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Gorgythion
In Greek mythology
Greek mythology
, GORGYTHION (Greek : Γοργυθίων, gen.: Γοργυθίωνος) was one of the sons of King Priam
Priam
of Troy
Troy
at the time of the Trojan War
Trojan War
and appears as a minor character in Homer 's Iliad
Iliad
. His mother was Castianeira of AISYME. CONTENTS * 1 Name and description * 2 Family * 3 Mythology * 4 Other uses of the name * 5 See also * 6 References NAME AND DESCRIPTIONIn the Iliad, Gorgythion is described as beautiful, and his epithet is the blameless. Jane Ellen Harrison
Jane Ellen Harrison
pointed out that "blameless" (άμύμων) was an epithet of the heroized dead, who were venerated and appeased at shrines. Zeus even applies the epithet to Aegisthus
Aegisthus
, the usurper, Harrison observes
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Epithets In Homer
A characteristic of Homer 's style is the use of EPITHETS, as in "rosy-fingered" dawn or "swift-footed" Achilles . Epithets are used because of the constraints of the dactylic hexameter (i.e., it is convenient to have a stockpile of metrically fitting phrases to add to a name) and because of the oral transmission of the poems; they are mnemonic aids to the singer and the audience alike. Epithets in epic poetry from various Indo-European traditions may be traced to a common tradition. For example, the phrase for "everlasting glory" or "undying fame" can be found in the Homeric Greek as κλέος ἄφθιτον / kléos áphthiton and the Sanskrit as श्रवो अक्षितम् / śrávo ákṣitam. These two phrases were, in terms of historical linguistics, equivalent in phonology , accentuation , and quantity (syllable length)
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Jane Ellen Harrison
JANE ELLEN HARRISON (9 September 1850 – 15 April 1928) was a British classical scholar, linguist . Harrison is one of the founders, with Karl Kerenyi
Karl Kerenyi
and Walter Burkert , of modern studies in Ancient Greek religion and mythology . She applied 19th century archaeological discoveries to the interpretation of ancient Greek religion in ways that have become standard. She has also been credited with being the first woman to obtain a post in England as a ‘career academic’. Harrison argued for women\'s suffrage but thought she would never want to vote herself. Ellen Wordsworth Crofts, later second wife of Sir Francis Darwin , was Jane Harrison's best friend from her student days at Newnham, and during the period from 1898 to her death in 1903
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Aegisthus
AEGISTHUS (/ɪˈdʒɪsθəs/ ; Ancient Greek : Αἴγισθος; also transliterated as AIGISTHOS) is a figure in Greek mythology
Greek mythology
. He was the son of Thyestes and his daughter, Pelopia . The product of an incestuous union motivated by his father's rivalry with the house of Atreus
Atreus
for the throne of Mycenae, Aegisthus
Aegisthus
murdered Atreus
Atreus
to restore his father to power. Later, he lost the throne to Atreus's son Agamemnon
Agamemnon
. While Agamemnon
Agamemnon
was at the Trojan war
Trojan war
, Aegisthus
Aegisthus
became the lover of the king's estranged wife Clytemnestra
Clytemnestra
. The couple killed Agamemnon on his return
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Skipper Butterfly
SKIPPERS are a family , HESPERIIDAE, of the Lepidoptera
Lepidoptera
(moths and butterflies). Being diurnal, they are generally called butterflies. They were previously placed in a separate superfamily, HESPERIOIDEA; however, the most recent taxonomy places the family in the superfamily Papilionoidea
Papilionoidea
. They are named for their quick, darting flight habits. Most have the antenna tip modified into a narrow hook-like projection. More than 3500 species of skippers are recognized, and they occur worldwide, but with the greatest diversity in the Neotropical
Neotropical
regions of Central and South America
South America

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Trojan War
SETTING: Troy (modern Hisarlik , Turkey ) PERIOD: Bronze Age TRADITIONAL DATING: c. 1194–1184 BC MODERN DATING: c
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Alexander Pope
ALEXANDER POPE (21 May 1688 – 30 May 1744) was an 18th-century English poet. He is best known for his satirical verse and for his translation of Homer
Homer
, and he is also famous for his use of the heroic couplet . He is the second-most frequently quoted writer in The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations after Shakespeare
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Greek Mythology
GREEK MYTHOLOGY is the body of myths and teachings that belong to the ancient Greeks , concerning their gods and heroes , the nature of the world , and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. It was a part of the religion in ancient Greece . Modern scholars refer to and study the myths in an attempt to shed light on the religious and political institutions of ancient Greece and its civilization, and to gain understanding of the nature of myth-making itself. Greek mythology
Greek mythology
has had an extensive influence on the culture, arts, and literature of Western civilization and remains part of Western heritage and language. Poets and artists from ancient times to the present have derived inspiration from Greek mythology
Greek mythology
and have discovered contemporary significance and relevance in the themes
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Greek Language
GREEK ( Modern Greek : ελληνικά , elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα ( listen ), ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece
Greece
and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean . It has the longest documented history of any living Indo-European language, spanning 34 centuries of written records. Its writing system has been the Greek alphabet for the major part of its history; other systems, such as Linear B and the Cypriot syllabary , were used previously. The alphabet arose from the Phoenician script and was in turn the basis of the Latin
Latin
, Cyrillic
Cyrillic
, Armenian , Coptic , Gothic and many other writing systems
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Phaeacia
SCHERIA (/ˈskɛriə/ ; Ancient Greek : Σχερίη or Σχερία)—also known as SCHERIE or PHAEACIA—was a region in Greek mythology , first mentioned in Homer 's Odyssey as the home of the Phaeacians and the last destination of Odysseus in his 10-year journey before returning home to Ithaca . CONTENTS * 1 From Ogygia to Scheria * 2 Odysseus meets Nausicaa * 3 The palace of King Alcinous * 4 The Phaeacian ships * 5 Geographical location of Scheria * 5.1 Geographical account by Strabo * 6 Notes * 7 External links FROM OGYGIA TO SCHERIABefore leaving Ogygia , Odysseus builds a raft and sails eastwards, instructed by Calypso to navigate using the stars as a celestial reference point. On the eighteenth day appear the shadowy mountains of the land of the Phaeacians, that looked like a shield in the misty deep. But Poseidon spots his raft and seeking vengeance for his son Polyphemus who was blinded by Odysseus, produces a storm that torments Odysseus
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Helios
HELIOS (/ˈhiːli.ɒs/ ; Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
: Ἥλιος Hēlios; Latinized as Helius; Ἠέλιος in Homeric Greek ) was the personification of the Sun
Sun
in Greek mythology
Greek mythology
. He is the son of the Titan Hyperion and the Titaness Theia (according to Hesiod
Hesiod
), also known as Euryphaessa (in Homeric Hymn 31) and brother of the goddesses Selene
Selene
, the moon, and Eos
Eos
, the dawn. Helios
Helios
was described as a handsome titan crowned with the shining aureole of the Sun, who drove the chariot of the sun across the sky each day to earth-circling Oceanus
Oceanus
and through the world-ocean returned to the East at night
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Gaius Julius Hyginus
GAIUS JULIUS HYGINUS (/hᵻˈdʒaɪnəs/ ; c. 64 BC – AD 17) was a Latin
Latin
author, a pupil of the famous Cornelius Alexander Polyhistor , and a freedman of Caesar Augustus
Augustus
. He was elected superintendent of the Palatine library by Augustus
Augustus
according to Suetonius\' De Grammaticis, 20. It is not clear whether Hyginus was a native of the Iberian Peninsula or of Alexandria
Alexandria
. Suetonius remarks that he fell into great poverty in his old age, and was supported by the historian Clodius Licinus . Hyginus was a voluminous author: his works included topographical and biographical treatises, commentaries on Helvius Cinna and the poems of Virgil
Virgil
, and disquisitions on agriculture and bee-keeping . All these are lost
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Samuel Butler (novelist)
SAMUEL BUTLER (4 December 1835 – 18 June 1902) was the iconoclastic English author of the Utopian
Utopian
satirical novel Erewhon
Erewhon
(1872) and the semi-autobiographical Bildungsroman The Way of All Flesh , published posthumously in 1903. Both have remained in print ever since. In other studies he examined Christian orthodoxy , evolutionary thought , and Italian art, and made prose translations of the Iliad
Iliad
and Odyssey
Odyssey
that are still consulted today. He was also an artist
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Bibliotheca (Pseudo-Apollodorus)
The BIBLIOTHECA ( Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
: Βιβλιοθήκη Bibliothēkē, "Library"), also known as the BIBLIOTHECA OF PSEUDO-APOLLODORUS, is a compendium of Greek myths and heroic legends , arranged in three books, generally dated to the first or second century AD. The author was traditionally thought to be Apollodorus of Athens , but that attribution is now regarded as false, and so " Pseudo- " was added to Apollodorus The Bibliotheca has been called "the most valuable mythographical work that has come down from ancient times". An epigram recorded by the important intellectual Patriarch Photius I of Constantinople expressed its purpose: It has the following not ungraceful epigram: 'Draw your knowledge of the past from me and read the ancient tales of learned lore . Look neither at the page of Homer
Homer
, nor of elegy , nor tragic muse , nor epic strain
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Teucrian
In Greek mythology , KING TEUCER or TEUCRUS (Greek : Τεῦκρος) was said to have been the son of the river Scamander and the nymph Idaea . CONTENTS * 1 Mythology * 2 Family tree * 3 References * 4 See also MYTHOLOGYBefore the arrival of Dardanus , the land that would eventually be called Dardania (and later still the Troad ) was known as Teucria and the inhabitants as Teucrians, after Teucer. According to Virgil , Teucer was originally from Crete but left the island during a great famine with a third of its inhabitants. They settled near the Scamander river, named after Teucer's father, not far from the Rhaetean promontory. However, Dionysius of Halicarnassus states that Teucer had come to the Troad from Attica where he was a chief of the Xypetȇ region. In both cases he ended up in the region which would be known as the Troad . His company was said to have been greatly annoyed by a vast number of mice during their first night in the region
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Herodotus
HERODOTUS (/hɪˈrɒdətəs/ ; Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
: Ἡρόδοτος, Hêródotos, Attic Greek pronunciation: ) was a Greek historian who was born in Halicarnassus in the Persian Empire
Persian Empire
(modern-day Bodrum , Turkey
Turkey
) and lived in the fifth century BC (c. 484–c. 425 BC), a contemporary of Thucydides
Thucydides
, Socrates
Socrates
, and Euripides . He is often referred to as "The Father of History", a title first conferred by Cicero
Cicero
; he was the first historian known to have broken from Homeric tradition to treat historical subjects as a method of investigation—specifically, by collecting his materials systematically and critically, and then arranging them into a historiographic narrative
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