HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Halloween
Halloween
Halloween
or Hallowe'en (a contraction of All Hallows' Evening),[5] also known as Allhalloween,[6] All Hallows' Eve,[7] or All Saints' Eve,[8] is a celebration observed in a number of countries on 31 October, the eve of the Western Christian
Western Christian
feast of All Hallows' Day. It begins the three-day observance of Allhallowtid
[...More...]

"Halloween" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Celts
Pontic SteppeDomestication of the horse Kurgan Kurgan
Kurgan
culture Steppe culturesBug-Dniester Sredny Stog Dnieper-Donets Samara Khvalynsk YamnaMikhaylovka cultureCaucasusMaykopEast-AsiaAfanasevoEastern EuropeUsatovo Cernavodă CucuteniNorthern EuropeCorded wareBaden Middle Dnieper Bronze
[...More...]

"Celts" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Fasting
Fasting
Fasting
is the willing abstinence or reduction from some or all food, drink, or both, for a period of time. An absolute fast or dry fasting is normally defined as abstinence from all food and liquid for a defined period, usually 24 hours, or a number of days. Water fasting allows the drinking of water, but nothing else, although black coffee and tea may be consumed. Other fasts may be partially restrictive, limiting only particular foods or substances, or be intermittent. In a physiological context, fasting may refer to the metabolic status of a person who has not eaten overnight, or to the metabolic state achieved after complete digestion and absorption of a meal. Several metabolic adjustments occur during fasting. Some diagnostic tests are used to determine a fasting state
[...More...]

"Fasting" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Christian Martyr
A Christian martyr is a person who is killed because of their testimony for Jesus.[1] In early church years, this often occurred through stoning, crucifixion, burning at the stake or other forms of torture and capital punishment. The word "martyr" comes from the Greek word μάρτυς, mártys, which means "witness" or "testimony." At first, the term applied to Apostles. Once Christians started to undergo persecution, the term came to be applied to those who suffered hardships for their faith. Finally, it was restricted to those who had been killed for their faith. The early Christian period before Constantine I
Constantine I
was the "Age of martyrs"
[...More...]

"Christian Martyr" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Liturgical Year
The liturgical year, also known as the church year or Christian year, as well as the kalendar,[1] consists of the cycle of liturgical seasons in Christian churches that determines when feast days, including celebrations of saints, are to be observed, and which portions of Scripture
Scripture
are to be read either in an annual cycle or in a cycle of several years. Distinct liturgical colours may appear in connection with different seasons of the liturgical year
[...More...]

"Liturgical Year" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Triduum
A triduum (plural: tridua) is a religious observance lasting three days.[1] The best-known example today is the liturgical Paschal Triduum
Paschal Triduum
(the three days from the evening of Maundy Thursday
Maundy Thursday
to Easter
Easter
Sunday). Other liturgical tridua celebrated in Western Christianity
Western Christianity
include the Rogation Days
Rogation Days
and the feasts of Christmas, Easter
Easter
and Pentecost together with the first two days of their octaves, while in Eastern Christianity (both Orthodox and Catholic) the analogues of festive tridua take the form of a major feasts followed by an associated Synaxis
[...More...]

"Triduum" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Western Christian
Western Christianity
Christianity
is the type of Christianity
Christianity
which developed in the areas of the former Western Roman Empire.[1] Western Christianity consists of the Latin Rite
Latin Rite
of the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
(in contrast to the Eastern rites in communion with Rome) and a wide variety of Protestant denominations. The name "Western Christianity" is applied in order to distinguish these from Eastern Christianity. With the expansion of European colonialism from the Early Modern era, Western Christianity
Christianity
spread throughout the Americas, much of the Philippines, Southern Africa, pockets of West Africa, and throughout Australia
Australia
and New Zealand
[...More...]

"Western Christian" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Evening
Evening
Evening
is the time of day between daytime and night or between sunset and bedtime.[1] There is no precise definition in terms of clock time, but it is considered to start around 6 p.m. and to last until nighttime or bedtime.[2] Social and family activities are often held during this time, such as supper or more formal social gatherings and entertainment, such as parties, in particular dance parties. The word is derived from the Old English
Old English
ǣfnung, meaning "dusk falling, the time around sunset".[2] See also[edit] Crepuscular
Crepuscular
– animals that are active primarily in the early morning and the evening Evening
Evening
dress (other) VespersReferences[edit]^ OED entry at evening. ^ a b "Definition of evening in English". Oxford Dictionaries. Oxford University Press
[...More...]

"Evening" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Saint
A saint (also historically known as a hallow) is a person who is recognized as having an exceptional degree of holiness or likeness or closeness to God.[1][2] Depending on the context and denomination, the term also retains its original Christian
Christian
meaning, as any believer who is "in Christ" and in whom Christ
[...More...]

"Saint" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Vigils
Vigils is a term for night prayer in ancient Christianity. See Vespers, Compline, Nocturns, Matins, and Lauds for more information. A vigil is a night spent in prayer. History[edit] The practice of rising at about the middle of the night, for the purpose of prayer, is as old as the Church.[1] The word "Vigils", at first applied to the night office, also comes from a Latin source, both as to the term and its use, namely the vigiliae or nocturnal watches or guards of the soldiers. The night from six o'clock in the evening to six o'clock in the morning was divided into four watches or vigils of three hours each, the first, the second, the third, and the fourth vigil. From the liturgical point of view and in its origin, the use of the term was very vague and elastic. Generally it designated the nightly meetings, synaxes, of the Christians. Under this form, the watch (vigil) might be said to date back as early as the beginning of Christianity
[...More...]

"Vigils" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Cf.
The abbreviation cf. (short for the Latin: confer/conferatur, both meaning "compare")[1] is used in writing to refer the reader to other material to make a comparison with the topic being discussed. It is used to form a contrast, for example: "Abbott (2010) found supportive results in her memory experiment, unlike those of previous work (cf. Zeller & Williams, 2007)."[2] It is recommended that "cf." be used only to suggest a comparison, and the word "see" be used to point to a source of information.[3][4]Contents1 Biological use 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksBiological use[edit] In biological naming conventions, cf. is commonly placed between the genus name and the species name to describe a specimen that is difficult to identify because of practical difficulties, such as the specimen being poorly preserved. For example, " Barbus
Barbus
cf
[...More...]

"Cf." on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Gaels
The Gaels
Gaels
(Irish pronunciation: [ɡeːlˠ], Scottish Gaelic pronunciation: [kɛː.əlˠ]; Irish: Na Gaeil, Scottish Gaelic: Na Gàidheil, Manx: Ny Gaeil) are an ethnolinguistic group native to northwestern Europe.[a] They are associated with the Gaelic languages: a branch of the Celtic languages
Celtic languages
comprising Irish, Manx and Scottish Gaelic. Historically, the ethnonyms Irish and Scots referred to the Gaels
Gaels
in general, but the scope of those nationalities is today more complex. Gaelic language
Gaelic language
and culture originated in Ireland, extending to Dál Riata in western Scotland. In antiquity the Gaels
Gaels
traded with the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
and also raided Roman Britain. In the Middle Ages, Gaelic culture became dominant throughout the rest of Scotland
Scotland
and the Isle of Man
[...More...]

"Gaels" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Paganism
Paganism
Paganism
is a term first used in the fourth century by early Christianity
Christianity
for populations of the Roman E
[...More...]

"Paganism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Harvest Festival
A harvest festival is an annual celebration that occurs around the time of the main harvest of a given region. Given the differences in climate and crops around the world, harvest festivals can be found at various times at different places. Harvest
Harvest
festivals typically feature feasting, both family and public, with foods that are drawn from crops that come to maturity around the time of the festival. Ample food and freedom from the necessity to work in the fields are two central features of harvest festivals: eating, merriment, contests, music and romance are common features of harvest festivals around the world. In North America, Canada
Canada
and the US each have their own Thanksgiving celebrations in October and November. In Britain, thanks have been given for successful harvests since pagan times
[...More...]

"Harvest Festival" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Vigil
A vigil, from the Latin
Latin
vigilia meaning wakefulness (Greek: pannychis,[1] παννυχίς or agrypnia[2] ἀγρυπνία),[3] is a period of purposeful sleeplessness, an occasion for devotional watching, or an observance. The Italian word vigilia has become generalized in this sense and means "eve" (as in on the eve of the war).Contents1 Eves of religious celebrations 2 Vigils at the time of death 3 Medieval knights 4 See also 5 ReferencesEves of religious celebrations[edit] A vigil may be held on the eve of a major religious festival (feast days), observed by remaining awake—"watchful"—as a devotional exercise or ritual observance on the eve of a holy day.[4] Such liturgical vigils usually consist of psalms, prayers and hymns, possibly a sermon or readings from the Holy Fathers, and sometimes periods of silent meditation. The term "morning" means that the observance begins on the evening before
[...More...]

"Vigil" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Blue Christmas (holiday)
Blue Christmas, also called the Longest Night in the Western Christian tradition, is a day in the Advent
Advent
season marking the longest night of the year.[1] On this day, some churches hold a church service that honors people who have lost loved ones in that year.[2] The Holy Eucharist
Eucharist
is traditionally a part of the service of worship on this day.[3] Some churches hold a service of worship on the longest night of the year, which falls on or about December 21st, the Winter Solstice. There is an interesting convergence for this day as it is also the traditional feast day for Saint Thomas the Apostle
[...More...]

"Blue Christmas (holiday)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.