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Irish Travellers
Irish Travellers
Irish Travellers
(Irish: an lucht siúil, meaning 'the walking people') are a traditionally itinerant ethnic group who maintain a set of traditions.[2][3] Although predominantly English-speaking, some also use Shelta and other similar cants. They live mostly in Ireland as well as comprising large communities in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and the United States.[4] Their origin is disputed
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London Borough Of Brent
18% White British 4% White Irish 0.1% White Gypsy or Irish Traveller 14.3% Other White 1.4% White & Black Caribbean 0.9% White & Black African 1.2% White & Asian 1.6% Other Mixed 18.6% Indian 4.6% Pakistani 0.6% Bangladeshi 1% Chinese 9.2% Other Asian 7.8% Black African 7.6% Black Caribbean 3.4% Other Black 3.7% Arab 2.1% OtherTime zone GMT (UTC) • Summer (DST) BST (UTC+1)Postcodes HA, NW, WArea code(s) 020ONS code 00AEGSS code E09000005Police Metropolitan PoliceWebsite http://www.brent.gov.ukThe London
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Social Integration
Social integration
Social integration
is the process during which newcomers or minorities are incorporated into the social structure of the host society.[1] Social integration, together with economic integration and identity integration, are three main dimensions of a newcomers' experiences in the society that is receiving them.[1] A higher extent of social integration contributes to a closer social distance between groups and more consistent values and practices. In a broader view, social integration is a dynamic and structured process in which all members participate in dialogue to achieve and maintain peaceful social relations. Social integration
Social integration
does not mean forced assimilation
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Icelanders
Icelanders
Icelanders
(Icelandic: Íslendingar) are an ethnic group and nation, native to Iceland, mostly speaking the Germanic language Icelandic.[8] Icelanders
Icelanders
established the country of Iceland
Iceland
in 930 A.D. when Althingi (Parliament) met for the first time. Iceland
Iceland
came under the reign of Norwegian, Swedish and Danish kings but regained full sovereignty and independence from the Danish monarchy
Danish monarchy
on 1 December 1918, when Kingdom of Iceland
Iceland
was established. On 17 June 1944, the monarchy was abolished and the Icelandic republic was founded. The language spoken is Icelandic, a North Germanic language, and Lutheranism
Lutheranism
is the predominant religion
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Norwegians
13,798[5] 42,000 Sweden 48,385[6] Australia[c] 25,700[7] Denmark 16,320[8] Germany 6,398[9] New Zealand 1,400[10]LanguagesNorwegian Closely related (mutually intelligible) languages include Danish and Swedish. Other related languages include Faroese and Icelandic, and to a lesser extent all Germanic languages. Norwegian Americans: Historically Norwegian, but later English because of Americanization.Religion Lutheranism
Lutheranism
(Church of Norway)[11] Historically Norse paganism
Norse paganism
and Catholic Christianity.Related ethnic groupsFaroese, Icelanders, Danes, Swedes, Shetlanders, Orcadians, Manx, Normans, Scots, Irish, Dutch, Germans, English Other Germanic ethnic groupsa. ^ Based on table of given countries above. Includes those of partial Norwegian ancestry but does not include people of Faroese, Icelandic, Orcadian or Shetlandic ancestry. b
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The Great Hunger
The Great Famine
Famine
(Irish: an Gorta Mór, [anˠ ˈgɔɾˠt̪ˠa mˠoːɾˠ]) or the Great Hunger was a period of mass starvation, disease, and emigration in Ireland
Ireland
between 1845 and 1849.[1] It is sometimes referred to, mostly outside Ireland, as the Irish Potato Famine, because about two-fifths of the population was solely reliant on this cheap crop for a number of historical reasons.[2][3] During the famine, about one million people died and a million more emigrated from Ireland,[4] causing the island's population to fall by between 20% and 25%.[5] The proximate cause of famine was potato blight,[6] which ravaged potato crops throughout Europe during the 1840s
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Allele
An allele (/əˈliːl/)[1][2] is a variant form of a given gene.[3] Sometimes, different alleles can result in different observable phenotypic traits, such as different pigmentation. A notable example of this trait of color variation is Gregor Mendel's discovery that the white and purple flower colors in pea plants were the result of "pure line" traits which could be used as a control for future experiments. However, most genetic variations result in little or no observable variation. The word "allele" is a short form of allelomorph ("other form", a word coined by British geneticists William Bateson
William Bateson
and Edith Rebecca Saunders),[4][5] which was used in the early days of genetics to describe variant forms of a gene detected as different phenotypes
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Founder Effect
In population genetics, the founder effect is the loss of genetic variation that occurs when a new population is established by a very small number of individuals from a larger population. It was first fully outlined by Ernst Mayr
Ernst Mayr
in 1942,[1] using existing theoretical work by those such as Sewall Wright.[2] As a result of the loss of genetic variation, the new population may be distinctively different, both genotypically and phenotypically, from the parent population from which it is derived. In extreme cases, the founder effect is thought to lead to the speciation and subsequent evolution of new species. In the figure shown, the original population has nearly equal numbers of blue and red individuals. The three smaller founder populations show that one or the other color may predominate (founder effect), due to random sampling of the original population
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Government Of The 17th Dáil
The 17th Dáil
17th Dáil
was elected at the 1961 general election on 4 October 1961 and first met on 11 November when the 10th Government of Ireland was appointed
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Carny
Carny, also spelled carnie, is an informal term used in North America for a traveling carnival employee, and the language they use, particularly when the employee plays a game ("joint"), food stand ("grab" or "popper"), or ride at a carnival. The term "showie" is used synonymously in Australia.[1]Contents1 Etymology 2 Carny
Carny
language 3 Usage in popular culture 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksEtymology[edit] Carny
Carny
is thought to have become popularized around 1931 in North America, when it was first colloquially used to describe one who works at a carnival.[2] The word carnival, originally meaning a "time of merrymaking before Lent," came into use circa 1549. Carny
Carny
language[edit] See also: Polari The carny vocabulary is traditionally part of carnival cant, a secret language
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Cultural Assimilation
Cultural assimilation is the process in which a minority group or culture resembles those of a dominant group. The term is used to refer to both individuals and groups; the latter case can refer to a range of social groups, including ethnic minorities, immigrants, indigenous peoples, and other marginalized groups such as sexual minorities who adapt to being culturally dominated by another societal group. Cultural assimilation may involve either a quick or a gradual change depending on circumstances of the group. Full assimilation occurs when members of a society become indistinguishable from those of the dominant group. Whether it is desirable for a given group to assimilate is often disputed by both members of the group and those of the dominant society
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Multiculturalism
Multiculturalism
Multiculturalism
is a term with a range of meanings in the contexts of sociology, political philosophy, and in colloquial use. In sociology and everyday usage, it is a synonym for "ethnic pluralism" with the two terms often used interchangeably, for example a cultural pluralism in which various ethnic groups collaborate and enter into a dialogue with one another without having to sacrifice their particular identities. It can describe a mixed ethnic community area where multiple cultural traditions exist, or a single country within which they do. Groups associated with an aboriginal ethnic group and foreigner ethnic groups are often the focus. In reference to sociology, multiculturalism is the end state of either a natural or artificial process (e.g. legally controlled immigration) and occurs on either a large national scale or a smaller scale within a nation's communities
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Murphys Estates, South Carolina
Murphys Estates is a neighborhood in Edgefield County, South Carolina, United States. The population was 1,441 at the 2010 census.[3] It is part of the Augusta, Georgia
Augusta, Georgia
metropolitan area. Geography[edit] Murphys Estates is located along the southern border of Edgefield County at 33°35′41″N 81°56′28″W / 33.59472°N 81.94111°W / 33.59472; -81.94111 (33.594591, -81.940999).[4] U.S. Route 25 passes through the community, leading south 8 miles (13 km) into North Augusta and north 17 miles (27 km) to Edgefield, the county seat. Interstate 20
Interstate 20
at Exit 5 is 2 miles (3 km) to the south on US 25. According to the United States Census
Census
Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 2.1 square miles (5.4 km2), all land.[3] Demographics[edit] As of the census[1] of 2000, there were 1,518 people, 534 households, and 410 families residing in the CDP
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Gipsies
The Romani (also spelled Romany /ˈroʊməni/, /ˈrɒ-/), or Roma, are a traditionally itinerant ethnic group, living mostly in Europe
Europe
and the Americas and originating from the northern Indian subcontinent,[55][56][57] from the Rajasthan, Haryana, Punjab
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Gypsie
The Romani (also spelled Romany /ˈroʊməni/, /ˈrɒ-/), or Roma, are a traditionally itinerant ethnic group, living mostly in Europe
Europe
and the Americas and originating from the northern Indian subcontinent,[55][56][57] from the Rajasthan, Haryana, Punjab
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Horse Slaughter
Horse
Horse
slaughter is the practice of slaughtering horses to produce meat for consumption
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