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Lviv Pogroms
The Lviv
Lviv
pogroms were the consecutive massacres of Jews
Jews
living in the city of Lwów (now Lviv, Ukraine), perpetrated by the German commandos and the Ukrainian nationalists from 30 June
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Gruppenführer
Gruppenführer
Gruppenführer
([ˈɡʀʊpn̩.fyːʀɐ], "group leader") was an early paramilitary rank of the Nazi Party
Nazi Party
(NSDAP), first created in 1925 as a senior rank of the SA.[1] The term Gruppenführer
Gruppenführer
is also used for leaders of groups/teams of the police, fire departments, and several other organizations. In 1930, Gruppenführer
Gruppenführer
became an SS rank and was originally bestowed upon those officers who commanded SS-Gruppen and also upon senior officers of the SS command staff. In 1932, the SS was reorganized and the SS-Gruppen were reformed into SS-Abschnitte
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Army Group South
World War IIInvasion of Poland Operation Barbarossa Operation BlueCommandersNotable commandersGerd von Rundstedt Erich von Manstein Fedor von Bock Army Group South
Army Group South
(German: Heeresgruppe Süd) was the name of two German Army Groups during World War II. It was first used in the 1939 September Campaign, along with Army Group North to invade Poland. In the invasion of Poland
Poland
Army Group South
Army Group South
was led by Gerd von Rundstedt and his chief of staff Erich von Manstein. Two years later, Army Group South became one of three army groups into which Germany organised their forces for Operation Barbarossa
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Western Ukraine
Western Ukraine
Ukraine
or West Ukraine
Ukraine
(Ukrainian: Західна Україна) is a geographical and historical relative term used in reference to the western territories of Ukraine. It includes several actual historical regions such as Transcarpathia, Halychyna
Halychyna
including Pokuttia, Volhynia, northern Bukovina
Bukovina
as well as western Podolia. Less often it includes territories of eastern Volhynia, Podolia, and small portion of northern Bessarabia (eastern part of Chernivtsi
Chernivtsi
Oblast). Important cities are Buchach, Chernivtsi, Drohobych, Halych
Halych
(hence - Halychyna), Ivano-Frankivsk, Khotyn, Lutsk, Lviv, Mukacheve, Rivne, Ternopil, Uzhhorod
Uzhhorod
and others
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Judeo-Bolshevism
Jewish Bolshevism, also known as Judeo-Bolshevism, is an antisemitic and anti-communist canard which alleges that the Jews were at the origin of the Russian Revolution and held the primary power among Bolsheviks. Similarly, the Jewish Communism theory implies that Jews have been dominating the Communist movements in the world
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The Lemberg Mosaic
The Lemberg Mosaic, subtitled the "Memoirs of Two who Survived the Destruction of Jewish Galicia," is a book on the Holocaust by Jakob Weiss.[1] This work brings to light the relatively obscure history of the systematic and total destruction of Jewish Lemberg (Lwów, now Lviv in Ukraine). It is presented in the format of a biography,[2] detailing the struggle for survival of four families in the backdrop of two back-to-back invasions of the city and surrounding region by both the Soviets (1939) and the Germans (1941). Overview[edit] Before the Second World War Lviv was known as Lwów
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Organization Of Ukrainian Nationalists
The Organization of Ukrainian Nationalists
Organization of Ukrainian Nationalists
(OUN) (Ukrainian: Організація Українських Націоналістів, (ОУН), Orhanizatsiya Ukrayins'kykh Natsionalistiv) was a Ukrainian far-right fascist political organization established in 1929 in Vienna; it first operated in Western Ukraine
Ukraine
(at the time part of interwar Poland). The OUN emerged as a union between the Ukrainian Military Organization, smaller radical right-wing groups, and right-wing Ukrainian nationalists and intellectuals represented by Dmytro Dontsov, Yevhen Konovalets, Mykola Stsyborsky and other figures.[2][nb 1] The OUN sought to infiltrate legal political parties, universities and other political structures and institutions
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John Paul Himka
John-Paul Himka (born May 18, 1949 in Detroit, Michigan) is an American-Canadian historian and retired professor of history of the University of Alberta in Edmonton.[1] Himka received his BA in Byzantine-Slavonic Studies and Ph.D. in History from University of Michigan in 1971 and 1977 respectively.[1] The title of his Ph.D. dissertation was "Polish and Ukrainian Socialism: Austria, 1867-1890". As a historian Himka was a Marxist in the 1970s-80s, but became influenced by the postmodernism in the 1990s. In 2012 he defined his methodology in history as "eclectic".[2]Contents1 Life1.1 Personal life2 Awards 3 Bibliography 4 References 5 External linksLife[edit] Himka is of mixed ethnic background, Ukrainian (on father's side) and Italian (on mother's). Initially he wanted to become a Greek Catholic priest and studied at St
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Filip Friedman
Filip (Philip) Friedman (27 April 1901, Lemberg – 7 February 1960, New York City) was a Polish-Jewish historian and the author of several books on history and economics. Philip Friedman was born in Lwów in 1901. After graduation from Gymnasia in Lwów, Friedman studied at the Jan Kazimierz University in Lwów, the University of Vienna and the Jewish Paedagogium under Salo Baron. He moved to Łódź in 1925 after receiving his doctorate from the University of Vienna. Friedman taught at a leading Hebrew secondary school in Łódź, as well as at the People’s University of that city, at YIVO in Vilna (1935), and at the Taḥkemoni of Warsaw (1938–1939). He also continued his historical research. In autumn of 1939 he returned to Lwów, where he worked in the Science Academy of Ukraine. When World War II began, he was engaged in writing a comprehensive history of the Jews of Poland from the earliest beginnings through the twentieth century
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Berdychiv
Berdychiv
Berdychiv
(Ukrainian: Бердичів, Polish: Berdyczów, Yiddish: באַרדיטשעװ‎, translit. Bardichev, Russian: Берди́чев, translit. Berdichev) is a historic city in the Zhytomyr Oblast
Zhytomyr Oblast
(province) of northern Ukraine. Serving as the administrative center of the Berdychiv Raion
Berdychiv Raion
(district), the city itself is of direct oblast subordinance, and does not belong to the district. It is located 44 km (27 mi) south of the oblast capital, Zhytomyr
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German–Soviet Frontier Treaty
The German-Soviet Frontier Treaty
German-Soviet Frontier Treaty
was a second supplementary protocol,[1] of the 1939 Hitler-Stalin Pact (known as the German-Soviet Treaty of Nonaggression, or by its original name of the German–Soviet Treaty of Friendship, Cooperation and Demarcation).[2] It was a secret clause as amended on September 28, 1939 by Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
after their joint invasion and occupation of sovereign Poland.[3] It was signed by Joachim von Ribbentrop
Joachim von Ribbentrop
and Vyacheslav Molotov, the foreign ministers of Germany and the Soviet Union respectively, in the presence of Joseph Stalin. The treaty was a follow-up to the first secret protocol of the Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact signed on August 23, 1939 between the two countries prior to their invasion of Poland and the start of World War II
World War II
in Europe
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Zhytomyr
Zhytomyr
Zhytomyr
(Ukrainian: Жито́мир, translit. Žytomyr [ʒɪˈtɔmɪr]; Russian: Жито́мир, translit. Žitomir; Polish: Żytomierz; Yiddish: זשיטאָמיר‎, translit. Žitomir) is a city in the north of the western half of Ukraine. It is the administrative center of Zhytomyr
Zhytomyr
Oblast (province), as well as the administrative center of the surrounding Zhytomyr Raion
Zhytomyr Raion
(district). The city of Zhytomyr
Zhytomyr
is not a part of Zhytomyr
Zhytomyr
Raion: the city itself is designated as its own separate raion within the oblast; moreover Zhytomyr
Zhytomyr
consists of two so-called "raions in a city": Bohunskyi Raion and Koroliovskyi Raion (named in honour of Sergey Korolyov). Zhytomyr
Zhytomyr
occupies an area of 65 square kilometres (25 square miles)
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Vinnytsia
Vinnytsia
Vinnytsia
(Ukrainian: Ві́нниця, translit. Vinnycja, pronounced [ˈʋinːɪtsʲɐ]; Russian: Ви́нница, translit. Vinnica; Polish: Winnica; German: Winniza, and Romanian: Vinița) is a city in west-central Ukraine, located on the banks of the Southern Bug. It is the administrative center of Vinnytsia Oblast
Vinnytsia Oblast
and the largest city in the historic region of Podillia. Administratively, it is incorporated as a town of oblast significance. It also serves as an administrative center of Vinnytsia
Vinnytsia
Raion, one of the 27 districts of Vinnytsia
Vinnytsia
Oblast, though it is not a part of the district
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Symon Petliura
Symon Vasylyovych Petliura[a] (Ukrainian: Си́мон Васи́льович Петлю́ра; May 22, 1879 – May 25, 1926) was a Ukrainian politician and journalist. He was the Supreme Commander of the Ukrainian Army and the President of the Ukrainian National Republic during Ukraine's short-lived sovereignty in 1918–1921, who led Ukraine's struggle for independence following the fall of the Russian Empire
Russian Empire
in 1917. After defeat of the Ukrainian Army he went abroad and led the Ukrainian government into exile
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Richard Breitman
Richard David Breitman, born in 1947, is an American historian best known for his study of the Holocaust. Education and career[edit] Breitman received a B.A. from Yale College
Yale College
(1969), an M.A. from Yale University, and his Ph.D. from Harvard University. He has spent most of his career in the history department at American University
American University
in Washington, D.C., joining the faculty in 1976, becoming a Professor in 1985 and a Distinguished Professor in 2011. He has written extensively about German history, U.S. history, and the Holocaust. Well known books include FDR and the Jews (co-authored with Allan J. Lichtman); The Architect of Genocide: Himmler and the Final Solution; and Official Secrets: What the Nazis Planned, What the British and Americans Knew. He is editor of the scholarly journal Holocaust and Genocide Studies
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Krakivs'ki Visti
The Krakivs'ki Visti
Krakivs'ki Visti
(Ukrainian: Краківські вісті: народний часопис для Генерал-Губернаторства, German: Krakauer Nachrichten – Ukrainische Tageszeitung),[2] was a vehemently antisemitic,[3] Nazi propaganda daily, published during World War II in the Ukrainian language
Ukrainian language
with the German financial aid, and with exposure orchestrated by Joseph Goebbels
Joseph Goebbels
himself.[4] Content[edit] Krakivs'ki visti, with headquarters in Kraków
Kraków
since 1940, republished materials from the German papers for distribution in the General Government territory of occupied Poland, especially the Nazi party organ Völkischer Beobachter, which appeared frequently
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