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Kostinbrod
Kostinbrod
Kostinbrod
(Bulgarian: Костинброд) is a town in western Bulgaria. It is the seat of Kostinbrod
Kostinbrod
Municipality. It is located 15 km west of the capital city of Sofia. It is located on two important transport corridors: Lom — Sofia
Sofia
Thessaloniki
Thessaloniki
and Sofia
Sofia
— Belgrade. The international railway line to Western Europe passes through the municipality, with a train stop at Kostinbrod Station.The vice mayor of Kostinbrod
Kostinbrod
is Adelina Orlova, who has studied literature at SU'Kliment Ohridski'. Young and ambitious woman born in Sofia, who has been living in Kostinbrod
Kostinbrod
ever since
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Thessaloniki
Thessaloniki
Thessaloniki
(Greek: Θεσσαλονίκη, Thessaloníki [θesaloˈnici] ( listen)), also familiarly known as Thessalonica, Salonica, or Salonika is the second-largest city in Greece, with over 1 million inhabitants in its metropolitan area, and the capital of Macedonia, the administrative region of Central Macedonia and the Decentralized Administration of Macedonia and Thrace.[4][5] Its nickname is η Συμπρωτεύουσα (Symprotévousa), literally "the co-capital",[6] a reference to its historical status as the Συμβασιλεύουσα (Symvasilévousa) or "co-reigning" city of the Eastern Roman (Byzantine) Empire, alongside Constantinople.[7] Thessaloniki
Thessaloniki
is located on the Thermaic Gulf, at the northwest corner of the Aegean Sea
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Capital City
A capital city (or simply capital) is the municipality exercising primary status in a country, state, province, or other administrative region, usually as its seat of government. A capital is typically a city that physically encompasses the government's offices and meeting places; the status as capital is often designated by its law or constitution. In some jurisdictions, including several countries, the different branches of government are located in different settlements. In some cases, a distinction is made between the official (constitutional) capital and the seat of government, which is in another place. Capital cities that are also the prime economic, cultural, or intellectual centres of a nation or an empire are sometimes referred to as primate cities
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Ancient Rome
In historiography, ancient Rome
Rome
is Roman civilization from the founding of the city of Rome
Rome
in the 8th century BC to the collapse of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in the 5th century AD, encompassing the Roman Kingdom, Roman Republic
Roman Republic
and Roman Empire
Roman Empire
until the fall of the western empire.[1] The term is sometimes used to just refer to the kingdom and republic periods, excluding the subsequent empire.[2] The civilization began as an Italic settlement in the Italian peninsula, dating from the 8th century BC, that grew into the city of Rome
Rome
and which subsequently gave its name to the empire over which it ruled and to the widespread civilisation the empire developed
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Thermae
In ancient Rome, thermae (from Greek θερμός thermos, "hot") and balneae (from Greek βαλανεῖον balaneion) were facilities for bathing. Thermae
Thermae
usually refers to the large imperial bath complexes, while balneae were smaller-scale facilities, public or private, that existed in great numbers throughout Rome.[1] Most Roman cities had at least one, if not many, such buildings, which were centres not only for bathing, but socializing. Roman bath-houses were also provided for private villas, town houses, and forts. They were supplied with water from an adjacent river or stream, or more normally, by an aqueduct. The water would be heated by a log fire before being channelled into the hot bathing rooms
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Mineral Water
Mineral
Mineral
water is water from a mineral spring that contains various minerals, such as salts and sulfur compounds. Mineral
Mineral
water may be classified as "still" or "sparkling" (carbonated/effervescent) according to the presence or absence of added gases. Traditionally, mineral waters were used or consumed at their spring sources, often referred to as "taking the waters" or "taking the cure," at places such as spas, baths, or wells. The term spa was used for a place where the water was consumed and bathed in; bath where the water was used primarily for bathing, therapeutics, or recreation; and well where the water was to be consumed. Today, it is far more common for mineral water to be bottled at the source for distributed consumption. Travelling to the mineral water site for direct access to the water is now uncommon, and in many cases not possible because of exclusive commercial ownership rights
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Coca-Cola
Coca-Cola, or Coke, is a carbonated soft drink[1] produced by The Coca- Cola
Cola
Company. Originally intended as a patent medicine, it was invented in the late 19th century by John Pemberton
John Pemberton
and was bought out by businessman Asa Griggs Candler, whose marketing tactics led Coca- Cola
Cola
to its dominance of the world soft-drink market throughout the 20th century. The drink's name refers to two of its original ingredients, which were kola nuts (a source of caffeine) and coca leaves. The current formula of Coca- Cola
Cola
remains a trade secret, although a variety of reported recipes and experimental recreations have been published. The Coca-Cola Company
The Coca-Cola Company
produces concentrate, which is then sold to licensed Coca- Cola
Cola
bottlers throughout the world
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Countries Of The World
This list of sovereign states provides an overview of sovereign states around the world, with information on their status and recognition of their sovereignty. Membership within the United Nations
United Nations
system divides the 206 listed states into three categories: 193 member states,[1] 2 observer states, and 11 other states. The sovereignty dispute column indicates states whose sovereignty is undisputed (191 states) and states whose sovereignty is disputed (15 states, out of which there are 5 member states, 1 observer state and 9 other states). Compiling a list such as this can be a difficult and controversial process, as there is no definition that is binding on all the members of the community of nations concerning the criteria for statehood. For more information on the criteria used to determine the contents of this list, please see the criteria for inclusion section below
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Stock Breeding
Animal husbandry is the branch of agriculture concerned with animals that are raised for meat, fibre, milk, eggs, or other products. It includes day-to-day care, selective breeding and the raising of livestock. Husbandry has a long history, starting with the Neolithic revolution when animals were first domesticated, from around 13,000 BC onwards, antedating farming of the first crops
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Poultry
Poultry
Poultry
(/ˌpoʊltriː/) are domesticated birds kept by humans for their eggs, their meat or their feathers. These birds are most typically members of the superorder Galloanserae (fowl), especially the order Galliformes
Galliformes
(which includes chickens, quails and turkeys). Poultry
Poultry
also includes other birds that are killed for their meat, such as the young of pigeons (known as squabs) but does not include similar wild birds hunted for sport or food and known as game. The word "poultry" comes from the French/Norman word poule, itself derived from the Latin word pullus, which means small animal. The domestication of poultry took place several thousand years ago. This may have originally been as a result of people hatching and rearing young birds from eggs collected from the wild, but later involved keeping the birds permanently in captivity
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Medieval Bulgarian Royal Charters
The medieval Bulgarian royal charters are some of the few surviving secular documents of the Second Bulgarian Empire, and were issued by five tsars roughly between 1230 and 1380. The charters are written in Middle Bulgarian using the Early Cyrillic alphabet.Contents1 History and details 2 Importance 3 List 4 Footnotes 5 References 6 External linksHistory and details[edit] The two earliest Bulgarian royal charters, the Vatopedi Charter given to the Vatopedi monastery on Mount Athos, and the Dubrovnik Charter which permitted Ragusan merchants to trade all over the Bulgarian lands, were issued by Tsar Ivan Asen II of Bulgaria after 1230, and are both undated
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Ivan Alexander Of Bulgaria
Ivan Alexander (Bulgarian: Иван Александър, transliterated Ivan Aleksandǎr;[1] pronounced [iˈvan alɛkˈsandər]; original spelling: ІѠАНЪ АЛЄѮАНдРЪ),[2] also sometimes Anglicized as John Alexander,[3] ruled as Emperor (Tsar) of Bulgaria
Bulgaria
from 1331 to 1371,[4] during the Second Bulgarian Empire. The date of his birth is unknown. He died on 17 February 1371. The long reign of Ivan Alexander is considered a transitional period in Bulgarian medieval history
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Iskar River
The Iskar (Bulgarian: Искър pronounced [ˈiskɐr]; Latin: Oescus) is a right tributary of the Danube. With a length of 368 km it is the longest river that runs entirely within Bulgaria. Originating as three forks in Balkan's highest mountain range Rila, it flows in northern direction until its confluence with the Danube River. As it flows northwards it fuels the largest artificial lake in the country, the Iskar Reservoir, forms the divide between the Vitosha and Plana Mountains in the west and the Sredna Gora mountain range in the east before entering the Sofia Valley, which contains the nation's capital Sofia. From there the Iskar runs through the Balkan Mountains forming the spectacular 84 km long Iskar Gorge and as it crosses the mountains its water course turns in north-eastern direction at Lakatnik. North of the Balkan Mountains the river crosses the Danubian Plain and finally flows into the Danube between the villages of Baykal and Gigen
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Western Europe
Western Europe
Europe
is the region comprising the western part of Europe. Below, some different geographic, geopolitical and cultural definitions of the term are outlined. Significant historical events that have shaped the concept of Western Europe
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Belgrade
Belgrader (en) Beograđanin (sr)Time zone CET (UTC+1) • Summer (DST) CEST (UTC+2)Postal code 11000Area code(s) +381(0)11 ISO 3166 code RS-00Car plates BGWebsite www.beograd.rs Belgrade
Belgrade
(/ˈbɛlɡreɪd/ BEL-grayd; Serbian: Beograd / Београд, meaning "White city", Serbian pronunciation: [beǒɡrad] ( listen); names in other languages) is the capital and largest city of Serbia. It is located at the confluence of the Sava
Sava
and Danube
Danube
rivers, where the Pannonian Plain meets the Balkans.[6] The urban area of the City of Belgrade
Belgrade
has a population of 1.23 million, while nearly 1.7 million people live within its administrative limits.[5] One of the most important prehistoric cultures of Europe, the Vinča culture, evolved within the Belgrade
Belgrade
area in the 6th millennium BC
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