HOME TheInfoList
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff







picture info

Dissolution Of The Soviet Union
The dissolution of the Soviet Union occurred on December 26, 1991, officially granting self-governing independence to the Republics of the Soviet Union. It was a result of the declaration number 142-Н of the Supreme Soviet of the Soviet Union. The declaration acknowledged the independence of the former Soviet republics and created the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS), although five of the signatories ratified it much later or did not do so at all. On the previous day, 25 December 1991, Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev, the eighth and final leader of the Soviet Union, resigned, declared his office extinct, and handed over its powers – including control of the Soviet nuclear missile launching codes – to Russian President Boris Yeltsin
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Red Square
Red Square (Russian: Кра́сная пло́щадь, tr. Krásnaya plóshchaď, IPA: [ˈkrasnəjə ˈploɕːətʲ]) is a city square (plaza) in Moscow, Russia. It separates the Kremlin, the former royal citadel and now the official residence of the President of Russia, from a historic merchant quarter known as Kitai-gorod
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

picture info

Socialism In One Country
Socialism in one country (Russian: социализм в одной стране, tr. sotsializm v odnoi strane) was a theory put forth by Joseph Stalin and Nikolai Bukharin in 1924 which was eventually adopted by the Soviet Union as state policy. The theory held that given the defeat of all the communist revolutions in Europe in 1917–1923 except Russia, the Soviet Union should begin to strengthen itself internally. That turn toward national communism was a shift from the previously held position by classical Marxism that socialism must be established globally (world communism). However, the proponents of the theory contend that it contradicts neither world revolution nor world communism
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Soviet Famine Of 1932–33
The Soviet famine of 1932–33 was a major famine that killed millions of people in the major grain-producing areas of the Soviet Union, including Ukraine, Northern Caucasus, Volga Region and Kazakhstan, the South Urals, and West Siberia. The Holodomor in Ukraine and Kazakhstan famine of 1932–1933 have been characterized as genocide by Joseph Stalin's government, however not all historians agree with this characterization; up to 3 million people died in Ukraine and 600,000 (15% of all Kazakhs) died in Kazakhstan. Early estimates of the death toll by scholars and government officials varied greatly; anywhere from 1.8 to 5 million ethnic Ukrainians were said to have perished as a result of the famine. Recent research has since narrowed the estimates to between 2.4 and 4 million
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Operation Barbarossa
Frontline strength (initial)
  • 3,350–3,795 tanks
  • 3,030–3,072 other AFVs
  • picture info

    Latvia
    Latvia, (/ˈlætviə/ (About this sound listen); Latvian: Latvija [ˈlatvija]), officially the Republic of Latvia (Latvian: Latvijas Republika), is an independent republic in the Baltic region of Northern Europe. Since its independence, Latvia has been referred to as one of the Baltic states. It is bordered by Estonia in the northern region, Lithuania in the southern, to the east is Russia, and Belarus to the southeast, as well as sharing a maritime border with Sweden to the west
    [...More Info...]      
    [...Related Items...]



    picture info

    Estonia
    Estonia (/ɛˈstniə/ (About this sound listen); Estonian: Eesti [ˈeːsti]), officially the Republic of Estonia (Estonian: Eesti Vabariik), is a sovereign state in Northern Europe. It is bordered to the north by the Gulf of Finland with Finland on the other side, to the west by the Baltic Sea, to the south by Latvia (343 km), and to the east by Lake Peipus and Russia (338.6 km). Across the Baltic Sea lies Sweden in the west and Finland in the north. The territory of Estonia consists of a mainland and 2,222 islands in the Baltic Sea, covering a total area of 45,227 km2---> (17,462 sq mi), water 2,839 km2---> (1,096 sq mi), land area 42,388 km2---> (16,366 sq mi), and is influenced by a humid continental climate
    [...More Info...]      
    [...Related Items...]



    picture info

    Soviet Occupation Of Bessarabia And Northern Bukovina
    The Soviet occupation of Bessarabia and northern Bukovina from June 28 – July 4, 1940, of the Romanian regions of northern Bukovina and Hertza, and of Bessarabia, a region under Romanian administration since Russian Civil War times. These regions, with a total area of 50,762 km2---> (19,599 sq mi) and a population of 3,776,309 inhabitants, were subsequently incorporated into the Soviet Union. The Soviet Union had planned to accomplish the annexation with a full-scale invasion, but the Romanian government, responding to a Soviet ultimatum delivered on June 26, agreed to withdraw from the territories in order to avoid a military conflict
    [...More Info...]      
    [...Related Items...]



    picture info

    National Delimitation In The Soviet Union
    National delimitation in the Soviet Union refers to the process of creating well-defined national territorial units (Soviet socialist republics – SSR, autonomous Soviet socialist republics – ASSR, autonomous oblasts (provinces), raions (districts) and okrugs) from the ethnic diversity of the Soviet Union and its subregions
    [...More Info...]      
    [...Related Items...]



    picture info

    Soviet Invasion Of Manchuria
    21,389 - 83,737 dead (not counting POWs who died due to mistreatment in camps after the war)
    594,000–609,000 POWs
    Soviets also claimed to have captured Manchukuo:
    Most troops deserted beforehand
    Mengjiang:
    Most troops deserted beforehand


    Soviet Famine Of 1946–47
    The last major
    famine to hit the USSR began in July 1946, reached its peak in February–August 1947 and then quickly diminished in intensity, although there were still some famine deaths in 1948. The situation spanned most of the grain-producing regions of the country: Ukraine, Moldavia and parts of central Russia. The conditions were caused by drought, the effects of which were exacerbated by the devastation caused by World War II. The grain harvest in 1946 totaled 39.6 million tons - barely 40% of 1940's yield. With the war, there was a significant decrease in the number of able-bodied men in the rural population, retreating to 1931 levels. There was a shortage of agricultural machinery and horses. The Soviet government with its grain reserves provided relief to rural areas and appealed to the United Nations for relief
    [...More Info...]      
    [...Related Items...]



    Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republics Of The Soviet Union
    In
    development or moral, political, and bioethical philosophy, autonomy is the capacity to make an informed, un-coerced decision. Autonomous organizations or institutions are independent or self-governing. Autonomy can also be defined from human resource perspective and it means a level of discretion granted to an employee in his or her work. In such cases, autonomy is known to bring some sense of job satisfaction among the employees. Autonomy is a term that is also widely used and in the field of medicine
    [...More Info...]      
    [...Related Items...]



    picture info

    History Of Soviet Russia And The Soviet Union (1917–27)
    The history of Soviet Russia and the Soviet Union reflects a period of change for both Russia and the world. Though the terms Soviet Russia and Soviet Union are synonymous in everyday vocabulary, Soviet Russia, in the context of the foundation of the Soviet Union, refers to the few years after the abdication of the crown of the Russian Empire by Tsar Nicholas II (in 1917), but before the creation of the Soviet Union in 1922. Early in its conception, the Soviet Union strived to achieve harmony among all people of all countries. The original ideology of the state was primarily based on the works of Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels
    [...More Info...]      
    [...Related Items...]