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Jenny Uglow
Jennifer Sheila Uglow OBE
OBE
(née Crowther,[1][2] born 1947) is a British biographer, historian, critic and publisher. She was an editorial director of Chatto & Windus. She has written critically acclaimed biographies of Elizabeth Gaskell, William Hogarth, Thomas Bewick, Edward Lear
Edward Lear
and the Lunar Society, among others, and has also compiled a women's biographical dictionary. She won the 2002 James Tait Black Memorial Prize and the 2003 Hessell-Tiltman Prize
Hessell-Tiltman Prize
for The Lunar Men: The Friends who Made the Future 1730–1810, and her works have twice been shortlisted for the Whitbread Prize
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OBE
The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire
British Empire
is a British order of chivalry, rewarding contributions to the arts and sciences, work with charitable and welfare organisations, and public service outside the Civil service.[2] It was established on 4 June 1917 by King George V, and comprises five classes across both civil and military divisions, the most senior two of which make the recipient either a knight if male or dame if female.[3] There is also the related British Empire Medal, whose recipients are affiliated with, but not members of, the order. Recommendations for appointments to the Order of the British Empire were at first made on the nomination of the United Kingdom, the self-governing Dominions
Dominions
of the Empire (later Commonwealth) and the Viceroy of India
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Royal Horticultural Society
The Royal Horticultural Society
Royal Horticultural Society
(RHS), founded in 1804 as the Horticultural Society of London,[1][2] is the UK's leading gardening charity.[3][4][1] The RHS promotes horticulture through flower shows including the Chelsea Flower Show, Hampton Court Palace Flower Show, Tatton Park Flower Show and Cardiff Flower Show
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Joseph Priestley
Joseph Priestley
Joseph Priestley
FRS (/ˈpriːstli/;[2] 24 March [O.S. 13 March] 1733 – 6 February 1804) was an 18th-century English Separatist theologian, natural philosopher, chemist, innovative grammarian, multi-subject educator, and liberal political theorist who published over 150 works. He has historically been credited with the discovery of oxygen,[3] having isolated it in its gaseous state, although Carl Wilhelm Scheele
Carl Wilhelm Scheele
and Antoine Lavoisier
Antoine Lavoisier
also have strong claims to the discovery.[4] During his lifetime, Priestley's considerable scientific reputation rested on his invention of soda water, his writings on electricity, and his discovery of several "airs" (gases), the most famous being what Priestley dubbed "dephlogisticated air" (oxygen)
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A. S. Byatt
Dame Antonia Susan Duffy DBE HonFBA (née Drabble; born 24 August 1936), known professionally as A. S. Byatt
A. S. Byatt
(/ˈbaɪ.ət/ BY-ət),[1] is an English novelist, poet and Booker Prize
Booker Prize
winner. In 2008, The Times newspaper named her on its list of the 50 greatest British writers since 1945.[2]Contents1 Biography 2 Writing career 3 Memberships 4 Prizes and awards 5 Works5.1 Fiction 5.2 Short story collections 5.3 Essays and biographies 5.4 Texts edited6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksBiography[edit] Byatt was born in Sheffield
Sheffield
as Antonia Susan Drabble, the eldest child of John Drabble, QC, and Kathleen Bloor, a scholar of Browning.[3] Her sisters are the novelist Margaret Drabble
Margaret Drabble
and the art historian Helen Langdon
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The Observer
The Observer is a British newspaper published on Sundays. In the same place on the political spectrum as its sister papers The Guardian
The Guardian
and The Guardian
The Guardian
Weekly, whose parent company Guardian Media Group Limited acquired it in 1993, it takes a social liberal or social democratic line on most issues. First published in 1791, it is the world's oldest Sunday newspaper.[4]Contents1 History1.1 Origins 1.2 Nineteenth century 1.3 Twentieth century 1.4 Twenty-first century2 Supplements and features 3 The Newsroom 4 Bans 5 Editors 6 Photographers 7 Awards 8 Conventions sponsored 9 Bibliography 10 See also 11 References 12 External linksHistory[edit] Origins[edit] The first issue, published on 4 December 1791 by W.S. Bourne, was the world's first Sunday newspaper. Believing that the paper would be a means of wealth, Bourne instead soon found himself facing debts of nearly £1,600
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Peter Ackroyd
Peter Ackroyd, CBE, FRSL (born 5 October 1949) is an English biographer, novelist and critic with a particular interest in the history and culture of London. For his novels about English history and culture and his biographies of, among others, William Blake, Charles Dickens, T. S. Eliot
T. S. Eliot
and Sir Thomas More, he won the Somerset Maugham Award and two Whitbread Awards
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Frances Spalding
Frances Spalding CBE, FRSL
FRSL
(née Crabtree, born 16 July 1950[1]) is a British art
British art
historian and writer and the former Editor of The Burlington Magazine.Contents1 Life 2 Bibliography 3 References 4 External linksLife[edit] Frances Crabtree studied at Nottingham University
Nottingham University
and gained her PhD for a study of Roger Fry. She taught art history at Sheffield City Polytechnic before becoming a freelance writer and curator. She returned to academic work to take up the post of Professor of Art History at Newcastle University. In 1974, Frances Crabtree married Julian Spalding. Spalding specializes in 20th-century British art, biography and cultural history and her work includes 15 major books, essays, criticism and reviews
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The New York Times
The New York Times
The New York Times
(sometimes abbreviated as The NYT or The Times) is an American newspaper based in New York City
New York City
with worldwide influence and readership.[6][7][8] Founded in 1851, the paper has won 122 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other newspaper.[9][10] As of September 2016, it had the largest combined print-and-digital circulation of any daily newspaper in the United States.[11] The New York Times is ranked 18th in the world by circulation. The paper is owned by The New York Times
The New York Times
Company, which is publicly traded but primarily controlled by the Ochs-Sulzberger family through a dual-class share structure.[12] It has been owned by the family since 1896; A.G
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Michael Kimmelman
Michael Kimmelman
Michael Kimmelman
(born May 8, 1958)[1]) is an American author, critic, columnist and pianist. He is the architecture critic for The New York Times and has written about public housing, public space, climate change, community development, infrastructure, urban design, landscape design and social responsibility. In March, 2014, he was awarded the Brendan Gill Prize for his "insightful candor and continuous scrutiny of New York's architectural environment" that is "journalism at its finest."[2]Contents1 Life and career 2 Books 3 References 4 External linksLife and career[edit] Kimmelman was born and raised in Greenwich Village, the son of a physician and a sculptor, both civil rights activists
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Helen Macdonald (author)
Helen Macdonald, born in 1970, is an English writer, naturalist, and an Affiliated Research Scholar at the University of Cambridge Department of History and Philosophy of Science.[1][2] She is best known as the author of H is for Hawk, which won the 2014 Samuel Johnson Prize[3] and Costa Book Award.[4] In 2016, it also won the Prix du Meilleur Livre Étranger in France.Contents1 Biography 2 Works 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] Helen Macdonald was educated at Cambridge University.[5] She was a Research Fellow at Jesus College, Cambridge from 2004 to 2007.[6] She is an Affiliated Research Scholar at the Department of History and Philosophy of Science, University of Cambridge.[1] Macdonald has written and narrated radio programmes, and appeared in the BBC Four documentary series, Birds Britannia, in 2010.[2] Her books include Shaler's Fish (2001), Falcon (2006), and H is for Hawk (2014). Macdonald won the 2014 Samuel Johnson Prize for non-fiction for H i
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The Times Literary Supplement
The Times
The Times
Literary Supplement (or TLS, on the front page from 1969) is a weekly literary review published in London
London
by News UK, a subsidiary of News Corp.Contents1 History 2 In literature 3 Editors 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksHistory[edit] The TLS first appeared in 1902 as a supplement to The Times, but became a separate publication in 1914. Many distinguished writers have been contributors, including T. S. Eliot, Henry James, and Virginia Woolf, but reviews were normally anonymous until 1974. From 1974, signed reviews were gradually introduced during the editorship of John Gross. This aroused great controversy at the time. "Anonymity had once been appropriate when it was a general rule at other publications, but it had ceased to be so,” Gross said
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Beer Street And Gin Lane
Beer
Beer
Street and Gin
Gin
Lane are two prints issued in 1751 by English artist William Hogarth
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The Sunday Times
The Sunday Times
The Sunday Times
is the largest-selling British national newspaper in the "quality press" market category. It is published by Times Newspapers Ltd, a subsidiary of News UK, which is in turn owned by News Corp. Times Newspapers also publishes The Times. The two papers were founded independently and have been under common ownership only since 1966. They were bought by News International in 1981. The Sunday Times
The Sunday Times
occupies a dominant position in the quality Sunday market; its circulation of just under one million equals that of its main rivals, The Sunday Telegraph and The Observer, combined.[5] While some other national newspapers moved to a tabloid format in the early 2000s, The Sunday Times
The Sunday Times
has retained the larger broadsheet format and has said that it will continue to do so
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The Guardian
The Guardian
The Guardian
is a British daily newspaper. It was known from 1821 until 1959 as the Manchester
Manchester
Guardian. Along with its sister papers The Observer and the Guardian Weekly, The Guardian
The Guardian
is part of the Guardian Media Group, owned by the Scott Trust
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The New York Review Of Books
The New York Review of Books
The New York Review of Books
(or NYREV or NYRB) is a semi-monthly magazine[2] with articles on literature, culture, economics, science and current affairs. Published in New York City, it is inspired by the idea that the discussion of important books is an indispensable literary activity. Esquire called it "the premier literary-intellectual magazine in the English language."[3] In 1970 writer Tom Wolfe
Tom Wolfe
described it as "the chief theoretical organ of Radical Chic".[4] The Review publishes long-form reviews and essays, often by well-known writers, original poetry, and has letters and personals advertising sections that had attracted critical comment. In 1979 the magazine founded the London Review of Books, which soon became independent. In 1990 it founded an Italian edition, la Rivista dei Libri, published until 2010. Robert B. Silvers
Robert B

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