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New York Sun
The New York Sun
The New York Sun
was an American[1][2] daily newspaper published in Manhattan
Manhattan
from 2002 to 2008. It debuted on April 16, 2002, adopting the name, motto, and masthead of the earlier New York paper, The Sun (1833–1950). It became the first general-interest broadsheet newspaper to be started in New York City in several decades. Its op-ed page became a prominent platform in the country for conservative viewpoints. Since 2009 The Sun has operated as an online-only publisher of political and economic opinion pieces, as well as occasional arts content.Contents1 History 2 Editorial
Editorial
perspective and reception 3 Features 4 Financial problems, circulation, and end of print run 5 Online version 2009–present 6 Related publication 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] The Sun was founded by a group of investors including publishing magnate Conrad Black
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Adam Kirsch
Adam Kirsch (born 1976) is an American poet and literary critic. He is on the seminar faculty of Columbia University's Center for American Studies,[1] and has taught at YIVO.[2]Contents1 Life and career 2 Critical response 3 Bibliography3.1 Books 3.2 Articles4 References 5 External linksLife and career[edit] Kirsch was born in Los Angeles in 1976.[3] He is the son of lawyer, author, and biblical scholar Jonathan Kirsch. He started writing poetry around the age of 14 after encountering the poetry of T.S. Eliot: "Eliot showed me the possibility of finding in poetry a source of complex intellectual and moral interest."[3] He graduated from Harvard University with a B.A
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City University Of New York
The City University of New York
City University of New York
(CUNY; pron.: /ˈkjuːni/) is the public university system of New York City, and the largest urban university system in the United States. CUNY and the State University of New York (SUNY) are separate and independent university systems, despite the fact that both public institutions receive funding from New York State
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George W. Bush
Governor of TexasGovernorship43rd President of the United StatesPresidencyTimelinePoliciesDomestic Economic ForeignBush Doctrine International tripsLegislation & Programs Pardons SpaceAppointmentsCabinet Judicial AppointmentsFirst termCampaign for the Presidency2000 General election Primaries Bush v. Gore Florida1st inaugurationSeptember 11 attacks War on TerrorismWar in Afghanistan Invasion of IraqEmail controversySecond termRe-election campaign2004 General election Primaries2nd inaugurationWar in Iraq State of the Union, 2006 2007 Iraq
Iraq
surgeDismissal of U.S
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Iraq War
Invasion
Invasion
phase (2003)  United States  United Kingdom  Australia  Poland Peshmerga Supported by:  Canada[1]  Netherlands[2] Invasion
Invasion
phase (
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Islamic Republic Of Iran
Iran
Iran
(Persian: ایران‎ Irān [ʔiːˈɾɒːn] ( listen)), also known as Persia[10] (/ˈpɜːrʒə/),[11] officially the Islamic Republic
Islamic Republic
of Iran (Persian: جمهوری اسلامی ایران‎ Jomhuri-ye Eslāmi-ye Irān ( listen)),[12] is a sovereign state in Western Asia.[13][14] With over 81 million inhabitants,[6] Iran
Iran
is the world's 18th-most-populous country.[15] Comprising a land area of 1,648,195 km2 (636,372 sq mi), it is the second-largest country in the Middle East
Middle East
and the 17th-largest in the world
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Aaron Klein
Aaron Klein (born 1978[1][2]) is an American weekend radio talk show host, author, and senior reporter and Mideast bureau chief for Breitbart News and weekly columnist for The Jewish Press.Contents1 Early life and education 2 Media career 3 Interviews 4 Notable work and views4.1 Schmoozing with Terrorists 4.2 The Manchurian President 4.3 Red Army 4.4 Fool Me Twice 4.5 Impeachable Offenses 4.6 Real Benghazi Story 4.7 Relationship with5 References 6 External linksEarly life and education[edit] Klein grew up in Philadelphia and graduated from Torah Academy Boys High School in Philadelphia.[3] In his book Schmoozing with Terrorists, Klein describes his upbringing: "I was a Talmud-studying Modern Orthodox Jew. I attended Jewish religious schooling my entire life from religious elementary school until college
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Alex Jones (journalist)
Alex S. Jones (born November 19, 1946) is an American journalist who was director of the Shorenstein Center
Shorenstein Center
on Media, Politics and Public Policy at Harvard's John F. Kennedy School of Government
John F. Kennedy School of Government
from July 1, 2000 until June 2015. He won a Pulitzer Prize
Pulitzer Prize
for journalism in 1987.[1]Contents1 Early years and career 2 Personal life 3 References 4 External linksEarly years and career[edit] Jones covered the newspaper industry for The New York Times
The New York Times
from 1983 until 1992
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Joan Shorenstein Center On The Press, Politics, And Public Policy
The Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy is a Harvard University research center that explores the intersection and impact of media, politics and public policy in theory and practice.[1] Among other activities, the center organizes dozens of yearly events for journalists, scholars and the public, many of which take place at the John F. Kennedy Jr. Forum.[2][3] Courses taught by Shorenstein Center professors are also an integral part of the Harvard Kennedy School's curriculum. Since its founding in 1986, the center has also emerged as a source for research on U.S
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Scoop (term)
In journalism, a scoop or exclusive is an item of news reported by one journalist or news organization before others, and of exceptional originality, importance, surprise, excitement, or secrecy. Scoops are important and likely to interest or concern many people. A scoop is typically a new story, or a new aspect to an existing or breaking news story. Generally the story is unexpected, or surprising, or formerly secret, so the scoop typically comes from an exclusive source. Events witnessed by many people generally cannot become scoops, (e.g., a natural disaster, or the announcement at a press conference). However, exclusive news content is not always a scoop, as it may not provide the requisite importance or excitement
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Stephen B. Shepard
Stephen B. Shepard (born July 30, 1939[1]) is an American business journalist and academic who served as editor-in-chief of BusinessWeek magazine and was the founding dean of the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism Born and raised in New York City, Shepard attended the Bronx High School of Science. He received his undergraduate degree from the City College of New York and was awarded a master's degree from Columbia University.[2] He married fellow Newsweek
Newsweek
senior editor Lynn Povich on September 16, 1979, at a ceremony officiated by Rabbi Balfour Brickner.[2] They have two adult children. Shepard was a senior editor at Newsweek
Newsweek
and an editor of the Saturday Review
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The Nation
The Nation
The Nation
is the oldest continuously published weekly magazine in the United States, and the most widely read weekly journal of progressive political and cultural news, opinion, and analysis
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William F. Buckley, Jr.
William Frank Buckley Jr. (born William Francis Buckley;[1] November 24, 1925 – February 27, 2008) was an American conservative author[2] and commentator. He founded National Review
National Review
magazine in 1955, which had a major impact in stimulating the conservative movement; hosted 1,429 episodes of the television show Firing Line (1966–1999), where he became known for his transatlantic accent and wide vocabulary;[3] and wrote a nationally syndicated newspaper column along with numerous spy novels.[4][5] George H. Nash, a historian of the modern American conservative movement, said Buckley was "arguably the most important public intellectual in the United States in the past half century
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Mark Malloch Brown
Malloch is a surname. Notable people with the name include:Curtis Malloch, Canadian politician Douglas Malloch (1877–1938), American poet, writer and editor Edward Malloch (1801–1867), Canadian merchant and politician John Russell Malloch
John Russell Malloch
(1875–1963), Scottish entomologist Jordan Malloch (born 1978), American sprint canoer Kathy Malloch, American nursing scholar Katie Malloch, Canadian broadcaster Lance Malloch-Brown (born 1979), Zimbabwean cricketer Mark Malloch Brown, Baron Malloch-Brown
Mark Malloch Brown, Baron Malloch-Brown
(born 1953), British politician and journalist Ted Malloch (born 1952), American author and consultantThis page lists people with the surname Malloch
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Kofi Annan
Kofi Atta Annan (/ˈkoʊfi ˈænæn/[1]; born 8 April 1938) is a Ghanaian diplomat who served as the seventh Secretary-General of the United Nations
United Nations
from January 1997 to December 2006. Annan and the UN were the co-recipients of the 2001 Nobel Peace Prize.[2] He is the founder and chairman of the Kofi Annan
Kofi Annan
Foundation, as well as chairman of The Elders, an international organization founded by Nelson Mandela.[3][4] Born in Kumasi, Annan went on to study economics at Macalester College, international relations from the Graduate Institute Geneva and management at MIT. Annan joined the UN in 1962, working for the World Health Organization's Geneva
Geneva
office. He went on to work in several capacities at the UN Headquarters including serving as the Under- Secretary-General for peacekeeping between March 1992 and December 1996
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United Nations
The United Nations
United Nations
(UN) is an intergovernmental organization tasked to promote international cooperation and to create and maintain international order. A replacement for the ineffective League of Nations, the organization was established on 24 October 1945 after World War II
World War II
with the aim of preventing another such conflict. At its founding, the UN had 51 member states; there are now 193. The headquarters of the UN is in Manhattan, New York City, and is subject to extraterritoriality. Further main offices are situated in Geneva, Nairobi, and Vienna. The organization is financed by assessed and voluntary contributions from its member states. Its objectives include maintaining international peace and security, promoting human rights, fostering social and economic development, protecting the environment, and providing humanitarian aid in cases of famine, natural disaster, and armed conflict
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