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Island
An island or isle is any piece of sub-continental land that is surrounded by water.[2] Very small islands such as emergent land features on atolls can be called islets, skerries, cays or keys. An island in a river or a lake island may be called an eyot or ait, and a small island off the coast may be called a holm. A grouping of geographically or geologically related islands is called an archipelago, such as the Philippines, for example. An island may be described as such, despite the presence of an artificial land bridge; examples are Singapore
Singapore
and its causeway, and the various Dutch delta islands, such as IJsselmonde. Some places may even retain "island" in their names for historical reasons after being connected to a larger landmass by a land bridge or landfill, such as Coney Island
Coney Island
and Coronado Island, though these are, strictly speaking, tied islands
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Middle English
Middle English
Middle English
(ME) is collectively the varieties of the English language spoken after the Norman Conquest
Norman Conquest
(1066) until the late 15th century; scholarly opinion varies but the Oxford English Dictionary specifies the period of 1150 to 1500.[2] This stage of the development of the English language
English language
roughly followed the High to the Late Middle Ages. Middle English
Middle English
developed out of Late Old English, seeing many dramatic changes in its grammar, pronunciation and orthography. Writing customs during Middle English
Middle English
times varied widely, but by the end of the period, about 1470, aided by the invention of the printing press, a standard based on the London
London
dialect (Chancery Standard) had become established
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Old English
Old English
Old English
(Ænglisc, Anglisc, Englisc), or Anglo-Saxon,[2] is the earliest historical form of the English language, spoken in England and southern and eastern Scotland
Scotland
in the early Middle Ages. It was brought to Great Britain
Great Britain
by Anglo-Saxon settlers probably in the mid-5th century, and the first Old English
Old English
literary works date from the mid-7th century. After the Norman conquest
Norman conquest
of 1066, English was replaced, for a time, as the language of the upper classes by Anglo-Norman, a relative of French
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Cognate
In linguistics, cognates are words that have a common etymological origin.[1] For example, the English word dish and the German word Tisch ("table"), are cognates because they both come from Latin discus, which relates to their flat surfaces. Cognates may have evolved similar, different or even opposite meanings. But, in most cases, there are some similar letters in the word. Some words sound similar, but don't come from the same root. These are called false cognates and are described in more detail below. In etymology, the cognate category excludes doublets and loanwords. The word cognate derives from the Latin
Latin
noun cognatus, which means "blood relative".[2]Contents1 Characteristics 2 Across languages 3 Within the same language 4 False cognates 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksCharacteristics[edit] Cognates do not need to have the same meaning, which may have changed as the languages developed separately
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False Etymology
A false etymology (popular etymology, etymythology,[1] pseudo-etymology, or par(a)etymology), sometimes called folk etymology – although the latter is also a technical term in linguistics - is a popularly held but false belief about the origin or derivation of a specific word. Such etymologies often have the feel of urban legends, and can be much more colorful and fanciful than the typical etymologies found in dictionaries, often involving stories of unusual practices in particular subcultures (e.g
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Etymology
Etymology
Etymology
(/ˌɛtɪˈmɒlədʒi/)[1] is the study of the history of words, their origins, and how their form and meaning have changed over time.[1] By extension, the term "the etymology (of a word)" means the origin of the particular word. For a language such as Greek with a long written history, etymologists make use of texts in these languages and texts about the languages to gather knowledge about how words were used during earlier periods of their history and when they entered the languages in question. Etymologists also apply the methods of comparative linguistics to reconstruct information about languages that are too old for any direct information to be available. By analyzing related languages with a technique known as the comparative method, linguists can make inferences about their shared parent language and its vocabulary
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Cross Cave
Cross Cave (Slovene: Križna jama), also named Cold Cave under Cross Mountain (Mrzla jama pod Križno goro), is a cave located in the Lož Valley, Slovenia. The cave is named after nearby Holy Cross Church in Podlož.[2] The cave is particularly noted for its chain of over 45 subterranean lakes of emerald green water. With 45 species of organisms, some not discovered until 2000, Cross Cave is the fourth-largest cave ecosystem in the world by biodiversity.[3] The cave was first documented in 1832, but the part of the cave which includes lakes and stream passages was first explored by Slovene cavers in 1926. Over two thousand bones of the cave bear have been found in the cave.[3] Course[edit] At Calvary (Kalvarija; the best known symbol of Cross Cave), the cave splits into two branches - the Muds (Blata) to the north and the Variegated Passage (Pisani rov) to the north-east
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Lower Saranac Lake
Saranac may refer to a place name in the United States:Saranac, Michigan, a villageNew YorkSaranac, New York, a town in Clinton County Saranac Lake, New York, a large village in Franklin and Essex counties Upper Saranac Lake Middle Saranac Lake Lower Saranac Lake The
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Liaoning Province
Liaoning
Liaoning
(Chinese: 辽宁; pinyin:  Liáoníng ) is a province of China, located in the northeast of the country. The modern province was established in 1907 as Fengtian or Fengtien province and the name was changed to Liaoning
Liaoning
in 1929. It was also known as Mukden province at the time, for the Manchu
Manchu
pronunciation of Shengjing, the former name of the provincial capital Shenyang
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Corinth Canal
The Corinth
Corinth
Canal
Canal
(Greek: Διώρυγα της Κορίνθου, Dhioryga tis Korinthou) is a canal that connects the Gulf of Corinth with the Saronic Gulf
Saronic Gulf
in the Aegean Sea. It cuts through the narrow Isthmus of Corinth
Isthmus of Corinth
and separates the Peloponnese
Peloponnese
from the Greek mainland, arguably making the peninsula an island. The builders dug the canal through the Isthmus at sea level; no locks are employed. It is 6.4 kilometres (4 mi) in length and only 21.4 metres (70 ft) wide at its base, making it impassable for most modern ships. It now has little economic importance. The canal was initially proposed in classical times and a failed effort was made to build it in the 1st century CE.[2] Construction started in 1881 but was hampered by geological and financial problems that bankrupted the original builders
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Water
Water
Water
is a transparent, tasteless, odorless, and nearly colorless chemical substance that is the main constituent of Earth's streams, lakes, and oceans, and the fluids of most living organisms. Its chemical formula is H2O, meaning that each of its molecules contains one oxygen and two hydrogen atoms that are connected by covalent bonds. Strictly speaking, water refers to the liquid state of a substance that prevails at standard ambient temperature and pressure; but it often refers also to its solid state (ice) or its gaseous state (steam or water vapor). It also occurs in nature as snow, glaciers, ice packs and icebergs, clouds, fog, dew, aquifers, and atmospheric humidity. Water
Water
covers 71% of the Earth's surface.[1] It is vital for all known forms of life
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German Language
No official regulation ( German orthography
German orthography
regulated by the Council for German Orthography[4]). Language
Language
codesISO 639-1 deISO 639-2 ger (B) deu (T)ISO 639-3 Variously: deu – German gmh&#
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United States Ship Canal
Coordinates: 40°52′30″N 73°55′5″W / 40.87500°N 73.91806°W / 40.87500; -73.91806The mouth of the Spuyten Duyvil Creek
Spuyten Duyvil Creek
with the Henry Hudson Bridge
Henry Hudson Bridge
and the Spuyten Duyvil BridgeOriginal
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Johor–Singapore Causeway
The Johor– Singapore
Singapore
Causeway
Causeway
(Chinese: 新柔长堤, Malay: Tambak Johor) is a 1,056-metre causeway that links the city of Johor Bahru
Johor Bahru
in Malaysia
Malaysia
across the Straits of Johor
Straits of Johor
to the town of Woodlands in Singapore. It serves as a road and rail link, as well as water piping into Singapore.Contents1 History 2 Attempts to have the Causeway
Causeway
replaced 3 Road charges 4 Public transport services4.1 Train Services (KTM) 4.2 Public Bus Services5 See also 6 References6.1 Others7 External linksHistory[edit]The severed causeway on the eve of Japanese invasion in 1942.From the 19th century, Malaya’s commodities such as tin, rubber, pepper and gambier were largely shipped through the port at Singapore, a British colony
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Fernando De Noronha
Fernando de Noronha
Fernando de Noronha
(Portuguese pronunciation: [feʁˈnɐ̃du d(ʒ)i noˈɾoɲɐ]) is an archipelago of 21 islands and islets in the Atlantic Ocean, 354 km (220 mi) offshore from the Brazilian coast. The archipelago's name is a corruption of the name of the Portuguese merchant Fernão de Loronha, to whom it was given by the Portuguese crown for services rendered regarding wood imported from Brazil
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Ait
An ait (pronounced /eɪt/, like "eight") or eyot (pronounced /aɪət/, /aɪt/, or /eɪt/) is a small island.[1] It is especially used to refer to river islands found on the River Thames
River Thames
and its tributaries in England.[2] Aits are typically formed by the deposit of sediment in the water, which accumulates over a period of time. An ait is characteristically long and narrow, and may become a permanent island. However, aits may also be eroded: the resulting sediment is deposited further downstream and could result in another ait. A channel with numerous aits is called a braided channel. References in literature[edit] Although not common in 21st-century English, "ait" or "eyot" appears in J. R. R. Tolkien's Lord of the Rings, Charles Dickens' Bleak House, and Thackeray's Vanity Fair.[3] Joyce Cary
Joyce Cary
used "eyot" in The Horse's Mouth
The Horse's Mouth
– "Sun was in the bank. Streak of salmon below
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