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Lewis Carroll
Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (/ˈlʌtwɪdʒ ˈdɒdsən/;[1][2][3] 27 January 1832 – 14 January 1898), better known by his pen name Lewis Carroll (/ˈkærəl/), was an English writer, mathematician, logician, Anglican
Anglican
deacon, and photographer. His most famous writings are Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, its sequel Through the Looking-Glass, which includes the poem "Jabberwocky", and the poem The Hunting of the Snark – all examples of the genre of literary nonsense. He is noted for his facility at word play, logic and fantasy
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Deacon
A deacon is a member of the diaconate, an office in Christian churches that is generally associated with service of some kind, but which varies among theological and denominational traditions. In many traditions the diaconate is a clerical office; in others it is for laity
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Parson
In the pre-Reformation church, a parson is the priest of an independent parish church, that is, a parish church not under the control of a larger ecclesiastical or monastic organization. The term is similar to rector and is in contrast to a vicar, a cleric whose revenue is usually, at least partially, appropriated by a larger organization. Today the term is normally used for some parish clergy of non-Roman Catholic churches, in particular in the Anglican tradition in which a parson is the incumbent of a parochial benefice: a parish priest or a rector; in this sense a parson can be compared with a vicar. The title parson can be applied to clergy from certain other Protestant denominations
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Word Play
Word play
Word play
or wordplay[1] (also: play-on-words) is a literary technique and a form of wit in which words used become the main subject of the work, primarily for the purpose of intended effect or amusement. Examples of word play include puns, phonetic mix-ups such as spoonerisms, obscure words and meanings, clever rhetorical excursions, oddly formed sentences, double entendres, and telling character names (such as in the play The Importance of Being Earnest, Ernest being a given name that sounds exactly like the adjective earnest). Word play
Word play
is quite common in oral cultures as a method of reinforcing meaning. Examples of text-based (orthographic) word play are found in languages with or without alphabet-based scripts; for example, see homophonic puns in Mandarin Chinese.Contents1 Techniques 2 Examples 3 Related phenomena 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksTechniques[edit]This section needs expansion
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The Reverend
The Reverend
The Reverend
is an honorific style[1] most often placed before the names of Christian clergy and ministers. There are sometimes differences in the way the style is used in different countries and church traditions. The Reverend
The Reverend
is correctly called a style but is often and in some dictionaries called a title, form of address or title of respect.[2] The style is also sometimes used by leaders in non-Christian religions such as Judaism
Judaism
and Buddhism. The term is an anglicisation of the Latin reverendus, the style originally used in Latin documents in medieval Europe. It is the gerundive or future passive participle of the verb revereri ("to respect; to revere"), meaning "[one who is] to be revered/must be respected". The Reverend
The Reverend
is therefore equivalent to The Honourable or The Venerable
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High Church
The term "high church" refers to beliefs and practices of ecclesiology, liturgy, and theology, generally with an emphasis on formality and resistance to "modernisation." Although used in connection with various Christian traditions, the term originated in and has been principally associated with the Anglican/Episcopal tradition, where it describes Anglican
Anglican
churches using a number of ritual practices associated in the popular mind with Roman Catholicism. The opposite is low church. Contemporary media discussing Anglican
Anglican
churches tend to prefer evangelical to "low church", and Anglo-Catholic
Anglo-Catholic
to "high church", though the terms do not exactly correspond
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List Of English Writers
List of English writers lists writers in English, born or raised in England (or who lived in England for a lengthy period), who already have pages. References for the information here appear on the linked pages. The list is incomplete – please help to expand it by adding page-owning writers who have written extensively in any genre or field, including science and scholarship. Please follow the entry format. A seminal work added to a writer's entry should also have a page. This is a subsidiary to the List of English people
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Church Of England
The Church of England
England
(C of E) is the state church of England.[3][4][5] The Archbishop of Canterbury
Archbishop of Canterbury
(currently Justin Welby) is the most senior cleric, although the monarch is the supreme governor. The Church of England
England
is also the mother church of the international Anglican
Anglican
Communion
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Bishop Of Elphin
The Bishop of Elphin
Bishop of Elphin
(Irish: Easpag Ail Finn) is an episcopal title which takes its name after the village of Elphin, County Roscommon, Ireland. In the Roman Catholic Church
Catholic Church
it remains a separate title, but in the Church of Ireland
Church of Ireland
it has been united with other bishoprics.Contents1 History 2 Pre-Reformation bishops 3 Post-Reformation bishops3.1 Church of Ireland
Church of Ireland
succession 3.2 Roman Catholic succession4 Notes 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] From the time Christianity first arrived in Ireland in the first half of the 5th century (in the form of Palladius's mission), the early church was centred around monastic settlements. Patrick founded such a settlement in an area known as Corcoghlan, now known as Elphin, in 434 or 435
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Westminster School
Westminster School
Westminster School
is an independent day and boarding school in London, England, located within the precincts of Westminster Abbey. With origins before the 12th century, the educational tradition of Westminster probably dates back as far as AD 960, in line with the Abbey's history.[10] Boys are admitted to the Under School at age seven and to the senior school at age thirteen; girls are admitted at age sixteen into the Sixth Form.[11] The school has around 750 pupils; around a quarter are boarders, most of whom go home at wee
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Holy Orders
In the Christian churches, Holy Orders are ordained ministries such as bishop, priest or deacon. In the Roman Catholic (Latin: sacri ordines), Eastern Catholic, Eastern Orthodox (ιερωσύνη [hierōsynē], ιεράτευμα [hierateuma], Священство [Svyashchenstvo]), Oriental Orthodox, Anglican, Assyrian, Old Catholic, Independent Catholic and some Lutheran
Lutheran
churches, holy orders are[clarification needed] the three ministerial orders of bishop, priest and deacon[citation needed], or the sacrament or rite by which candidates are ordained to those orders. Except for Lutherans and some Anglicans, these churches regard ordination as a sacrament (the sacramentum ordinis). The Anglo-Catholic tradition within Anglicanism identifies more with the Roman Catholic position about the sacramental nature of ordination. Denominations have varied conceptions of Holy Orders
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Double First
The British undergraduate degree classification system is a grading structure for undergraduate degrees (bachelor's degrees and integrated master's degrees) in the United Kingdom
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Voting Theory
Voting is a method for a group, such as, a meeting or an electorate to make a decision or express an opinion, usually following discussions, debates or election campaigns. Democracies elect holders of high office by voting. Residents of a place represented by an elected official are called "constituents", and those constituents who cast a ballot for their chosen candidate are called "voters"
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Linear Algebra
Linear
Linear
algebra is the branch of mathematics concerning linear equations such as a 1 x 1 + ⋯ + a n x n = b , displaystyle a_ 1 x_ 1 +cdots +a_ n x_ n =b, linear functions such as ( x 1 , … , x n ) ↦ a 1 x 1 + … + a n x n , displaystyle (x_ 1 ,ldots ,x_ n )mapsto a_ 1 x_ 1 +ldots +a_ n x_ n , and their representations through matrices and vector spaces.[1][2][3] Linear
Linear
algebra is central to almost all areas of mathematics
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Warrington
Warrington
Warrington
is a large town and unitary authority area in Cheshire, England, on the banks of the River Mersey, 20 miles (32 km) east of Liverpool, and 20 miles (32 km) west of Manchester. The population in 2016 was estimated at 208,800,[2] more than double that of 1968 when it became a New Town. Warrington
Warrington
is the largest town in the county of Cheshire. Warrington
Warrington
was founded by the Romans at an important crossing place on the River Mersey. A new settlement was established by the Saxons. By the Middle Ages, Warrington
Warrington
had emerged as a market town at the lowest bridging point of the river
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Irish People
Irish Travellers, Anglo-Irish, Bretons, Cornish, English, Icelanders,[12] Manx, Norse, Scots, Ulster
Ulster
Scots, Welsh Other Northern European
Northern European
ethnic groups* Around 800,000 people born in
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