Hyam". Glottolog 3.0. Jena, Germany: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History. Blench (2008) Prospecting proto-Plateau
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Jukun Takum Language
Jukun (Njikum), or more precisely Jukun Takum, is a Jukunoid language of Cameroon used as a trade language in Nigeria. Though there are only a few thousand native speakers, and only a dozen in Nigeria (as of 2000), it is spoken as a second language in Nigeria by tens of thousands (40,000 reported in 1979). The name Jukun is a cover term for several related Jukunoid languages, such as the much-more-numerous Jukun Wapan. References[edit]^ a b Jukun at Ethnologue (18th ed., 2015) ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Jukun Takum". Glottolog 3.0
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Urhobo-Isoko
According to the language family tree classification by Ethnologue, Okpe, Urhobo and Uvwie, alongside Eruwa and Isoko, make up the five Southwestern Edoid languages of the Benue-Congo group. Quoting Johnstone (1993), Ethnologue
Ethnologue
puts the population of Urhobo people
Urhobo people
at 546,000, Okpe
Okpe
25,400 (2000) and Uvwie 19,800 (2000). These three languages have geographically neighbouring languages: Izon and Itsekiri to the west and south, Ukwuani
Ukwuani
and Isoko to the east and Edo to the north. Thus, Isoko and Urhobo are similar languages that belong to the same linguistic family.Contents1 Literature 2 Dialects 3 Language
Language
Endangerment 4 Further readingLiterature[edit] There is literature for both the Urhobo and Isoko languages. There are Bibles and Christian hymn
Christian hymn
books for both languages
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Niger
Coordinates: 16°N 8°E / 16°N 8°E / 16; 8 Republic
Republic
of the NigerRépublique du Niger  (French)FlagCoat of armsMotto: "Fraternité, Travail, Progrès" (French) "Fraternity, Work, Progress"Anthem: La NigérienneLocation of  Niger  (dark green)Capital and largest city Niamey 13°32′N 2°05′E / 13.533°N 2.083°E / 13.533; 2.083Official languages FrenchNational languages[1]Arabic BudumaFulfuldeGourmanchémaHausa KanuriZarma & Songhai Tamasheq Tassawa
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Federation
A federation (also known as a federal state) is a political entity characterized by a union of partially self-governing states or regions under a central (federal) government. In a federation, the self-governing status of the component states, as well as the division of power between them and the central government, is typically constitutionally entrenched and may not be altered by a unilateral decision of either party, the states or the federal political body. Alternatively, federation is a form of government in which sovereign power is formally divided between a central authority and a number of constituent regions so that each region retains some degree of control over its internal affairs.[1][2] The governmental or constitutional structure found in a federation is considered to be federalist, or to be an example of federalism. It can be considered the opposite of another system, the unitary state. France, for example, has been unitary for multiple centuries
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Igbira
The Ebira or Egbira people are an ethno-linguistic group of central Nigeria. Many Ebira people are from Kogi State, Kwara State, Nasarawa State and Edo State. Okene was said to be the administrative centre of the Ebira-speaking people in Kogi state before kogi was formed from Kwara, not far from the Niger-Benue confluence. Since the formation of the state, the Ebira Ta'o people are found in four local governments namely: Adavi, Ajaokuta, Okehi and Okene each with their administration headquarters. Ebira Koto are found in Kogi and KotonKarfe LGA Bassa LGA, Lokoja in Kogi and Abaji LGA in the Federal Capital Territory, and Nasarawa in Toto LGA. Another, the Eganyi are found in Ajaokuta LGA
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Gbagyi
Gbagyi or Gbari (plural - Agbagyi)[1] is the name and the language of Gbagyi/Gbari ethnic group who are predominantly found in Central Nigeria, with a population of about 15 million people. Members of the ethnic group speak two dialects. While speakers of the dialects were loosely called Gwari
Gwari
by both the Hausa Fulani and Europeans during pre-colonial Nigeria[2] they prefer to be known as Gbagyi. They live in the Niger, Kaduna, States[citation needed] and the Federal Capital Territory. They are also found in Nasarawa and Kogi States in central Nigeria
Nigeria
Area
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Atyap
The Atyap people, also known as the Kataf by the Hausa people, are an ethnic group that occupy part of the Zangon-Kataf Local Government Area of Kaduna State, Nigeria. They speak the Tyap language, one of the West Plateau languages.[1]Contents1 Culture 2 Vegetation 3 Occupation 4 Marriage 5 Religion5.1 Relationship between the clans6 Language 7 Leadership 8 History 9 ReferencesCulture[edit] The Atyap occupy part of the area of the Nok culture, famous for its terra-cotta figurines. Whether they are related to the people that made these figurines cannot be determined.[2] Vegetation[edit] The vegetation type recognizable in the area is the Guinea Savanna or Savanna woodland type which is dotted or characterized by short and medium size trees, shrubs and perennial mesophytic grasses derived from semi-deciduous forest (Gandu 1985, Jemkur 1991) and the soil type is predominantly sandstones with little gravels
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