HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Kaaba
The Kaaba
Kaaba
(Arabic: ٱلْـكَـعْـبَـة‎ al-kaʿbah IPA: [alˈkaʕba], "The Cube"), also referred as al-Kaʿbah al-Musharrafah (Arabic: ٱلْـكَـعْـبَـة الْـمُـشَـرًّفَـة‎, the Holy Ka'bah), is a building at the center of Islam's most important mosque, that is Al-Masjid Al-Ḥarām (Arabic: ٱلْـمَـسْـجِـد الْـحَـرَام‎, The Sacred Mosque), in the Hejazi city of Mecca, Saudi Arabia.[1] It is the most sacred site in Islam.[2] It is considered by Muslims to be the Bayṫ Allāh (Arabic: بَـيْـت ٱلله‎, "House of God"), and has a similar role to the Tabernacle and Holy of Holies
Holy of Holies
in Judaism. Wherever they are in the world, Muslims are expected to face the Ka'bah when performing Ṣalâṫ (Arabic: صَـلَاة‎, Islamic prayer)
[...More...]

"Kaaba" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Prophet
In religion, a prophet is an individual who is regarded as being in contact by a divine being and is said to speak on that entity's behalf, serving as an intermediary with humanity by delivering messages or teachings from the supernatural source to other people.[1][2] The message that the prophet conveys is called a prophecy, which transports—at least in Judaism—a message beyond mere pagan soothsaying, augury, divination, or forecasting, and, most prominently in the neviim of the Tanakh, often comprises issues of social justice. Claims of prophethood have existed in many cultures through history, including Judaism, Christianity, Islam, in Ancient Greek Philosophy, Zoroastrianism, Manichaeism, and many others
[...More...]

"Prophet" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Granite
Granite
Granite
( /ˈɡrænɪt/) is a common type of felsic intrusive igneous rock that is granular and phaneritic in texture. Granites can be predominantly white, pink, or gray in color, depending on their mineralogy. The word "granite" comes from the Latin
Latin
granum, a grain, in reference to the coarse-grained structure of such a holocrystalline rock. Strictly speaking, granite is an igneous rock with between 20% and 60% quartz by volume, and at least 35% of the total feldspar consisting of alkali feldspar, although commonly the term "granite" is used to refer to a wider range of coarse grained igneous rocks containing quartz and feldspar. The term "granitic" means granite-like and is applied to granite and a group of intrusive igneous rocks with similar textures and slight variations in composition and origin
[...More...]

"Granite" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Iraq
Coordinates: 33°N 44°E / 33°N 44°E / 33; 44 Republic
Republic
of Iraqجمهورية العراق (Arabic) کۆماری عێراق (Kurdish)FlagCoat of armsMotto: الله أكبر (Arabic) "Allahu Akbar" (transliteration) "God is the Greatest"Anthem: "Mawtini" "موطني" (English: "My Homeland")Capital and largest city Baghdad 33°20′N 44°26′E / 33.333°N 44.433°E / 33.333; 44.433Official languagesArabic KurdishReligion IslamDemonym IraqiGovernment Federal parliamentary republic•&#
[...More...]

"Iraq" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Syria
Coordinates: 35°N 38°E / 35°N 38°E / 35; 38Syrian Arab
Arab
Republic الجمهورية العربية السورية (Arabic) al-Jumhūrīyah al-ʻArabīyah as-SūrīyahFlagCoat of armsAnthem: "حماة الديار" (Arabic) Humat ad-Diyar Guardians of the HomelandCapital and largest city Damascus 33°30′N 36°18′E / 33.500°N 36.300°E / 33.500; 36.300Official languages ArabicEthnic groupsSyrian Arabs Arameans Kurds Turkomans Assyrians Circassians ArmeniansReligion 87% Islam 10% Christianity 3% Dr
[...More...]

"Syria" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Yemen
Coordinates: 15°N 48°E / 15°N 48°E / 15; 48Republic of Yemen اَلْـجُـمْـهُـوْرِيَّـة الْـيَـمَـنِـيَّـة (Arabic) al-Jumhūrīyah al-YamanīyahFlagEmblemMotto:  الله، اَلْـوَطَـن، اَلـثَّـوْرَة، اَلْـوَحْـدَة (Arabic) "Allāh, al-Waṭan, ath-Thawrah, al-Waḥdah" "God, Country, Revolution, Unity"Anthem: اَلْـجُـمْـهُـوْرِيَّـة الْـمُـتَّـحِـدَة (Arabic) al-Jumhūrīyah al-Muttaḥidah (English: "United Republic")Location of  Yemen  (red)Capital and largest city Sana'aOfficial languages ArabicReligion IslamDemonym Yemeni, YemeniteGovernment Provisional government• President
[...More...]

"Yemen" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Dua
In the terminology of Islam, duʿāʾ (Arabic: دُعَاء‎  IPA: [duˈʕæːʔ], plural: ʾadʿiyah أدْعِيَة  [ʔædˈʕijæ]; archaically transliterated Doowa[1]), literally meaning "invocation", is an act of supplication. The term is derived from an Arabic
Arabic
word meaning to 'call out' or to 'summon', and Muslims regard this as a profound act of worship
[...More...]

"Dua" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Winter Solstice
The winter solstice (or hibernal solstice), also known as midwinter, is an astronomical phenomenon marking the day with the shortest period of daylight and the longest night of the year. In the Northern Hemisphere this is the December solstice
December solstice
and in the Southern Hemisphere this is the June solstice. The axial tilt of Earth and gyroscopic effects of its daily rotation mean that the two opposite points in the sky to which the Earth's axis of rotation points (axial precession) change very slowly (at the current rate it would take just under 26,000 years to make a complete circle). As the Earth follows its orbit around the Sun, the polar hemisphere that faced away from the Sun, experiencing winter, will, in half a year, face towards the Sun and experience summer
[...More...]

"Winter Solstice" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Summer Solstice
The summer solstice (or estival solstice), also known as midsummer, occurs when a planet's rotational axis, or geographical pole on either its northern or its Southern Hemisphere, is most inclined toward the star that it orbits. On the summer solstice, Earth's maximum axial tilt toward the Sun
Sun
is 23.44°. (Likewise, the Sun's declination from the celestial equator is +23.44° in the Northern Celestial Hemisphere and −23.44° in the Southern Celestial Hemisphere.) This happens twice each year (once in each hemisphere), when the Sun
Sun
reaches its highest position in the sky as seen from the North or South Pole. The summer solstice occurs during the hemisphere's summer.[2] This is the June solstice in the Northern Hemisphere
Northern Hemisphere
and the December solstice in the Southern Hemisphere
[...More...]

"Summer Solstice" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Compass
A compass is an instrument used for navigation and orientation that shows direction relative to the geographic cardinal directions (or points). Usually, a diagram called a compass rose shows the directions north, south, east, and west on the compass face as abbreviated initials. When the compass is used, the rose can be aligned with the corresponding geographic directions; for example, the "N" mark on the rose points northward. Compasses often display markings for angles in degrees in addition to (or sometimes instead of) the rose. North corresponds to 0°, and the angles increase clockwise, so east is 90° degrees, south is 180°, and west is 270°. These numbers allow the compass to show azimuths or bearings, which are commonly stated in this notation. Among the Four Great Inventions, the magnetic compass was first invented as a device for divination as early as the Chinese Han Dynasty (since c
[...More...]

"Compass" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cardinal Direction
The four cardinal directions or cardinal points are the directions north, east, south, and west, commonly denoted by their initials N, E, S, and W. East
East
and west are at right angles to north and south, with east being in the clockwise direction of rotation from north and west being directly opposite east. Points between the cardinal directions form the points of the compass. The intermediate (intercardinal or ordinal) directions are northeast (NE), southeast (SE), southwest (SW), and northwest (NW)
[...More...]

"Cardinal Direction" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Teak
Teak
Teak
( Tectona
Tectona
grandis) is a tropical hardwood tree species placed in the flowering plant family Lamiaceae. Tectona
Tectona
grandis is a large, deciduous tree that occurs in mixed hardwood forests. It has small, fragrant white flowers and large papery leaves that are often hairy on the lower surface. It is sometimes known as the "Burmese teak". Teak wood has a leather-like smell when it is freshly milled
[...More...]

"Teak" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Stainless Steel
In metallurgy, stainless steel, also known as inox steel or inox from French inoxydable (inoxidizable), is a steel alloy with a minimum of 10.5% chromium content by mass.[1] Stainless steels are notable for their corrosion resistance, which increases with increasing chromium content. Molybdenum
Molybdenum
additions increase corrosion resistance in reducing acids and against pitting attack in chloride solutions. Thus, there are numerous grades of stainless steel with varying chromium and molybdenum contents to suit the environment the alloy must endure. Thus stainless steels are used where both the strength of steel and corrosion resistance are required. Stainless steel’s resistance to corrosion and staining, low maintenance, and familiar lustre make it an ideal material for many applications
[...More...]

"Stainless Steel" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Censer
A censer, incense burner or perfume burner (these may be hyphenated) is a vessel made for burning incense or perfume in some solid form. These vessels vary greatly in size, form, and material of construction, and have been in use since ancient times in many cultures, in both secular and religious contexts. They may consist of simple earthenware bowls or fire pots to intricately carved silver or gold vessels, small table top objects a few centimetres tall to as many as several metres high. Many designs use openwork to allow a flow of air
[...More...]

"Censer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Oil Lamp
An oil lamp is an object used to produce light continuously for a period of time using an oil-based fuel source. The use of oil lamps began thousands of years ago and continues to this day, although not commonly anymore. They are often associated with stories in which rubbing an oil lamp would summon a genie dwelling in it. Oil lamps are a form of lighting, and were used as an alternative to candles before the use of electric lights. Starting in 1780, the Argand lamp
Argand lamp
quickly replaced other oil lamps still in their basic ancient form. These in turn were replaced by the kerosene lamp in about 1850. In small towns and rural areas the latter continued in use well into the 20th century, until such areas were finally electrified and light bulbs could be used. Sources of fuel for oil lamps include a wide variety of plants such as nuts (walnuts, almonds) and seeds (sesame, olive, castor, flax)
[...More...]

"Oil Lamp" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Limestone
Limestone
Limestone
is a sedimentary rock, composed mainly of skeletal fragments of marine organisms such as coral, forams and molluscs. Its major materials are the minerals calcite and aragonite, which are different crystal forms of calcium carbonate (CaCO3). About 10% of sedimentary rocks are limestones. The solubility of limestone in water and weak acid solutions leads to karst landscapes, in which water erodes the limestone over thousands to millions of years
[...More...]

"Limestone" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.