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HiRISE
For the Apple accessory see Twelve South HiRISE
HiRISE
being prepared before it is shipped for attachment to the spacecraftHigh Resolution Imaging Science Experiment is a camera on board the Mars
Mars
Reconnaissance Orbiter. The 65 kg (143 lb), $40 million USD instrument was built under the direction of the University of Arizona's Lunar and Planetary Laboratory
Lunar and Planetary Laboratory
by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp
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Twelve South
Twelve South is a company which produces accessories and cases, including HiRise, exclusively for use with Apple Inc
Apple Inc
products.Contents1 Operation 2 Relationship with Apple 3 Products 4 Criticism 5 Reviews 6 References 7 External linksOperation[edit] The company currently employs a small team of workers (fewer than 12) [1] and aims to design, produce and manufacture 12 new accessories for Apple products every year
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Red
Red
Red
is the color at the end of the visible spectrum of light, next to orange and opposite violet. It has a dominant wavelength of approximately 625–740 nanometres.[1] It is a primary color in the RGB color model
RGB color model
and the CMYK color model, and is the complementary color of cyan. Reds range from the brilliant yellow-tinged scarlet and vermillion to bluish-red crimson, and vary in shade from the pale red pink to the dark red burgundy.[2] The red sky at sunset results from Rayleigh scattering, while the red color of the Grand Canyon
Grand Canyon
and other geological features is caused by hematite or red ochre, both forms of iron oxide
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Alluvial Fans
An alluvial fan is a fan- or cone-shaped deposit of sediment crossed and built up by streams. If a fan is built up by debris flows it is properly called a debris cone or colluvial fan. These flows come from a single point source at the apex of the fan, and over time move to occupy many positions on the fan surface. Fans are typically found where a canyon draining from mountainous terrain emerges out onto a flatter plain, and especially along fault-bounded mountain fronts. A convergence of neighboring alluvial fans into a single apron of deposits against a slope is called a bajada.Contents1 Formation 2 In arid climates 3 In humid climates 4 Flood hazards 5 In the Solar System5.1 Mars 5.2 Titan6 Gallery 7 See also 8 References and notes 9 External linksFormation[edit] As a stream's gradient decreases, it drops coarse-grained material
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Charge-coupled Device
A charge-coupled device (CCD) is a device for the movement of electrical charge, usually from within the device to an area where the charge can be manipulated, for example conversion into a digital value. This is achieved by "shifting" the signals between stages within the device one at a time. CCDs move charge between capacitive bins in the device, with the shift allowing for the transfer of charge between bins. In recent years CCD has become a major technology for digital imaging. In a CCD image sensor, pixels are represented by p-doped metal-oxide-semiconductors (MOS) capacitors. These capacitors are biased above the threshold for inversion when image acquisition begins, allowing the conversion of incoming photons into electron charges at the semiconductor-oxide interface; the CCD is then used to read out these charges
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Angular Resolution
Angular resolution
Angular resolution
or spatial resolution describes the ability of any image-forming device such as an optical or radio telescope, a microscope, a camera, or an eye, to distinguish small details of an object, thereby making it a major determinant of image resolution. In physics and geosciences, the term spatial resolution refers to the precision of a measurement with respect to space.Contents1 Definition of terms 2 Explanation 3 Specific cases3.1 Single telescope 3.2 Telescope array 3.3 Microscope4 Notes 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksDefinition of terms[edit] Resolving power is the ability of an imaging device to separate (i.e., to see as distinct) points of an object that are located at a small angular distance or it is the power of an optical instrument to separate far away objects to separate, that are close together, into individual images
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Radian
The radian (SI symbol rad) is the SI unit for measuring angles, and is the standard unit of angular measure used in many areas of mathematics. The length of an arc of a unit circle is numerically equal to the measurement in radians of the angle that it subtends; one radian is just under 57.3 degrees (expansion at  A072097). The unit was formerly an SI supplementary unit, but this category was abolished in 1995 and the radian is now considered an SI derived unit.[1] Separately, the SI unit of solid angle measurement is the steradian. The radian is most commonly represented by the symbol rad.[2] An alternative symbol is c, the superscript letter c (for "circular measure"), the letter r, or a superscript R,[3] but these symbols are infrequently used as it can be easily mistaken for a degree symbol (°) or a radius (r)
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Blue
Blue
Blue
is one of the three primary colours of pigments in painting and traditional colour theory, as well as in the RGB colour model. It lies between violet and green on the spectrum of visible light. The eye perceives blue when observing light with a dominant wavelength between approximately 450 and 495 nanometres. Most blues contain a slight mixture of other colors; azure contains some green, while ultramarine contains some violet. The clear daytime sky and the deep sea appear blue because of an optical effect known as Rayleigh scattering. An optical effect called Tyndall scattering
Tyndall scattering
explains blue eyes. Distant objects appear more blue because of another optical effect called atmospheric perspective. Blue
Blue
has been an important colour in art and decoration since ancient times
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Green
Green
Green
is the color between blue and yellow on the visible spectrum. It is evoked by light which has a dominant wavelength of roughly 495–570 nm. In subtractive color systems, used in painting and color printing, it is created by a combination of yellow and blue, or yellow and cyan; in the RGB color model, used on television and computer screens, it is one of the additive primary colors, along with red and blue, which are mixed in different combinations to create all other colors. By far the largest contributor to green in nature is chlorophyll, the chemical by which plants photosynthesize and convert sunlight into chemical energy
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Near Infrared
Infrared
Infrared
radiation (IR) is electromagnetic radiation (EMR) with longer wavelengths than those of visible light, and is therefore generally invisible to the human eye (although IR at wavelengths up to 1050 nm from specially pulsed lasers can be seen by humans under certain conditions [1][2][3][4]). It is sometimes called infrared light. IR wavelengths extend from the nominal red edge of the visible spectrum at 700 nanometers (frequency 430 THz), to 1 millimeter (300 GHz)[5] Most of the thermal radiation emitted by objects near room temperature is infrared
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Pingo
A pingo, also called a hydrolaccolith,[1] is a mound of earth-covered ice found in the Arctic
Arctic
and subarctic that can reach up to 70 metres (230 ft) in height and up to 600 m (2,000 ft) in diameter. The term originated as the Inuvialuktun
Inuvialuktun
word for a small hill. The plural form is "pingos". A pingo is a periglacial landform, which is defined as a nonglacial landform or process linked to colder climates. "Periglacial" suggests an environment located on the margin of past glaciers
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Pixel
In digital imaging, a pixel, pel,[1] dots, or picture element[2] is a physical point in a raster image, or the smallest addressable element in an all points addressable display device; so it is the smallest controllable element of a picture represented on the screen. Each pixel is a sample of an original image; more samples typically provide more accurate representations of the original. The intensity of each pixel is variable
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Ground Speed
Ground speed is the horizontal speed of an aircraft relative to the ground. An aircraft heading vertically would have a ground speed of zero. Information displayed to passengers through the entertainment system often gives the aircraft ground speed rather than airspeed. Ground speed can be determined by the vector sum of the aircraft's true airspeed and the current wind speed and direction; a headwind subtracts from the ground speed, while a tailwind adds to it. Winds at other angles to the heading will have components of either headwind or tailwind as well as a crosswind component. An airspeed indicator indicates the aircraft's speed relative to the air mass. The air mass may be moving over the ground due to wind, and therefore some additional means to provide position over the ground is required. This might be through navigation using landmarks, radio aided position location, inertial navigation system, or GPS
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Megapixel
In digital imaging, a pixel, pel,[1] dots, or picture element[2] is a physical point in a raster image, or the smallest addressable element in an all points addressable display device; so it is the smallest controllable element of a picture represented on the screen. Each pixel is a sample of an original image; more samples typically provide more accurate representations of the original. The intensity of each pixel is variable
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JPEG 2000
JPEG
JPEG
2000 (JP2) is an image compression standard and coding system. It was created by the Joint Photographic Experts Group committee in 2000 with the intention of superseding their original discrete cosine transform-based JPEG
JPEG
standard (created in 1992) with a newly designed, wavelet-based method. The standardized filename extension is .jp2 for ISO/IEC 15444-1 conforming files and .jpx for the extended part-2 specifications, published as ISO/IEC 15444-2. The registered MIME types are defined in RFC 3745. For ISO/IEC 15444-1 it is image/jp2. JPEG
JPEG
2000 code streams are regions of interest that offer several mechanisms to support spatial random access or region of interest access at varying degrees of granularity
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