HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Genitive
In grammar, genitive (abbreviated gen;[1] also called the second case) is the grammatical case that marks a noun as modifying another noun. It often marks a noun as being the possessor of another noun.[2] However, it can also indicate various relationships other than possession: certain verbs may take arguments in the genitive case, and it may have adverbial uses (see Adverbial genitive). Placing the modifying noun in the genitive case is one way to indicate that two nouns are related in a genitive construction. Modern English typically does not morphologically mark nouns for a genitive case in order to indicate a genitive construction; instead, it uses either the 's clitic or a preposition (usually of). However, the personal pronouns do have distinct possessive forms. There are various other ways to indicate a genitive construction, as well
[...More...]

"Genitive" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Grammar
In linguistics, grammar (from Greek: γραμματική) is the set of structural rules governing the composition of clauses, phrases, and words in any given natural language. The term refers also to the study of such rules, and this field includes phonology, morphology, and syntax, often complemented by phonetics, semantics, and pragmatics. Speakers of a language have a set of internalized rules[1] for using that language and these rules constitute that language's grammar. The vast majority of the information in the grammar is — at least in the case of one's native language—acquired not by conscious study or instruction, but by observing other speakers
[...More...]

"Grammar" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Afroasiatic Languages
Afroasiatic (Afro-Asiatic), also known as Afrasian and traditionally as Hamito-Semitic (Chamito-Semitic)[3] or Semito-Hamitic,[4] is a large language family of about 300 languages and dialects.[5] It includes languages spoken predominantly in West Asia, North Africa, the Horn of Africa
Horn of Africa
and parts of the Sahel. Afroasiatic languages
Afroasiatic languages
have over 495 million native speakers, the fourth largest number of any language family (after Indo-European, Sino-Tibetan and Niger–Congo).[6] The phylum has six branches: Berber, Chadic, Cushitic, Egyptian, Omotic
Omotic
and Semitic. By far the most widely spoken Afroasiatic language is Arabic. A language within the Semitic branch, it includes Modern Standard Arabic as well as spoken colloquial varieties
[...More...]

"Afroasiatic Languages" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Macedonian Language
Macedonian (/ˌmæsɪˈdoʊniən/; македонски, tr. makedonski, pronounced [maˈkɛdɔnski ˈjazik] ( listen)) is a South Slavic language spoken as a first language by around two million people, principally in the Republic of Macedonia
Republic of Macedonia
and the Macedonian diaspora, with a smaller number of speakers throughout the transnational region of Macedonia. It is the official language of the Republic of Macedonia
Republic of Macedonia
and a recognized minority language in parts of Albania, Romania
Romania
and Serbia. Standard Macedonian was implemented as the official language of the Socialist Republic of Macedonia
Republic of Macedonia
in 1945[8] and has since developed a modern literature
[...More...]

"Macedonian Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Bulgarian Language
 Moldova  Ukraine  Serbia  Albania  RomaniaRegulated by Institute for the Bulgarian language
Bulgarian language
at the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences (Институт за български език при Българската академия на науките (БАН))Language codesISO 639-1 bgISO 639-2 bulISO 639-3 bulGlottolog bulg1262[7]Linguasphere 53-AAA-hb < 53-AAA-hThis article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode
Unicode
characters
[...More...]

"Bulgarian Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Slavic Languages
The Slavic languages
Slavic languages
(also called Slavonic languages) are the Indo-European languages
Indo-European languages
spoken by the Slavic peoples. They are thought to descend from a proto-language called Proto-Slavic spoken during the Early Middle Ages, which in turn is thought to have descended from the earlier Proto-Balto-Slavic language, linking the Slavic languages
Slavic languages
to the Baltic languages
Baltic languages
in a Balto-Slavic group within the Indo-European family. The Slavic languages
Slavic languages
are divided intro three subgroups: East, West, and South, which together constitute more than twenty languages
[...More...]

"Slavic Languages" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Telugu Language
 India Spoken in these States and union territories of India:Andhra Pradesh TelanganaLanguage codesISO 639-1 teISO 639-2 telISO 639-3 telGlottolog telu1262  Telugu[3] oldt1249  Old Telugu[4]Linguasphere 49-DBA-aaTelugu is native to Andhra Pradesh
Andhra Pradesh
and TelanganaThis article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode
Unicode
characters. For an introductory guide on IPA symbols, see Help:IPA.Telugu (English: /ˈtɛlʊɡuː/;[5] తెలుగు [t̪el̪uɡu]) is a South-central Dravidian language
Dravidian language
native to India
[...More...]

"Telugu Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic
or Scots Gaelic, sometimes also referred to simply as Gaelic (Gàidhlig [ˈkaːlikʲ] ( listen)) or the Gaelic, is a Celtic language native to the Gaels
Gaels
of Scotland. A member of the Goidelic branch of the Celtic languages, Scottish Gaelic, like Modern Irish and Manx, developed out of Middle Irish. Most of modern Scotland was once Gaelic-speaking, as evidenced especially by Gaelic-language placenames.[3] In the 2011 census of Scotland, 57,375 people (1.1% of the Scottish population aged over three years old) reported as able to speak Gaelic, 1,275 fewer than in 2001
[...More...]

"Scottish Gaelic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sanskrit
A few attempts at revival have been reported in Indian and Nepalese newspapers. India: 14,135 Indians claimed Sanskrit
Sanskrit
to be their mother tongue in the 2001 Census of India:[2] Nepal: 1,669 Nepalis
Nepalis
in 2011
[...More...]

"Sanskrit" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hungarian Language
Hungarian ( magyar nyelv (help·info)) is a Finno-Ugric language spoken in Hungary
Hungary
and several neighbouring countries. It is the official language of Hungary
Hungary
and one of the 24 official languages of the European Union. Outside Hungary
Hungary
it is also spoken by communities of Hungarians
Hungarians
in the countries that today make up Slovakia, western Ukraine, central and western Romania
Romania
(Transylvania and Partium), northern Serbia
Serbia
(Vojvodina), southern Poland[citation needed], northern Croatia, and northern Slovenia
Slovenia
due to the effects of the Treaty of Trianon, which resulted in many ethnic Hungarians
Hungarians
being displaced from their homes and communities in the former territories of the Austro-Hungarian Empire
[...More...]

"Hungarian Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Basque Language
Basque (/bæsk/ or /bɑːsk/;[4] Basque: euskara, IPA: [eus̺ˈkaɾa]) is the language spoken in the Basque country. Linguistically, Basque is unrelated to the other languages of Europe and indeed, as a language isolate, to any other known living language. The Basques
Basques
are indigenous to, and primarily inhabit, the Basque Country, a region that straddles the westernmost Pyrenees
Pyrenees
in adjacent parts of northern Spain
Spain
and southwestern France
[...More...]

"Basque Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Greek Language
Greek (Modern Greek: ελληνικά [eliniˈka], elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα [eliniˈci ˈɣlosa] ( listen), ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece
Greece
and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean
[...More...]

"Greek Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Morphology (linguistics)
In linguistics, morphology (/mɔːrˈfɒlədʒi/[1]) is the study of words, how they are formed, and their relationship to other words in the same language.[2][3] It analyzes the structure of words and parts of words, such as stems, root words, prefixes, and suffixes. Morphology also looks at parts of speech, intonation and stress, and the ways context can change a word's pronunciation and meaning. Morphology differs from morphological typology, which is the classification of languages based on their use of words,[4] and lexicology, which is the study of words and how they make up a language's vocabulary.[5] While words, along with clitics, are generally accepted as being the smallest units of syntax, in most languages, if not all, many words can be related to other words by rules that collectively describe the grammar for that language
[...More...]

"Morphology (linguistics)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Verb
A verb, from the Latin
Latin
verbum meaning word, is a word (part of speech) that in syntax conveys an action (bring, read, walk, run, learn), an occurrence (happen, become), or a state of being (be, exist, stand). In the usual description of English, the basic form, with or without the particle to, is the infinitive. In many languages, verbs are inflected (modified in form) to encode tense, aspect, mood, and voice. A verb may also agree with the person, gender or number of some of its arguments, such as its subject, or object
[...More...]

"Verb" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Adverb
An adverb is a word that modifies a verb, adjective, another adverb, determiner, noun phrase, clause, or sentence. Adverbs typically express manner, place, time, frequency, degree, level of certainty, etc., answering questions such as how?, in what way?, when?, where?, and to what extent?
[...More...]

"Adverb" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.