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Hack (technology Slang)
A computer hacker is any skilled computer expert that uses their technical knowledge to overcome a problem. While "hacker" can refer to any skilled computer programmer, the term has become associated in popular culture with a "security hacker", someone who, with their technical knowledge, uses bugs or exploits to break into computer systems.Contents1 Definitions 2 Types2.1 Hacker
Hacker
culture 2.2 Security related hacking3 Motives 4 Overlaps and differences 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading7.1 Computer
Computer
security 7.2 Free software/open source8 External linksDefinitionsThis section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
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Hacker (other)
A hacker is a highly skilled computer expert, including:Security hacker, someone who seeks and exploits weaknesses in a computer system or computer network Hacker
Hacker
may also refer to:Contents1 Computing and technology 2 People 3 Arts, media, and entertainment 4 Brands and enterprises 5 See alsoComputing and technology Hacker
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Black Hat
A black hat hacker (or black-hat hacker) is a hacker who "violates computer security for little reason beyond maliciousness or for personal gain".[1] The term was coined by hacker culture theorist Richard Stallman
Richard Stallman
to contrast the exploitative hacker with the white hat hacker who hacks protectively by drawing attention to vulnerabilities in computer systems that require repair.[2] The black hat/white hat terminology originates in the Western genre of popular American culture, in which black and white hats den
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Tech Model Railroad Club
The Tech Model Railroad Club
Tech Model Railroad Club
(TMRC) is a student organization at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
(MIT). Historically it has been a wellspring of hacker culture.[1] Formed in 1946, its HO scale
HO scale
layout specializes in automated operation of model trains.Contents1 History 2 Vocabulary and neologisms 3 System layout 4 Current activities 5 Famous members 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] The first meeting was organized by John Fitzallen Moore and Walter Marvin in November 1946.[2] Moore and Marvin had membership cards #0 and #1
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MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory
MIT Computer
Computer
Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) is a research institute at the Massachusetts
Massachusetts
Institute of Technology formed by the 2003 merger of the Laboratory for Computer
Computer
Science and the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. Housed within the Stata Center, CSAIL is the largest on-campus laboratory as measured by research scope and membership.Contents1 Research activities 2 History2.1 Project MAC 2.2 LCS and AI Lab 2.3 CSAIL3 Outreach activities 4 Notable researchers4.1 Notable alumni5 Directors 6 See also 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksResearch activities[edit] CSAIL's research activities are organized around a number of semi-autonomous research groups, each of which is headed by one or more professors or research scientists
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Homebrew Computer Club
The Homebrew Computer Club
Homebrew Computer Club
was an early computer hobbyist group in Silicon Valley
Silicon Valley
which met from March 5, 1975 to December 1986, and was depicted in the films Pirates of Silicon Valley
Silicon Valley
(1999) and Jobs (2013), as well as the PBS
PBS
documentary series, Triumph of the Nerds (1996). Several very high-profile hackers and computer entrepreneurs emerged from its ranks, including the founders of Apple Inc.
Apple Inc.
The open exchange of ideas that went on at its biweekly meetings, and the club newsletter, helped launch the personal computer revolution
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Video Game
A video game is an electronic game that involves interaction with a user interface to generate visual feedback on a video device such as a TV screen or computer monitor. The word video in video game traditionally referred to a raster display device, but as of the 2000s, it implies any type of display device that can produce two- or three-dimensional images. Some theorists categorize video games as an art form, but this designation is controversial. The electronic systems used to play video games are known as platforms; examples of these are personal computers and video game consoles. These platforms range from large mainframe computers to small handheld computing devices
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Software Cracking
Software
Software
cracking (known as "breaking" in the 1980s[1]) is the modification of software to remove or disable features which are considered undesirable by the person cracking the software, especially copy protection features (including protection against the manipulation of software, serial number, hardware key, date checks and disc check) or software annoyances like nag screens and adware. A crack refers to the means of achieving software cracking, for example a stolen serial number or a tool that performs that act of cracking.[2] Some of these tools are called keygen, patch, or loader. A keygen is a handmade product serial number generator that often offers the ability to generate working serial numbers in your own name. A patch is a small computer program that modifies the machine code of another program
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Demoscene
The demoscene is an international computer art subculture that specializes in producing demos: small, self-contained computer programs that produce audio-visual presentations. The main goal of a demo is to show off programming, artistic, and musical skills. The demoscene's roots are in the home computer revolution of the late 1970s, and the subsequent advent of software cracking
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Life Hacking
Life hack (or life hacking) refers to any trick, shortcut, skill, or novelty method that increases productivity and efficiency, in all walks of life
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Vulnerability (computing)
In computer security, a vulnerability is a weakness which can be exploited by a Threat Actor, such as an attacker, to perform unauthorised actions within a computer system. Vulnerabilities are the intersection of three elements: a system susceptibility or flaw, attacker access to the flaw, and attacker capability to exploit the flaw.[1] To exploit a vulnerability, an attacker must have at least one applicable tool or technique that can connect to a system weakness. In this frame, vulnerability is also known as the attack surface. Vulnerability management is the cyclical practice of identifying, classifying, remediating, and mitigating vulnerabilities.[2] This practice generally refers to software vulnerabilities in computing systems. A security risk is often incorrectly classified as a vulnerability. The use of vulnerability with the same meaning of risk can lead to confusion
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Grey Hat
The term "grey hat", alternatively spelled as "greyhat" or "gray hat", refers to a computer hacker or computer security expert who may sometimes violate laws or typical ethical standards, but does not have the malicious intent typical of a black hat hacker. The term began to be used in the late 1990s, derived from the concepts of "white hat" and "black hat" hackers.[1] When a white hat hacker discovers a vulnerability, they will exploit it only with permission and not divulge its existence until it has been fixed, whereas the black hat will illegally exploit it and/or tell others how to do so. The grey hat will neither illegally exploit it, nor tell others how to do so.[2] A further difference among these types of hacker lies in their methods of discovering vulnerabilities
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Internet Troll
In Internet
Internet
slang, a troll (/troʊl, trɒl/) is a person who sows discord on the Internet
Internet
by starting quarrels or upsetting people, by posting inflammatory,[1] extraneous, or off-topic messages in an online community (such as a newsgroup, forum, chat room, or blog) with the intent of provoking readers into an emotional response[2] or of otherwise disrupting normal, on-topic discussion,[3] often for the troll's amusement. This sense of both the noun and the verb "troll" is associated with Internet
Internet
discourse, but also has been used more widely
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Credit Card Number
A payment card number, primary account number (PAN), or simply a card number, is the card identifier found on payment cards, such as credit cards and debit cards, as well as stored-value cards, gift cards and other similar cards. In some situations the card number is referred to as a bank card number. The card number is primarily a card identifier and does not directly identify the bank account number/s to which the card is/are linked by the issuing company. The card number prefix identifies the issuer of the card, and the digits that follow identify a unique account which is associated by the issuing organization with one of its customers and then to the customer's designated bank accounts. In the case of stored-value type cards, the association with a particular customer is only made if the prepaid card is reloadable. Card numbers are allocated in accordance with ISO/IEC 7812
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Systems Designer
Systems design is the process of defining the architecture, modules, interfaces, and data for a system to satisfy specified requirements. Systems design could be seen as the application of systems theory to product development
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Banking System
A bank is a financial institution that accepts deposits from the public and creates credit.[1] Lending
Lending
activities can be performed either directly or indirectly through capital markets. Due to their importance in the financial stability of a country, banks are highly regulated in most countries. Most nations have institutionalized a system known as fractional reserve banking under which banks hold liquid assets equal to only a portion of their current liabilities. In addition to other regulations intended to ensure liquidity, banks are generally subject to minimum capital requirements based on an international set of capital standards, known as the Basel Accords. Banking
Banking
in its modern sense evolved in the 14th century in the prosperous cities of Renaissance Italy
Renaissance Italy
but in many ways was a continuation of ideas and concepts of credit and lending that had their roots in the ancient world
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