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Crimson
HTML/CSS[1]Crimson #DC143CB: Normalized to [0–255] (byte) H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred) Crimson
Crimson
is a strong, red color, inclining to purple
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Percent
In mathematics, a percentage is a number or ratio expressed as a fraction of 100. It is often denoted using the percent sign, "%", or the abbreviations "pct.", "pct"; sometimes the abbreviation "pc" is also used.[1] A percentage is a dimensionless number (pure number).Contents1 Examples1.1 Example 1 1.2 Example 22 History 3 Percent sign 4 Calculations 5 Percentage
Percentage
increase and decrease 6 Compounding percentages 7 Word and symbol 8 Other uses 9 Related units 10 Practical applications 11 See also 12 ReferencesExamples[edit] For example, 45% (read as "forty-five percent") is equal to ​45⁄100, 45:100, or 0.45. Percentages are often used to express a proportionate part of a total. (Similarly, one can express a number as a fraction of 1,000 using the term "per mille" or the symbol "‰".) Example 1[edit] If 50% of the total number of students in the class are male, that means that 50 out of every 100 students are male
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Madder Lake
Alizarin
Alizarin
or 1,2-dihydroxyanthraquinone (also known as Mordant
Mordant
Red 11 and Turkey Red[1]) is an organic compound with formula C 14H 8O 4 that has been used throughout history as a prominent red dye, principally for dyeing textile fabrics. Historically it was derived from the roots of plants of the madder genus.[2] In 1869, it became the first natural pigment to be synthesised synthetically.[3] Alizarin
Alizarin
is the main ingredient for the manufacture of the madder lake pigments known to painters as Rose madder
Rose madder
and Alizarin
Alizarin
crimson. Alizarin
Alizarin
in the most common usage of the term has a deep red color, but the term is also part of the name for several related non-red dyes, such as Alizarine Cyanine Green and Alizarine Brilliant Blue
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Quaternary Color
A tertiary color is a color made by mixing full saturation of one primary color with half saturation of another primary color and none of a third primary color, in a given color space such as RGB,[1] CMYK (more modern) or RYB[2] (traditional). Tertiary colors have general names, one set of names for the RGB
RGB
color wheel and a different set for the RYB
RYB
color wheel. These names are shown below. Another definition of tertiary color is provided by color theorists such as Moses Harris[3]and Josef Albers[4], who suggest that tertiary colors are created by intermixing pairs of secondary colors: orange-green, green-purple, purple-orange; or by intermixing complementary colors
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Mexico
Coordinates: 23°N 102°W / 23°N 102°W / 23; -102United Mexican States Estados Unidos Mexicanos  (Spanish)FlagCoat of armsAnthem: "Himno Nacional Mexicano" (English: "Mexican National Anthem")Capital and largest city Mexico
Mexico
City 19°26′N 99°08′W / 19.433°N 99.133°W / 19.433; -99.133Official languagesNone at federal level[b] Spanish (de facto)Recognized regional languagesSpanish 68 native languages[1]National language Spanish[b]Religion83% Roman Catholicism 10% Other Christian 0.2% Othe
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Hernán Cortés
Hernán Cortés
Hernán Cortés
de Monroy y Pizarro Altamirano, Marquis of the Valley of Oaxaca
Oaxaca
(Spanish pronunciation: [erˈnaŋ korˈtes ðe monˈroj i piˈθaro]; 1485 – December 2, 1547) was a Spanish Conquistador who led an expedition that caused the fall of the Aztec Empire
Aztec Empire
and brought large portions of what is now mainland Mexico
Mexico
under the rule of the King of Castile in the early 16th century. Cortés was part of the generation of Spanish colonizers who began the first phase of the Spanish colonization of the Americas. Born in Medellín, Spain, to a family of lesser nobility, Cortés chose to pursue adventure and riches in the New World. He went to Hispaniola
Hispaniola
and later to Cuba, where he received an encomienda (the right to the labor of certain subjects)
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Alizarin
Alizarin
Alizarin
or 1,2-dihydroxyanthraquinone (also known as Mordant
Mordant
Red 11 and Turkey Red[1]) is an organic compound with formula C 14H 8O 4 that has been used throughout history as a prominent red dye, principally for dyeing textile fabrics. Historically it was derived from the roots of plants of the madder genus.[2] In 1869, it became the first natural pigment to be synthesised synthetically.[3] Alizarin
Alizarin
is the main ingredient for the manufacture of the madder lake pigments known to painters as Rose madder
Rose madder
and Alizarin
Alizarin
crimson. Alizarin
Alizarin
in the most common usage of the term has a deep red color, but the term is also part of the name for several related non-red dyes, such as Alizarine Cyanine Green and Alizarine Brilliant Blue
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Chemist
A chemist (from Greek chēm (ía) alchemy; replacing chymist from Medieval Latin alchimista[1]) is a scientist trained in the study of chemistry. Chemists study the composition of matter and its properties. Chemists carefully describe the properties they study in terms of quantities, with detail on the level of molecules and their component atoms. Chemists carefully measure substance proportions, reaction rates, and other chemical properties. The word 'chemist' is also used to address Pharmacists in Commonwealth English. Chemists use this knowledge to learn the composition, and properties of unfamiliar substances, as well as to reproduce and synthesize large quantities of useful naturally occurring substances and create new artificial substances and useful processes. Chemists may specialize in any number of subdisciplines of chemistry. Materials scientists and metallurgists share much of the same education and skills with chemists
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Carl Gräbe
Carl Gräbe
Carl Gräbe
(German: [ˈɡʀɛːbə]; 24 February 1841 – 19 January 1927) was a German industrial and academic chemist from Frankfurt
Frankfurt
am Main who held professorships in his field at Leipzig, Königsberg, and Geneva. He is known for the first synthesis of the economically important dye, alizarin, with Liebermann, and for contributing to the fundamental nomenclature of organic chemistry. Biography[edit] Gräbe was born in Frankfurt
Frankfurt
in 1841. He studied at a vocational high school in Frankfurt
Frankfurt
and Karlsruhe Polytechnic and in Heidelberg. Later he worked for the chemical company Meister Lucius und Brüning (today Hoechst AG). He supervised the production of Fuchsine
Fuchsine
and researched violet colorants made using iodine
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Carl Liebermann
Carl Theodore Liebermann (23 February 1842 – 28 December 1914) was a German chemist and student of Adolf von Baeyer. Contents1 Life 2 Work 3 References 4 Associated articlesLife[edit] Liebermann first studied at the University of Heidelberg where Robert Wilhelm Bunsen was teaching. He then joined the group of Adolf von Baeyer at the University of Berlin where he received his Ph.D. in 1865. Together with Carl Gräbe, Liebermann synthesized the orange-red dye alizarin in 1868. After his habilitation in 1870 he became professor at the University of Berlin after Adolf von Baeyer left for the University of Strasbourg. Shortly after Liebermann retired, in 1914, he died.[1][2] Work[edit]In 1826, the French chemist Pierre Jean Robiquet had isolated from the root of a plant, madder, and defined the structure of, alizarin, a remarkable red dye
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Alum
An alum /ˈæləm/ is a type of chemical compound, usually a hydrated double sulfate salt of aluminium with the general formula XAl(SO 4) 2·12H 2O, where X is a monovalent cation such as potassium or ammonium.[1] By itself, "alum" often refers to potassium alum, with the formula KAl(SO 4) 2·12H 2O. Other alums are named after the monovalent ion, such as sodium alum and ammonium alum. The name "alum" is also used, more generally, for salts with the same formula and structure, except that aluminium is replaced by another trivalent metal ion like chromium(III), and/or sulfur is replaced by other chalcogen like selenium.[1] The most common of these analogs is chrome alum KCr(SO 4) 2·12H 2O. In some industries, the name "alum" (or "papermaker's alum") is used to refer to aluminium sulfate Al 2(SO 4) 3·nH 2O. Most industrial flocculation done with "alum" actually uses aluminium sulfate
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York
York
York
(/ˈjɔːrk/ ( listen)) is a historic walled city at the confluence of the rivers Ouse and Foss in North Yorkshire, England. The municipality is the traditional county town of the historic county of Yorkshire
Yorkshire
to which it gives its name. The city has a rich heritage and has provided the backdrop to major political events in England throughout much of its two millennia of existence. The city offers a wealth of historic attractions, of which York Minster is the most prominent, and a variety of cultural and sporting activities making it a popular tourist destination. The city was founded by the Romans as Eboracum
Eboracum
in 71 AD. It became the capital of the Roman province
Roman province
of Britannia Inferior, and later of the kingdoms of Northumbria
Northumbria
and Jórvík
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Sienna
Sienna (from Italian: terra di Siena, "Siena earth") is an earth pigment containing iron oxide and manganese oxide. In its natural state, it is yellow-brown and is called raw sienna
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Umber
Umber
Umber
is a natural brown or reddish-brown earth pigment that contains iron oxide and manganese oxide. Umber
Umber
is darker than the other similar earth pigments, ochre and sienna.[2] In its natural form, it is called raw umber. When heated (calcinated), the color becomes more intense, and the becomes known as burnt umber. The name comes from terra d'ombra, or earth of Umbria, the Italian name of the pigment. Umbria
Umbria
is a mountainous region in central Italy where the pigment was originally extracted.[2] The word also may be related to the Latin word Umbra.[3] Umber
Umber
is not one precise color, but a range of different colors, from medium to dark, from yellowish to reddish to grayish. The color of the natural earth depends upon the amount of iron oxide and manganese in the clay
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Old Spanish
Old Spanish, also known as Old Castilian (Spanish: castellano antiguo; Old Spanish: romance castellano pronounced [roˈmanʦe kasteˈʎano]) or Medieval Spanish (Spanish: español medieval), originally a colloquial Latin
Latin
spoken in the provinces of the Roman Empire that provided the root for the early form of the Spanish language that was spoken on the Iberian Peninsula
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Medieval Latin
Medieval Latin
Latin
was the form of Latin
Latin
used in the Middle Ages, primarily as a medium of scholarly exchange, as the liturgical language of Chalcedonian Christianity[dubious – discuss] and the Roman Catholic Church, and as a language of science, literature, law, and administration. Despite the clerical origin of many of its authors, medieval Latin
Latin
should not be confused with Ecclesiastical Latin. There is no real consensus on the exact boundary where Late Latin
Latin
ends and medieval Latin
Latin
begins
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