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Cyclone Nargis
Extremely Severe Cyclonic Storm Nargis (نرگس [ˈnərɡɪs]) caused the worst natural disaster in the recorded history of Myanmar
Myanmar
during early May 2008.[1] The cyclone made landfall in Myanmar
Myanmar
on Friday, 2 May 2008, sending a storm surge 40 kilometres up the densely populated Irrawaddy delta, causing catastrophic destruction and at least 138,000 fatalities.[2][3][4] The Labutta Township
Labutta Township
alone was reported to have 80,000 dead, with about 10,000 more deaths in Bogale. There were around 55,000 people missing and many other deaths were found in other towns and areas, although the Myanmar
Myanmar
government's official death toll may have been under-reported, and there have been allegations that government officials stopped updating the death toll after 138,000 to minimize political fallout
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Pascal (unit)
The pascal (symbol: Pa) is the SI derived unit
SI derived unit
of pressure used to quantify internal pressure, stress, Young's modulus
Young's modulus
and ultimate tensile strength
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President Of The United States
House of RepresentativesSpeaker Paul Ryan
Paul Ryan
(R)Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R)Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi
Nancy Pelosi
(D)Co
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Bar (unit)
The bar is a metric unit of pressure, but is not approved as part of the International System of Units (SI)
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Joint Typhoon Warning Center
The Joint Typhoon Warning Center
Joint Typhoon Warning Center
(JTWC) is a joint United States
United States
Navy – United States Air Force
United States Air Force
command located in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. The JTWC is responsible for the issuing of tropical cyclone warnings in the North-West Pacific Ocean, South Pacific Ocean, and Indian Ocean for all branches of the U.S. Department of Defense
U.S. Department of Defense
and other U.S. government agencies. Their warnings are intended for the protection of primarily military ships and aircraft as well as military installations jointly operated with other countries around the world.[2] Its U.S
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Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale
The Saffir–Simpson hurricane wind scale (SSHWS), formerly the Saffir–Simpson hurricane scale (SSHS), classifies hurricanes – Western Hemisphere
Western Hemisphere
tropical cyclones that exceed the intensities of tropical depressions and tropical storms – into five categories distinguished by the intensities of their sustained winds. To be classified as a hurricane, a tropical cyclone must have maximum sustained winds of at least 74 mph (33 m/s; 64 kn; 119 km/h) ( Category 1)
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Tropical Cyclone Naming
Tropical cyclones and subtropical cyclones are named by various warning centers to provide ease of communication between forecasters and the general public regarding forecasts, watches, and warnings. The names are intended to reduce confusion in the event of concurrent storms in the same basin. Generally once storms produce sustained wind speeds of more than 33 knots (61 km/h; 38 mph), names are assigned in order from predetermined lists depending on which basin they originate. However, standards vary from basin to basin: some tropical depressions are named in the Western Pacific, while tropical cyclones must have a significant amount of gale-force winds occurring around the centre before they are named in the Southern Hemisphere. Before the formal start of naming, tropical cyclones were named after places, objects, or saints' feast days on which they occurred
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1975 Pacific Typhoon Season
A typhoon is a mature tropical cyclone that develops between 180° and 100°E in the Northern Hemisphere. This region is referred to as the Northwestern Pacific Basin,[1] and is the most active tropical cyclone basin on Earth, accounting for almost one-third of the world's annual tropical cyclones. For organizational purposes, the northern Pacific Ocean is divided into three regions: the eastern (North America to 140°W), central (140° to 180°W), and western (180° to 100°E). The Regional Specialized Meteorological Center
Regional Specialized Meteorological Center
(RSMC) for tropical cyclone forecasts is in Japan, with other tropical cyclone warning centers for the northwest Pacific in Hawaii
Hawaii
(the Joint Typhoon
Typhoon
Warning Center), the Philippines
Philippines
and Hong Kong
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2006 North Indian Ocean Cyclone Season
In meteorology, a cyclone is a large scale air mass that rotates around a strong center of low atmospheric pressure.[1][2] Cyclones are characterized by inward spiraling winds that rotate about a zone of low pressure.[3][4] The largest low-pressure systems are polar vortices and extratropical cyclones of the largest scale (the synoptic scale). Warm-core cyclones such as tropical cyclones and subtropical cyclones also lie within the synoptic scale.[5] Mesocyclones, tornadoes and dust devils lie within the smaller mesoscale.[6] Upper level cyclones can exist without the presence of a surface low, and can pinch off from the base of the tropical upper tropospheric trough during the summer months in the Northern Hemisphere
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Military Junta
A military dictatorship (also known as a military junta) is a form of government different from civilian dictatorship for a number of reasons: their motivations for seizing power, the institutions through which they organize their rule and the ways in which they leave power. Often viewing itself as saving the nation from the corrupt or myopic civilian politicians, a military dictatorship justifies its position as "neutral" arbiters on the basis of their membership within the armed forces. For example, many juntas adopt titles, such as "National Redemption Council", "Committee of National Restoration", or "National Liberation Committee"
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George W. Bush
Governor of TexasGovernorship43rd President of the United StatesPresidencyTimelinePoliciesDomestic Economic ForeignBush Doctrine International tripsLegislation & Programs Pardons SpaceAppointmentsCabinet Judicial AppointmentsFirst termCampaign for the Presidency2000 General election Primaries Bush v. Gore Florida1st inaugurationSeptember 11 attacks War on TerrorismWar in Afghanistan Invasion of IraqEmail controversySecond termRe-election campaign2004 General election Primaries2nd inaugurationWar in Iraq State of the Union, 2006 2007 Iraq
Iraq
surgeDismissal of U.S
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Tropical Cyclone Basins
Traditionally, areas of tropical cyclone formation are divided into seven basins. These include the north Atlantic Ocean, the eastern and western parts of the northern Pacific Ocean, the southwestern Pacific, the southwestern and southeastern Indian Oceans, and the northern Indian Ocean
Indian Ocean
( Arabian Sea
Arabian Sea
and Bay of Bengal). The western Pacific is the most active and the north Indian the least active
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People's Republic Of China
China, officially the People's Republic
People's Republic
of China
China
(PRC), is a unitary sovereign state in East Asia
East Asia
and the world's most populous country, with a population of around 1.404 billion.[13] Covering approximately 9,600,000 square kilometers (3,700,000 sq mi), it is the third- or fourth-largest country by total area,[k][19] depending on the source consulted. China
China
also has the most neighbor countries in the world
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Richter Scale
The so-called Richter magnitude scale
Richter magnitude scale
– more accurately, Richter's magnitude scale, or just Richter magnitude – for measuring the strength ("size") of earthquakes refers to the original "magnitude scale" developed by Charles F. Richter
Charles F. Richter
and presented in his landmark 1935 paper, and later revised and renamed the Local magnitude scale, denoted as "ML" or "ML". Because of various shortcomings of the ML scale most seismological authorities now use other scales, such as the moment magnitude scale (Mw), to report earthquake magnitudes, but much of the news media still refers to these as "Richter" magnitudes
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Saffir–Simpson Scale
Scale
Scale
or scales may refer to:Contents1 Common meanings 2 Music 3 Places 4 Science and mathematics4.1 Biology 4.2 Chemistry and materials science 4.3 Mathematics 4.4 Other sciences5 Other uses 6 See alsoCommon meanings[edit] Scale
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Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone
The Intertropical Convergence Zone
Intertropical Convergence Zone
(ITCZ), known by sailors as the doldrums, is the area encircling Earth near the Equator, where the northeast and southeast trade winds converge. The ITCZ was originally identified from the 1920s to the 1940s as the "Intertropical Front" ("ITF"), but after the recognition in the 1940s and 1950s of the significance of wind field convergence in tropical weather production, the term ITCZ was then applied.[1] When it lies near the Equator, it is called the near-equatorial trough. Where the ITCZ is drawn into and merges with a monsoonal circulation, it is sometimes referred to as a monsoon trough, a usage more common in Australia and parts of Asia
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