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Forbes
Forbes
Forbes
(/fɔːrbz/) is an American business magazine. Published bi-weekly, it features original articles on finance, industry, investing, and marketing topics. Forbes
Forbes
also reports on related subjects such as technology, communications, science, politics, and law. Its headquarters is located in Jersey City, New Jersey. Primary competitors in the national business magazine category include Fortune and Bloomberg Businessweek. The magazine is well known for its lists and rankings, including of the richest Americans (the Forbes
Forbes
400), of the world's top companies (the Forbes
Forbes
Global 2000), and The World's Billionaires
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Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
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William Randolph Hearst
William Randolph Hearst
William Randolph Hearst
Sr. (/hɜːrst/;[1] April 29, 1863 – August 14, 1951) was an American businessman, politician, and newspaper publisher who built the nation's largest newspaper chain and media company Hearst Communications
Hearst Communications
and whose flamboyant methods of yellow journalism influenced the nation's popular media by emphasizing sensationalism and human interest stories. Hearst entered the publishing business in 1887 after being given control of The San Francisco Examiner by his wealthy father. Moving to New York City, he acquired The New York Journal
New York Journal
and fought a bitter circulation war with Joseph Pulitzer's New York World
New York World
that sold papers by giant headlines over lurid stories featuring crime, corruption, graphics, sex, and innuendo
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International Standard Book Number
The International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique.[a][b] Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each separate edition and variation (except reprintings) of a publication. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book will each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is ten digits long if assigned before 2007, and thirteen digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-specific and varies between countries, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN identification format was devised in 1967, based upon the 9-digit Standard Book
Book
Numbering (SBN) created in 1966
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Alliance For Audited Media
The Alliance for Audited Media (AAM) is a North American non-profit industry organization founded in 1914 by the Association of National Advertisers to help ensure media transparency and trust among advertisers and media companies. Originally known as the Audit Bureau of Circulations (ABC), today AAM is a source of verified media information and technology platform certifications, providing standards, audit services and data for the advertising and publishing industries. It is one of more than three dozen such organizations operating worldwide, affiliated with the International Federation of Audit Bureaux of Circulations (IFABC). AAM independently verifies print and digital circulation, mobile apps, website analytics, social media, technology platforms and audience information for newspapers, magazines and digital media companies in the U.S. and Canada
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Poynter Institute
The Poynter Institute for Media Studies is a non-profit school for journalism located in St. Petersburg, Florida. The school is the owner of the Tampa Bay Times
Tampa Bay Times
newspaper.[2] The school began on May 29, 1975, when Nelson Poynter, the owner and chairman of the St. Petersburg Times (now the Tampa Bay Times) and Times Publishing Company, announced that he planned to start a small journalism school called the Modern Media Institute. (The name of the school was changed to the Poynter Institute almost a decade later.) In 1977, Nelson Poynter willed ownership of the Times Publishing Company to the Institute so that after his death the school would become the owner of the St. Petersburg Times. Poynter died on June 15, 1978, at the age of 74. He had become ill in his office just a few hours after he helped break ground for the new St
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Internet Journalism
Journalism
Journalism
is the production and the distribution of reports on recent events. The word journalism applies to the occupation (professional or not), the methods of gathering information, and the organizing literary styles. Journalistic media include: print, television, radio, Internet, and, in the past, newsreels. Concepts of the appropriate role for journalism vary between countries. In some nations, the news media is controlled by a government intervention, and is not a fully independent body.[1] In others, the news media is independent from the government but the profit motive is in tension with constitutional protections of freedom of the press. Access to freely available information gathered by independent and competing journalistic enterprises with transparent editorial standards can enable citizens to effectively participate in the political process
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Journalistic Fraud
Journalism
Journalism
is the production and the distribution of reports on recent events. The word journalism applies to the occupation (professional or not), the methods of gathering information, and the organizing literary styles. Journalistic media include: print, television, radio, Internet, and, in the past, newsreels. Concepts of the appropriate role for journalism vary between countries. In some nations, the news media is controlled by a government intervention, and is not a fully independent body.[1] In others, the news media is independent from the government but the profit motive is in tension with constitutional protections of freedom of the press. Access to freely available information gathered by independent and competing journalistic enterprises with transparent editorial standards can enable citizens to effectively participate in the political process
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Public Offering
A public offering is the offering of securities of a company or a similar corporation to the public. Generally, the securities are to be listed on a stock exchange. In most jurisdictions, a public offering requires the issuing company to publish a prospectus detailing the terms and rights attached to the offered security, as well as information on the company itself and its finances. Many other regulatory requirements surround any public offering and they vary according to jurisdiction. Initial public offering
Initial public offering
(IPO) is one type of public offering. Not all public offerings are IPOs. An IPO occurs only when a company offers its shares (not other securities) for the first time for public ownership and trading, an act making it a public company. However, public offerings are also made by already-listed companies. The company issues additional securities to the public, adding to those currently being traded
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Invention And Technology Magazine
Technology
Technology
("science of craft", from Greek τέχνη, techne, "art, skill, cunning of hand"; and -λογία, -logia[2]) is the collection of techniques, skills, methods, and processes used in the production of goods or services or in the accomplishment of objectives, such as scientific investigation. Technology
Technology
can be the knowledge of techniques, processes, and the like, or it can be embedded in machines to allow for operation without detailed knowledge of their workings. The simplest form of technology is the development and use of basic tools. The prehistoric discovery of how to control fire and the later Neolithic Revolution
Neolithic Revolution
increased the available sources of food, and the invention of the wheel helped humans to travel in and control their environment
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India
India
India
(official name: the Republic
Republic
of India;[19] Hindi: Bhārat Gaṇarājya) is a country in South Asia. It is the seventh-largest country by area, the second-most populous country, and the most populous democracy in the world. Bounded by the Indian Ocean on the south, the Arabian Sea
Arabian Sea
on the southwest, and the Bay of Bengal on the southeast, it shares land borders with Pakistan
Pakistan
to the west;[d] China, Nepal, and Bhutan
Bhutan
to the north; and Bangladesh and Myanmar
Myanmar
to the east
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Newport, Jersey City
Coordinates: 40°43′47″N 74°02′11″W / 40.729698°N 74.036350°W / 40.729698; -74.036350View of Newport from the Hudson RiverNewport is a 600-acre (2.4 km2) master-planned, mixed-use community in Downtown Jersey City, New Jersey, United States, consisting of retail, residential, office, and entertainment facilities. The neighborhood is situated on the Hudson Waterfront opposite the Tribeca
Tribeca
area of Lower Manhattan
Lower Manhattan
in New York City, on what had been the yards of Erie Railroad's Pavonia Terminal. Redevelopment of the neighborhood began in 1986 as a $10 billion project led by real-estate tycoon Samuel J
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Sale-leaseback
Leaseback, short for "sale-and-leaseback," is a financial transaction in which one sells an asset and leases it back for the long term; therefore, one continues to be able to use the asset but no longer owns it. The transaction is generally done for fixed assets, notably real estate, as well as for durable and capital goods such as airplanes and trains. The concept can also be applied by national governments to territorial assets; prior to the Falklands War, the government of the United Kingdom proposed a leaseback arrangement whereby the Falklands Islands
Falklands Islands
would be transferred to Argentina, with a 99-year leaseback period,[1] and a similar arrangement, also for 99 years, had been in place prior to the handover of Hong Kong to mainland China
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Downtown Jersey City
Downtown is an area of Jersey City, New Jersey, United States, which includes the Historic Downtown and the Waterfront. Historic Downtown can be further broken down into the neighborhoods of Harsimus
Harsimus
Cove, The Village, Van Vorst Park, Grove Street, Hamilton Park and Boyle Plaza. The Waterfront includes the Powerhouse Arts District/WALDO, Newport, the Harborside Financial Center
Harborside Financial Center
and Paulus Hook (including Exchange Place). Historic Downtown is the area west of Marin Boulevard, while the Waterfront lies to the east. Historic Downtown was an area of mostly low-rise buildings to the west of the waterfront—but that is rapidly changing. It includes the neighborhoods of Van Vorst Park
Van Vorst Park
and Hamilton Park, which are square parks surrounded by brownstones
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Chief Editor
An editor-in-chief, also known as lead editor, chief editor, managing or executive editor, is a publication's editorial leader who has final responsibility for its operations and policies.[1][2]Contents1 Description 2 References 3 Further reading 4 External linksDescription[edit] The editor-in-chief heads all departments of the organization and is held accountable for delegating tasks to staff members and managing them. The term is often used at newspapers, magazines, yearbooks, and television news programs. The editor-in-chief is commonly the link between the publisher or proprietor and the editorial stafplied to academic journals, where the editor-in-chief gives the ultimate decision whether a submitted manuscript will be published
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Biweekly
Biweekly may refer to occurring twice a week, or occurring every two weeks.[1][2] Due to this ambiguity, many style guides recommend to never use the term and to replace with unambiguous expressions.[3] There are 52 full weeks in a year of 12 months (ISO 8601 defines a year as containing 52 or 53 weeks), making for a possible 26 or 104 biweekly events in a year. This is a greater number than if such events were held twice a month, because most months have more than four weeks (28 days). In the United Kingdom, Australia and New Zealand, the term fortnightly is more commonly used for an event that occurs every two weeks. In the US, a biweekly publication is issued every two weeks and a bimonthly publication is issued every two months. New York State SNAP refers to a biweekly paycheck as every 2 weeks.[citation needed] References and Notes[edit]^ "biweekly". Online dictionary. Merriam-Webster. Retrieved 19 February 2008.  ^ Straus, Jane (2008-07-29). "Bi vs
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