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DVB-SH
DVB-SH
DVB-SH
(" Digital Video Broadcasting
Digital Video Broadcasting
- Satellite services to Handhelds") is a physical layer standard for delivering IP based media content and data to handheld terminals such as mobile phones or PDAs, based on a hybrid satellite/terrestrial downlink and for example a GPRS
GPRS
uplink. The DVB Project published the DVB-SH
DVB-SH
standard in February 2007.[1] The DVB-SH
DVB-SH
system was designed for frequencies below 3 GHz, supporting UHF band, L Band or S-band. It complements and improves the existing DVB-H
DVB-H
physical layer standard
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Alcatel-Lucent
Alcatel- Lucent
Lucent
S.A. (French pronunciation: ​[alkatɛl lysɛnt]) was a French global telecommunications equipment company, headquartered in Boulogne-Billancourt, France. It was formed in 2006 by the merger of France-based Alcatel and U.S.-based Lucent, the latter being the successor of AT&T's Western Electric.[1] The company focused on fixed, mobile and converged networking hardware, IP technologies, software and services, with operations in more than 130 countries
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Radio Frequency
Radio
Radio
frequency (RF) is any of the electromagnetic wave frequencies that lie in the range extending from around 7004200000000000000♠20 kHz to 7011300000000000000♠300 GHz, roughly the frequencies used in radio communication.[1] The term does not have an official definition, and different sources specify slightly different upper and lower bounds for the frequency range. RF usually refers to electrical rather than mechanical oscillations. However, mechanical RF systems do exist (see mechanical filter and RF MEMS). Although radio frequency is a rate of oscillation, the term "radio frequency" or its abbreviation "RF" are used as a synonym for radio – i.e., to describe the use of wireless communication, as opposed to communication via electric wires
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H.262/MPEG-2 Part 2
H.262[1] or MPEG-2
MPEG-2
Part 2 (formally known as ITU-T Recommendation H.262 and ISO/IEC 13818-2,[2] also known as MPEG-2
MPEG-2
Video) is a video coding format developed and maintained jointly by ITU-T Video Coding Experts Group (VCEG) and ISO/IEC Moving Picture Experts Group
Moving Picture Experts Group
(MPEG). It is the second part of the ISO/IEC MPEG-2
MPEG-2
standard. The ITU-T Recommendation H.262 and ISO/IEC 13818-2 documents are identical. The standard is available for a fee from the ITU-T[1] and ISO. MPEG-2
MPEG-2
Video is similar to MPEG-1, but also provides support for interlaced video (an encoding technique used in analog NTSC, PAL and SECAM television systems). MPEG-2
MPEG-2
video is not optimized for low bit-rates (less than 1 Mbit/s), but outperforms MPEG-1
MPEG-1
at 3 Mbit/s and above
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H.264/MPEG-4 AVC
H.264 or MPEG-4 Part 10, Advanced Video Coding ( MPEG-4 AVC) is a block-oriented motion-compensation-based video compression standard. As of 2014[update] it is one of the most commonly used formats for the recording, compression, and distribution of video content.[1] It supports resolutions up to 8192×4320, including 8K UHD.[2] The intent of the H.264/AVC project was to create a standard capable of providing good video quality at substantially lower bit rates than previous standards (i.e., half or less the bit rate of MPEG-2, H.263, or MPEG-4 Part 2), without increasing the complexity of design so much that it would be impractical or excessively expensive to implement
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Audio Video Standard
Audio Video Coding Standard (AVS) refers to the digital audio and digital video series compression standard formulated by Audio and Video coding standard workgroup of China according to the open international rules
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VC-1
SMPTE
SMPTE
421M, informally known as VC-1, is a video coding format
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MP3
MP3
MP3
(formally MPEG-1
MPEG-1
Audio Layer III or MPEG-2
MPEG-2
Audio Layer III)[4] is an audio coding format for digital audio. Originally defined as the third audio format of the MPEG-1
MPEG-1
standard, it was retained and further extended—defining additional bit rates and support for more audio channels—as the third audio format of the subsequent MPEG-2 standard
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Dolby Digital
Dolby Digital
Dolby Digital
is the name for audio compression technologies developed by Dolby Laboratories. Originally named Dolby Stereo
Dolby Stereo
Digital until 1994, except for Dolby TrueHD, the audio compression is lossy
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Dolby Digital Plus
Dolby Digital
Dolby Digital
Plus, also known as Enhanced AC-3 (and commonly abbreviated as DD+ or E-AC-3, or EC-3) is a digital audio compression scheme developed by Dolby Labs
Dolby Labs
for transport and storage of multi-channel digital audio. It is a successor to Dolby Digital (AC-3), also developed by Dolby, and has a number of improvements including support for a wider range of data rates (32 Kbit/s to 6144 Kbit/s), increased channel count and multi-program support (via substreams), and additional tools (algorithms) for representing compressed data and counteracting artifacts
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Super High Frequency
Super high frequency
Super high frequency
(SHF) is the ITU designation for radio frequencies (RF) in the range between 3 and 30 gigahertz (GHz). This band of frequencies is also known as the centimetre band or centimetre wave as the wavelengths range from one to ten centimetres. These frequencies fall within the microwave band, so radio waves with these frequencies are called microwaves. The small wavelength of microwaves allows them to be directed in narrow beams by aperture antennas such as parabolic dishes and horn antennas, so they are used for point-to-point communication and data links[1] and for radar. This frequency range is used for most radar transmitters, wireless LANs, satellite communication, microwave radio relay links, and numerous short range terrestrial data links
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Digital Terrestrial Multimedia Broadcast
Terrestrial refers to things related to land or the planet Earth. Terrestrial may also refer to: Terrestrial animal, an animal that lives on land opposed to living in water, or sometimes an animal that lives on or near the ground, as opposed to arboreal life (in trees)A fishing fly that simulates the appearance of a land insect is referred to as a terrestrial fly. Terrestrial ecoregion, land ecoregions, as distinct from f
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GPRS
General Packet Radio Service
General Packet Radio Service
(GPRS) is a packet oriented mobile data service on the 2G and 3G cellular communication system's global system for mobile communications (GSM). GPRS was originally standardized by European Telecommunications Standards Institute
European Telecommunications Standards Institute
(ETSI) in response to the earlier CDPD and i-mode packet-switched cellular technologies. It is now maintained by the 3rd Generation Partnership Project (3GPP).[1][2] GPRS usage is typically charged based on volume of data transferred, contrasting with circuit switched data, which is usually billed per minute of connection time. Sometimes billing time is broken down to every third of a minute
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Time-division Multiplexing
Time-division multiplexing
Time-division multiplexing
(TDM) is a method of transmitting and receiving independent signals over a common signal path by means of synchronized switches at each end of the transmission line so that each signal appears on the line only a fraction of time in an alternating pattern. It is used when the bit rate of the transmission medium exceeds that of the signal to be transmitted
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64QAM
Quadrature amplitude modulation
Quadrature amplitude modulation
(QAM) is both an analog and a digital modulation scheme. It conveys two analog message signals, or two digital bit streams, by changing (modulating) the amplitudes of two carrier waves, using the amplitude-shift keying (ASK) digital modulation scheme or amplitude modulation (AM) analog modulation scheme. The two carrier waves of the same frequency, usually sinusoids, are out of phase with each other by 90° and are thus called quadrature carriers or quadrature components — hence the name of the scheme. The modulated waves are summed, and the final waveform is a combination of both phase-shift keying (PSK) and amplitude-shift keying (ASK), or, in the analog case, of phase modulation (PM) and amplitude modulation. In the digital QAM case, a finite number of at least two phases and at least two amplitudes are used
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