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Ivan Merz
Blessed Ivan Merz
Ivan Merz
(December 16, 1896 in Banja Luka
Banja Luka
– May 10, 1928 in Zagreb) was a Croatian lay academic, beatified by Pope
Pope
John Paul II
John Paul II
on a visit at Banja Luka, Bosnia and Herzegovina
Bosnia and Herzegovina
on June 22, 2003
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Jerome
Catholicism portal Philosophy
Philosophy
portalv t e Jerome
Jerome
(/dʒəˈroʊm/; Latin: Eusebius
Eusebius
Sophronius Hieronymus; Greek: Εὐσέβιος Σωφρόνιος Ἱερώνυμος; c. 27 March 347 – 30 September 420) was a priest, confessor, theologian, and historian. He was born at Stridon, a village near Emona
Emona
on the border of Dalmatia and Pannonia.[2][3][4] He is best known for his translation of most of the Bible
Bible
into Latin
Latin
(the translation that became known as the Vulgate), and his commentaries on the Gospels. His list of writings is extensive.[5] The protégé of Pope
Pope
Damasus I, who died in December of 384, Jerome was known for his teachings on Christian moral life, especially to those living in cosmopolitan centers such as Rome
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Saint Silvan
Saint
Saint
Silvan was a Christian martyr and a saint who lived in the fourth century. Not much is known about this Saint
Saint
other than he was martyred between 300 A.D - 350 A.D. and his apparently incorrupt body is still on display 17 centuries after his death. It appears that Silvan was very young when he was martyred, showing his devoutness to Christianity from a young age. In his tomb, an embroidered cross on the front of his garment indicating that he may have been a priest or some other cleric possibly indicating that he was a fairly high ranking in his time. The incorrupt body of Saint
Saint
Silvan is located in the Church of Saint Blaise in Dubrovnik, Croatia. A number of Silvans have been canonized as saints, and it is unclear which Saint
Saint
Silvan is entombed at the Church of Saint
Saint
Blaise
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Pius XI
Pope
Pope
Pius XI, (Italian: Pio XI) born Ambrogio Damiano Achille Ratti[a] (Italian: [amˈbrɔ:dʒo daˈmja:no aˈkille ˈratti]; 31 May 1857 – 10 February 1939), was head of the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
from 6 February 1922 to his death in 1939. He was the first sovereign of Vatican City
Vatican City
from its creation as an independent state on 11 February 1929. He took as his papal motto, "Pax Christi in Regno Christi," translated "The Peace of Christ in the Kingdom of Christ." Pius XI issued numerous encyclicals, including Quadragesimo anno on the 40th anniversary of Pope
Pope
Leo XIII's groundbreaking social encyclical Rerum novarum, highlighting the capitalistic greed of international finance, the dangers of socialism/communism, and social justice issues, and Quas primas, establishing the feast of Christ the King in response to anti-clericalism
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Catholic Church
The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with more than 1.29 billion members worldwide.[4] As one of the oldest religious institutions in the world, it has played a prominent role in the history and development of Western civilisation.[5] Headed by the Bishop of Rome, known as the Pope, the church's doctrines are summarised in the Nicene Creed
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Pope
The pope (Latin: papa from Greek: πάππας pappas,[1] a child's word for "father"),[2] also known as the supreme pontiff (from Latin pontifex maximus "greatest bridge-builder"), is the Bishop
Bishop
of Rome, and therefore ex officio the leader of the worldwide Catholic Church.[3] The primacy of the Roman bishop is largely derived from his role as the supposed apostolic successor to Saint Peter, to whom Jesus is said to have given the Keys of Heaven
Keys of Heaven
and the powers of "binding and loosing", naming him as the "rock" upon which the church would be built. The pope is also head of state of Vatican City,[4] a sovereign city-state entirely enclaved within Rome. The current pope is Francis, who was elected on 13 March 2013, succeeding Benedict XVI.[5] The office of the pope is the papacy
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Holy Communion
The Eucharist
Eucharist
(/ˈjuːkərɪst/; also called Holy Communion or the Lord's Supper, among other names) is a Christian
Christian
rite that is considered a sacrament in most churches and an ordinance in others. According to the New Testament, the rite was instituted by Jesus Christ
Christ
during his Last Supper; giving his disciples bread and wine during the Passover
Passover
meal, Jesus
Jesus
commanded his followers to "do this in memory of me" while referring to the bread as "my body" and the wine as "my blood".[1][2] Through the Eucharistic celebration Christians remember both Christ's sacrifice of himself on the cross and his commission of the apostles at the Last Supper.[3] The elements of the Eucharist, bread (leavened or unleavened) and wine (or grape juice), are consecrated on an altar (or table) and consumed thereafter
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Austria-Hungary
Austria-Hungary, often referred to as the Austro-Hungarian Empire
Empire
or the Dual Monarchy
Dual Monarchy
in English-language sources, was a constitutional union of the Austrian Empire
Austrian Empire
(the Kingdoms and Lands Represented in the Imperial Council, or Cisleithania) and the Kingdom of Hungary ( Lands of the Crown of Saint Stephen
Lands of the Crown of Saint Stephen
or Transleithania) that existed from 1867 to 1918, when it collapsed as a result of defeat in World War I. The union was a result of the Austro-Hungarian Compromise of 1867 and came into existence on 30 March 1867
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Pier Giorgio Frassati
Blessed Pier Giorgio Frassati
Pier Giorgio Frassati
(6 April 1901 – 4 July 1925) was an Italian Roman Catholic social activist and a member from the Third Order of Saint Dominic.[2] Frassati was dedicated to social justice issues and joined several charitable organizations to better aid the poor and less fortunate living in his hometown of Turin; he put his own pious beliefs into practice to cater to their needs and was best known for his devotedness and his amiable character.[3][4] Frassati was an avid mountaineer who often climbed with his friends; he was an able swimmer and athlete best known for engaging in such social activities with a range of like-minded friends.[5] His charitable outreach towards others knew no bounds for he identified with and aided the poor and ill from his childhood
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Maurus Of Parentium
Saint
Saint
Maurus of Parentium
Maurus of Parentium
is the patron saint of the Croatian city of Poreč, called Parentium in Roman times. The Church has existed in Istria
Istria
since the times of the early Christian martyrs. St. Maurus (sv. Mavro) was the first bishop of Poreč
Poreč
and the Istrian diocese who suffered a martyred death in the late 3rd century. A basilica was built in Poreč
Poreč
in the 5th century called Euphrasian Basilica
Basilica
where the relics of Saint
Saint
Maurus, now the patron saint of the city, are kept in the votive chapel called a martyrium. He is shown on the mosaic of the basilica with a martyr's crown in his hand.This article about a saint is a stub
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Pope Caius
Pope
Pope
Caius (died 22 April 296), also called Gaius, was the Bishop
Bishop
of Rome
Rome
from 17 December 283 to his death in 296.[1] Christian tradition makes him a native of the Dalmatian city of Salona, today Solin near Split, the son of a man also named Caius, and a member of a noble family related to the Emperor Diocletian.[2] He was Illyrian.[3] Little information on Caius is available except that given by the Liber Pontificalis, which relies on a legendary account of the martyrdom of St. Susanna
St. Susanna
for its information. According to legend, Caius baptized the men and women who had been converted by Saint Tiburtius (who is venerated with St
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Alberto Marvelli
Alberto Marvelli
Alberto Marvelli
(21 March 1918 – 5 October 1946) was an Italian Roman Catholic and a member from the Catholic Action movement.[1] He became noted for his defense of the poor and for selflessness during World War II
World War II
in tending to the homeless and wounded despite the devastating air raids while placing himself at risk in doing so. Marvelli also saved numerous people from deportation since he would free them from sealed train carriages before the train would set off.[2][3] Marvelli likewise was an active champion for social justice and was known for providing his own possessions to the poor and homeless more so during the harsh winter periods
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Saint Marinus
Roman Catholic Church Eastern Orthodox Church[1]Major shrine Basilica of Saint MarinusFeast September 3Attributes Depicted as a bearded layman with a stonemason's hammer; also depicted as a young deacon with a hammer; depicted serving as a deacon to Saint Leo the Great or Gaudentius of Rimini; two oxen near him.Patronage San Marino Saint Marinus
Saint Marinus
was the founder of a chapel and monastery, in 301. From this initial community the state of San Marino
San Marino
later grew. Tradition holds that he was a stonemason by trade who came from the island of Rab, on the other side of the Adriatic Sea
Adriatic Sea
(in what is now part of modern Croatia, but then part of the Roman Empire), fleeing persecution for his Christian beliefs in the Diocletianic Persecution. Still known only by the single name Marinus (lit
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Quirinus Of Sescia
In Roman mythology
Roman mythology
and religion, Quirinus
Quirinus
(/kwɪˈraɪnəs/;[2] Latin: Quirīnus, [kʷɪˈriːnʊs]) is an early god of the Roman state. In Augustan Rome, Quirinus
Quirinus
was also an epithet of Janus, as Janus Quirinus.[3] His name may be derived from the Sabine word quiris "spear".Contents1 Etymology 2 History 3 Depiction 4 Festivals 5 Legacy 6 See also 7 Notes 8 ReferencesEtymology[edit] Quirinus
Quirinus
is probably an adjective meaning "wielder of the spear" (Quiris, in the Sabine language, cf. Janus
Janus
Quirinus). Other suggested etymologies are: (i) from the Sabine town Cures; (2) from curia, i.e. he was the god of the Roman state as represented by the thirty curies, first proposed by Krestchmer. A. B. Cook (Class. Rev
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Donatus Of Zadar
Saint Donatus (second half of 8th century Zadar
Zadar
– first half of 9th century), also called Donato of Zara, was a Dalmatian saint who became a bishop and a diplomat for the Dalmatian city-state of Zadar
Zadar
(Zara). His feast day is celebrated on February 25. Donatus is mentioned in Frankish annals from 805 as an ambassador of the Dalmatian cities to Charlemagne
Charlemagne
in Thionville. Donatus is credited for initiating either construction or expansion of the Church of the Holy Trinity. The church was completed in the beginning of the 9th century and in the 15th century. Its name was later changed by the Venetians to the Church of St
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Saint Domnius
Saint Domnius (also known as Saint Dujam or Saint Duje, Saint Domnio, Saint Doimus, or Saint Domninus) was a 3rd-century Bishop of Salona and patron of the city of Split. Salona
Salona
was a large Roman city serving as capital of the Province of Dalmatia. Today it is located near the city of Split in modern Croatia. Saint Domnius was martyred with seven other Christians in the persecutions of the Emperor Diocletian
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