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Mitra
* Mitra
Mitra
is the reconstructed Proto-Indo-Iranian
Proto-Indo-Iranian
name of an Indo-Iranian divinity from which the names and some characteristics of Rigvedic Mitrá and
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Hittites
The Hittites
Hittites
(/ˈhɪtaɪts/) were an Ancient Anatolian people who established an empire centered on Hattusa
Hattusa
in north-central Anatolia around 1600 BC. This empire reached its height during the mid-14th century BC under Suppiluliuma I, when it encompassed an area that included most of Anatolia
Anatolia
as well as parts of the northern Levant
Levant
and Upper Mesopotamia. Between the 15th and 13th centuries BC the Hittite Empire
Empire
came into conflict with the Egyptian Empire, Middle Assyrian Empire
Empire
and the empire of the Mitanni
Mitanni
for control of the Near East. The Assyrians eventually emerged as the dominant power and annexed much of the Hittite empire, while the remainder was sacked by Phrygian newcomers to the region. After c
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IEW
The Indogermanisches etymologisches Wörterbuch (IEW; "Indo-European Etymological Dictionary") was published in 1959 by the Austrian-German comparative linguist and Celtic languages expert Julius Pokorny. It is an updated and slimmed-down reworking of the three-volume Vergleichendes Wörterbuch der indogermanischen Sprachen (1927–1932, by Alois Walde and Julius Pokorny). Both of these works aim to provide an overview of the lexical knowledge of the Proto-Indo-European language
Proto-Indo-European language
accumulated through the early 20th century. The IEW is now significantly outdated, especially as it was conservative even when it was written, ignoring the now integral laryngeal theory, and hardly including any Anatolian material. Editions[edit]French & European Publications (1969), ISBN 0-8288-6602-3 Francke 4th ed. (2002), 5th ed
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Parthian Language
The Parthian language, also known as Arsacid Pahlavi and Pahlawānīg, is a now-extinct ancient Northwestern Iranian language spoken in Parthia, a region of northeastern ancient Iran. Parthian was the language of state of the Arsacid Parthian Empire
Parthian Empire
(248 BC – 224 AD), as well as of its eponymous branches of the Arsacid dynasty of Armenia, Arsacid dynasty of Iberia, and the Arsacid dynasty of Caucasian Albania. This language had a huge impact on Armenian, a large part of whose vocabulary was formed primarily from borrowings from Parthian. Many ancient Parthian words were preserved, and now can be seen only in Armenian.Contents1 Classification 2 Written Parthian 3 Attestations 4 Extinction 5 See also 6 References6.1 Notes 6.2 General references7 External linksClassification[edit] Parthian was a Western Middle Iranian language
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Honesty
Honesty
Honesty
refers to a facet of moral character and connotes positive and virtuous attributes such as integrity, truthfulness, straightforwardness, including straightforwardness of conduct, along with the absence of lying, cheating, theft, etc
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Manichaeans
WesternRevelation Divine illumination Divine lightIslamicTa'wil Irfan Nūr Sufism IsmāʿīlīsmEasternJnana Bodhi PrajnaBuddhism Hinduism Gnostic
Gnostic
sectsList of Gnostic
Gnos

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Vedic Sanskrit
Vedic Sanskrit
Sanskrit
or Aryam (Devanagari: आर्यम् IAST: āryam, "noble") is an Indo-European language, more specifically one branch of the Indo-Iranian group. It is the ancient language of the Vedas
Vedas
of Hinduism, texts compiled over the period of the mid-2nd to mid-1st millennium BCE.[1] It was orally preserved, predating the advent of Brahmi script
Brahmi script
by several centuries
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Treaty
A treaty is an agreement under international law entered into by actors in international law, namely sovereign states and international organizations. A treaty may also be known as an (international) agreement, protocol, covenant, convention, pact, or exchange of letters, among other terms
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Consensus
Consensus
Consensus
decision-making is a group decision-making process in which group members develop, and agree to support a decision in the best interest of the whole. Consensus
Consensus
may be defined professionally as an acceptable resolution, one that can be supported, even if not the "favourite" of each individual. Consensus
Consensus
is defined by Merriam-Webster
Merriam-Webster
as, first, general agreement, and second, group solidarity of belief or sentiment. It has its origin in the Latin
Latin
word cōnsēnsus (agreement), which is from cōnsentiō meaning literally feel together.[1] It is used to describe both the decision and the process of reaching a decision
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Promise
A promise is a commitment by someone to do or not do something. As a noun promise means a declaration assuring that one will or will not do something. As a verb it means to commit oneself by a promise to do or give.[1] It can also mean a capacity for good, similar to a value that is to be realized in the near future.[2] In the law of contract, an exchange of promises is usually held to be legally enforceable, according to the Latin maxim pacta sunt servanda.Contents1 Types 2 Conditional commitment 3 Religion3.1 Christianity 3.2 Islam4 Philosophy 5 Politics 6 Society 7 Psychology 8 See also 9 Notes 10 References 11 External linksTypes[edit] There are many types of promises. There are solemn promises, such as marriage vows or military oaths. There are legal contracts, enforceable by law. Or, there are fairy tale promises, regrettable and problematic at the time they must be honored
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Human Bonding
Human bonding
Human bonding
is the process of development of a close, interpersonal relationship between two or more people. It most commonly takes place between family members or friends,[1] but can also develop among groups, such as sporting teams and whenever people spend time together. Bonding is a mutual, interactive process, and is different from simple liking. Bonding typically refers to the process of attachment that develops between romantic or platonic partners, close friends, or parents and children. This bond is characterized by emotions such as affection and trust. Any two people who spend time together may form a bond. Male bonding refers to the establishment of relationships between men through shared activities
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Mantra
A "mantra" (/ˈmæntrə, ˈmɑːn-, ˈmʌn-/ (Sanskrit: मन्त्र);[2]) is a sacred utterance, a numinous sound, a syllable, word or phonemes, or group of words in Sanskrit
Sanskrit
believed by practitioners to have psychological and spiritual powers.[3][4] Mantra meditation helps to induce an altered state of consciousness.[5] A mantra may or may not have a syntactic structure or literal meaning.[3][6] The earliest mantras were composed in Vedic Sanskrit
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Sogdian Language
The Sogdian language
Sogdian language
was an Eastern Iranian language spoken in the Central Asian region of Sogdia, located in modern-day Uzbekistan, and Tajikistan
Tajikistan
(capital: Samarkand; other chief cities: Panjakent, Fergana, Khujand, and Bukhara), as well as some Sogdian immigrant communities in ancient China. Sogdian is one of the most important Middle Iranian languages, along with Bactrian, Khotanese Saka, Middle Persian, and Parthian. It possesses a large literary corpus. The Sogdian language
Sogdian language
is usually assigned to a Northeastern group of the Iranian languages
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Avesta
The Avesta
Avesta
/əˈvɛstə/ is the primary collection of religious texts of Zoroastrianism, composed in the otherwise unrecorded Avestan language.[1] The Avesta
Avesta
texts fall into several different categories, arranged either by dialect, or by usage. The principal text in the liturgical group is the Yasna, which takes its name from the Yasna
Yasna
ceremony, Zoroastrianism's primary act of worship, and at which the Yasna
Yasna
text is recited
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Artaxerxes II
Artaxerxes II
Artaxerxes II
Mnemon /ˌɑːrtəˈzɜːrksiːz/ (Old Persian: 𐎠𐎼𐎫𐎧𐏁𐏂, meaning "whose reign is through truth")[1] was the Xšâyathiya Xšâyathiyânâm (King of Kings) of Persia from 404 BC until his death in 358 BC. He was a son of Darius II
Darius II
and Parysatis. Greek authors gave him the epithet "Mnemon" (Greek: mnḗmona, in Old Persian: abiataka), meaning "remembering; having a good memory".[2]Contents1 Rise to power 2 Reign 3 Building projects 4 Identification 5 Issue 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksRise to power[edit] Darius II
Darius II
died in 404 BC, just before the final victory of the Egyptian general, Amyrtaeus, over the Persians in Egypt. His successor was his eldest son Arsames who was crowned as Artaxerxes II in Pasargadae. Even before his coronation, Artaxerxes was facing threats to his rule from his younger brother, Cyrus the Younger
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Artaxerxes III
Artaxerxes III
Artaxerxes III
Ochus of Persia
Persia
(/ˌɑːrtəˈzɜːrksiːz/; Old Persian: 𐎠𐎼𐎫𐎧𐏁𐏂 Artaxšaçā)[2] (c. 425 BC – 338 BC) was the Great King (Shah) of Persia
Persia
and the eleventh king of the Achaemenid Empire, as well as the first Pharaoh
Pharaoh
of the 31st dynasty of Egypt. He was the son and successor of Artaxerxes II
Artaxerxes II
and was succeeded by his son, Arses of Persia (also known as Artaxerxes IV)
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