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Eupolis
Eupolis (Greek: Εὔπολις; c. 446 – c. 411 BC) was an Athenian poet of the Old Comedy, who flourished during the time of the Peloponnesian War.Contents1 Biography 2 Works 3 Death and burial 4 Reputation 5 References 6 Sources 7 External linksBiography[edit] Nothing whatsoever is known of his personal history. There are few sources on when he first appeared on the stage. A short history of Greek Comedy, written by an anonymous writer of antiquity, reports that Eupolis first produced in the year where Apollodorus was the Eponymous archon, which would be 430/429 BC. The same source claims Phrynichus also debuted that year. The Chronicon of Eusebius of Caesarea instead places his debut in 428/427 BC and adds that Aristophanes
Aristophanes
also started producing that year. This is the version preserved in the Latin translation by Jerome
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Greek Language
Greek (Modern Greek: ελληνικά [eliniˈka], elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα [eliniˈci ˈɣlosa] ( listen), ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece
Greece
and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean
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Themistius
Themistius (Greek: Θεμίστιος, Themistios; 317, Paphlagonia – c. 390 AD, Constantinople), named εὐφραδής (eloquent),[1] was a statesman, rhetorician, and philosopher. He flourished in the reigns of Constantius II, Julian, Jovian, Valens, Gratian, and Theodosius I; and he enjoyed the favour of all those emperors, notwithstanding their many differences, and the fact that he himself was not a Christian. He was admitted to the senate by Constantius in 355, and he was prefect of Constantinople
Constantinople
in 384 on the nomination of Theodosius
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Deme
In Ancient Greece, a deme or demos (Greek: δῆμος) was a suburb of Athens or a subdivision of Attica, the region of Greece
Greece
surrounding Athens. Demes as simple subdivisions of land in the countryside seem to have existed in the 6th century BC and earlier, but did not acquire particular significance until the reforms of Cleisthenes
Cleisthenes
in 508 BC. In those reforms, enrollment in the citizen-lists of a deme became the requirement for citizenship; prior to that time, citizenship had been based on membership in a phratry, or family group. At this same time, demes were established in the city of Athens itself, where they had not previously existed; in all, at the end of Cleisthenes' reforms, Attica
Attica
was divided into 139 demes[1] to which one should add Berenikidai, established in 224/223 BC, Apollonieis (201/200 BC) and Antinoeis (126/127)
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Cimon
Battle of Salamis Battle of Salamis
Battle of Salamis
(in Cyprus) Persian WarsMost important geographical locations during Cimon's life.Timeline Cimon
Cimon
(/ˈsaɪmən/;[citation needed] c. 510 – 450 BC) or Kimon (/ˈkimɔːn/;[1] Greek: Κίμων, Kimōn)[2] was an Athenian statesman and general in mid-5th century BC Greece. He was the son of Miltiades, the victor of the Battle of Marathon. Cimon played a key role in creating the powerful Athenian maritime empire following the failure of the Persian invasion of Greece by Xerxes I in 480-479 BC. Cimon
Cimon
became a celebrated military hero and was elevated to the rank of admiral after fighting in the Battle of Salamis. One of Cimon’s greatest exploits was his destruction of a Persian fleet and army at the Battle of the Eurymedon
Battle of the Eurymedon
river in 466 BC
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Autolycus
In Greek mythology, Autolycus (/ɔːˈtɒlɪkəs/; Greek: Αὐτόλυκος Autolykos, "the wolf itself", or "very wolf")[1] was a son of the Olympian god Hermes
Hermes
and Chione. He was the husband of Neaera,[2] or according to Homer,[3] of Amphithea
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Helots
This article is part of the series: Spartan ConstitutionGreat Rhetra Laws of Lycurgus PoliteiaList of Kings of Sparta Gerousia Ephorate Apella Spartiates Perioeci Helots Agoge SyssitiaSpartan army •   Other Greek city-states •  Law Portalview talk editThe helots (/ˈhɛləts, ˈhiːləts/; Ancient Greek: εἵλωτες, heílotes) were a subjugated population group that formed the main population of Laconia
Laconia
and Messenia, the territory controlled by Sparta
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Prospalta
Prospalta is a genus of moths of the Noctuidae family. Species[edit]Prospalta atricupreoides Draeseke, 1928 Prospalta contigua Leech, 1900 Prospalta coptica Wiltshire, 1948 Prospalta cyclina Hampson Prospalta definita Warren, 1914 Prospalta enigmatica Turati & Krüger, 1936 Prospalta immatura Warren, 1914 Prospalta leucospila Walker, [1858] Prospalta ochrisquamata Warren, 1912 Prospalta pallidipennis Warren, 1912 Prospalta parva Leech, 1900 Prospalta siderea Leech, 1900 Prospalta stellata Moore, 1882 Prospalta subalbida Warren, 1914 Prospalta xylocola Strand, 1920References[edit]Natural History Museum Lepidoptera genus database Prospalta at funetTaxon identifiersWd: Q7250718 ButMoth: 24170.0 EoL: 66075 Fauna Europaea: 67650 LepIndex: 268452.0 NCBI: 1369596This Hadeninae-related article is a stub
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Sicilian Expedition
Decisive Spartan/Syracusan victoryAthenian expeditionary force completely destroyedBelligerentsAthens Allies: Delian League Segesta Syracuse, Corinth, SpartaCommanders and leadersNicias (POW) , Lamachus †, Demosthenes (POW) , Eurymedon † Gylippus, HermocratesStrengthOriginal Expedition: 5,100 hoplites 750 Mantineans and Argives 1,300 light and missile troops 30 cavalry 134 triremes[1] Reinforcements: 5,000 hoplites Large number of light troops 73 triremes[2]Unknown, but included at least 1,200 cavalry and 1,000 Spartans At least 100 shipsCasualties and lossesEntire expeditionary force killed, captured or sold into slavery Unknown Alcibiades
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Sicily
Sicily
Sicily
(/ˈsɪsɪli/ SISS-i-lee; Italian: Sicilia [siˈtʃiːlja], Sicilian: Sicìlia) is the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea. It is an autonomous region of Italy, in Southern Italy
Italy
along with surrounding minor islands, officially referred to as Regione Siciliana. Sicily
Sicily
is located in the central Mediterranean Sea, south of the Italian Peninsula, from which it is separated by the narrow Strait of Messina. Its most prominent landmark is Mount Etna, the tallest active volcano in Europe,[4] and one of the most active in the world, currently 3,329 m (10,922 ft) high
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Juvenal
Decimus Iūnius Iuvenālis [ˈdɛkɪmʊs ˈjuː.ni.ʊs ˈjʊ.wɛ.naː.lɪs], known in English as Juvenal
Juvenal
/ˈdʒuːvənəl/, was a Roman poet active in the late first and early second century AD. He is the author of the collection of satirical poems known as the Satires. The details of the author's life are unclear, although references within his text to known persons of the late first and early second centuries AD fix his earliest date of composition. One recent scholar argues that his first book was published in 100 or 101.[1] Because of a reference to a recent political figure, his fifth and final surviving book must date from after 127. Juvenal
Juvenal
wrote at least 16 poems in the verse form dactylic hexameter. These poems cover a range of Roman topics. This follows Lucilius—the originator of the Roman satire genre, and it fits within a poetic tradition that also includes Horace
Horace
and Persius
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Aelius Aristides
Publius Aelius Aristides
Aelius Aristides
Theodorus (Greek: Αἴλιος Ἀριστείδης; 117–181 CE) was a Greek orator and author considered to be a prime example of the Second Sophistic, a group of celebrated and highly influential orators who flourished from the reign of Nero
Nero
until c. 230 CE. More than fifty of his orations and other works survive, dating from the reigns of Antoninus Pius
Antoninus Pius
and Marcus Aurelius. His early success was interrupted by a decades-long series of illnesses for which he sought relief by divine communion with the god Asclepius, effected by interpreting and obeying the dreams that came to him while sleeping in the god’s sacred precinct; he later recorded this experience in a series of discourses titled Sacred Tales (Hieroi Logoi)
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John Tzetzes
John Tzetzes
John Tzetzes
(Greek: Ἰωάννης Τζέτζης, Iōánnēs Tzétzēs) (c
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Athens
Athens
Athens
(/ˈæθɪnz/;[3] Greek: Αθήνα, Athína [aˈθina], Ancient Greek: Ἀθῆναι, Athênai [a.tʰɛ̂ː.nai̯]) is the capital and largest city of Greece
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Rhotacism (speech Impediment)
In medical contexts, rhotacism (/ˈroʊtəsɪzəm/) is the inability to pronounce or difficulty in pronouncing the sound r. Many speech pathologists call this problem de-rhotacization, because the sounds lose their rhotic quality rather than becoming rhotic.Contents1 Language development 2 Across languages 3 See also 4 ReferencesLanguage development[edit] The rhotic sounds are usually the last ones a child masters. Some people never learn to produce them; they substitute other sounds, such as the velar approximant, the uvular approximant (often called the French R), and the uvular trill. In English, the most common occurrence of this type is a pronunciation perceived as closer to [w] (typically, though, actually the labiodental approximant [ʋ]), which is known as r-labialisation
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Eratosthenes
Sieve of Eratosthenes Foundation of Geography Eratosthenes
Eratosthenes
of Cyrene (/ɛrəˈtɒsθəniːz/; Greek: Ἐρατοσθένης ὁ Κυρηναῖος, IPA: [eratostʰénɛːs]; c. 276 BC[1] – c. 195/194 BC[2]) was a Greek mathematician, geographer, poet, astronomer, and music theorist. He was a man of learning, becoming the chief librarian at the Library of Alexandria. He invented the discipline of geography, including the terminology used today.[3] He is best known for being the first person to calculate the circumference of the Earth, which he did by comparing altitudes of the mid-day sun at two places a known North-South distance apart. His calculation was remarkably accurate. He was also the first to calculate the tilt of the Earth's axis (again with remarkable accuracy)
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