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County Of Württemberg
The County
County
of Württemberg was a historical territory with origins in the realm of the House of Württemberg, the heart of the old Duchy of Swabia. Its capital was Stuttgart.[1] From the 12th century until 1495, it was a county within the Holy Roman Empire.[2] It later became a duchy and, after the breakup of the Holy Roman Empire, a kingdom. Etymology[edit] This county was named after a hill of the same name in the district of Untertürkheim
Untertürkheim
in Rotenberg, Stuttgart, on which Wattenberg Castle stood until 1819. Until about 1350, the county appeared in records only with the spelling "Wirtenberg". History[edit] The House of Württemberg
House of Württemberg
first appeared in the late 11th century. The first family member mentioned in records was Konrad I, in 1081, who is believed to have built the castle. The Württembergs became counts in the 12th century
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Herzog
Herzog
Herzog
is a German hereditary title held by one who rules a territorial duchy, exercises feudal authority over an estate called a duchy, or possesses a right by law or tradition to be referred to by the ducal title. The word is usually translated by the English duke and the Latin dux. Generally, a Herzog
Herzog
ranks below a king and above a count.[1] Whether the title is deemed higher or lower than titles translated into English as "prince" (Fürst) has depended upon the language, country and era in which the titles co-existed.Contents1 History 2 Current usage 3 See also 4 ReferencesHistory[edit]Image of a Herzogshut, the ducal hat of a Herzog Herzog
Herzog
is not related to Herz ('heart'), but is derived from German(ic) He(e)r (English: 'army') and zog (ziehen) (English: 'to move', also: in die Schlacht ziehen – "to go into battle"), a military leader (compare to Slavic voivode)
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Schorndorf
Schorndorf
Schorndorf
is a town in Baden-Württemberg, Germany, located approx. 26 km east of Stuttgart. Its train station is the terminus of the S2 line of the Stuttgart
Stuttgart
S-Bahn. The city also is also sometimes referred to as Die Daimlerstadt (The Daimler City in English), as it is the town in which Gottlieb Daimler (1834–1900) was born.Contents1 International relations1.1 Demographics2 Mayors 3 Town Twinnings 4 Places of Interest 5 Sons and daughters of the town 6 ReferencesInternational relations[edit] Main article: List of twin towns and sister cities in Germany Demographics[edit] The numbers of inhabitants are estimates, census results (1871–1970 und 1987) or data from statistical office[2]‎ Before 1871 the results are only from the core city.Year Number of inhabitants1463 ca. 2.0001514 ca. 3.0001618 ca. 5.0001701 2.1321803 3.4341834 3.7771849 3.6171. December 1871 7.6721
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Rotenberg (Stuttgart)
Rotenberg is a village which is a part of the Untertürkheim
Untertürkheim
district of the City of Stuttgart, Germany. The area overlooks Untertürkheim and the Neckar
Neckar
valley and lies on the north and east slopes of the hill known as Württemberg
Württemberg
(previously Wirtemberg). On this hill the first castle of the Counts of Württemberg
Württemberg
was built in 1083 by Conrad of Beutelsbach
Beutelsbach
who subsequently became Konrad I, Count of Württemberg and is considered the founder of the Württemberg
Württemberg
dynasty. The hill also gave its name to the State of Württemberg. The castle was rebuilt in 1316 by Count Eberhard I. However, in about 1330 Eberhard built the "Old Castle" in what is now the centre of Stuttgart
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Graf
Graf
Graf
(male) or Gräfin (female) is a historical title of the German nobility, usually translated as "count". Considered to be intermediate among noble ranks, the title is often treated as equivalent to the British title of "earl" (whose female version is "countess").Contents1 History 2 Etymology and origin 3 Nobiliary titles containing the term graf 4 Reichsgraf 5 Margrave 6 Landgrave 7 Gefürsteter Graf 8 Burgrave
Burgrave
/ Viscount 9 Rhinegrave, Wildgrave, Raugrave, Altgrave 10 In Sweden 11 Modern usage in German surnames 12 Other uses 13 See also 14 Sources and references 15 External linksHistory[edit] The comital title of Graf
Graf
is common to various European territories where German was or is the official or vernacular tongue, including Austria, Germany, Switzerland, Luxembourg, Liechtenstein, Alsace, the Baltic states
Baltic states
and other former Habsburg crown lands
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House Of Hohenstaufen
The Staufer, also known as the House of Staufen, or of Hohenstaufen (German: [ˌhoːənˈʃtaʊfən]), were a dynasty of German kings (1138–1254) during the Middle Ages. Besides Germany, they also ruled the Kingdom of Sicily
Kingdom of Sicily
(1194–1268). In Italian historiography, they are known as the Svevi (Swabians), since they were (successive) dukes of Swabia from 1079
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Ulrich I, Count Of Württemberg
Ulrich I, Count of Württemberg
Württemberg
(1226 – 25 February 1265), also known as “Ulrich der Stifter” or “Ulrich mit dem Daumen”, was count of Württemberg
Württemberg
from about 1241 until his death.Life[edit]Seal of Ulrich I (1259)Ulrich's relation to his predecessors is uncertain. The historian Hansmartin Decker Hauff calls Ulrich the son of Hermann of Württemberg
Württemberg
and Irmengard of Ulten. Hermann, who is mentioned only once, in 1231, is probably a son of Hartmann, Count of Württemberg. He was a cousin of Count Hartmann II of Grüningen and a relative on his father's side of the count Albert IV. Ulrich was twice married. From his first marriage, to Mechthild of Baden, daughter of Hermann V he had two daughters and a son, who would succeed him as Count Ulrich II
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Waiblingen
Waiblingen
Waiblingen
(German pronunciation: [ˈvaɪblɪŋən]) is a town in the southwest of Germany, located in the center of the densely populated Stuttgart
Stuttgart
Region, directly neighboring Stuttgart. It is the capital of the Rems-Murr
Rems-Murr
district. As of September 30, 2004 Waiblingen accommodated 52,948 inhabitants (25,953 men and 26,995 women). As of December 31, 2004, the area of the town (including all external properties, such as forests) was 42.76 km2 (16.51 sq mi).Contents1 History 2 Incorporation 3 Economy 4 International relations 5 Notable people 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] Waiblingen
Waiblingen
was first mentioned in Carolingian
Carolingian
documents in 885 at the time of Charles the Fat
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Ulrich III, Count Of Württemberg
Ulrich III (after 1286 – 11 July 1344) Count of Württemberg
Württemberg
from 1325 until 1344. Ulrich was already strongly involved in politics during the reign of his father Eberhard I. In 1319 he handled a treaty with King Frederick I, the Handsome. He renewed this treaty after assuming reign in 1325, when Württemberg
Württemberg
had temporarily joined sides with Louis IV. Both Louis and Frederick claimed power in the Holy Roman Empire
Holy Roman Empire
at this time. After their reconciliation it was possible for Ulrich to be bound closely to the Holy Roman Empire, even after the death of Frederick I. This and his regional policy of pacts and acquisitions helped strongly to enlarge Württemberg's territory substantially. Besides several gains in Alsace, the purchase of Markgröningen
Markgröningen
1336 and Tübingen
Tübingen
1342 are notable
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Nürtingen
Nürtingen
Nürtingen
( listen (help·info)) is a town in the district of Esslingen in Baden-Württemberg
Baden-Württemberg
in southern Germany. It is located on the river Neckar.Contents1 Districts1.1 Hardt 1.2 Neckarhausen 1.3 Raidwangen 1.4 Reudern 1.5 Zizishausen 1.6 Oberensingen 1.7 Roßdorf2 History 3 20th century 4 Education 5 Mayors since 1819 6 Notable people 7 Local council 8 Twinnings 9 Notes 10 External linksDistricts[edit] Hardt[edit] Hardt (929 inhabitants, as of 2012) is the smallest district of Nürtingen. Hardt was first mentioned in 1366 in documents. Neckarhausen[edit] Neckarhausen (3,768 inhabitants, as of 2012) is about 2  km from Nürtingen. Neckarhausen was first mentioned in the year 1284
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Kingdom Of Württemberg
The Kingdom of Württemberg
Württemberg
(German: Königreich Württemberg; German pronunciation: [ˌkøːnɪkʁai̯ç ˈvʏʁtm̩bɛʁk]) was a German state that existed from 1805 to 1918, located within the area that is now Baden-Württemberg. The kingdom was a continuation of the Duchy of Württemberg, which existed from 1495 to 1805.[1] Prior to 1495, Württemberg
Württemberg
was a County in the former Duchy of Swabia, which had dissolved after the death of Duke Conradin
Conradin
in 1268. The borders of the Kingdom of Württemberg, as defined in 1813, lay between 47°34' and 49°35' north and 8°15' and 10°30' east. The greatest distance north to south comprised 225 kilometres (140 mi) and the greatest east to west was 160 kilometres (99 mi)
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Neuffen
Neuffen
Neuffen
is a town in the district of Esslingen, in Baden-Württemberg in southern Germany.Contents1 Geography 2 Neighboring communities 3 Constituent 4 History 5 Incorporations 6 Religion 7 Economics and Infrastructure7.1 Transportation 7.2 Water Supply 7.3 Waste 7.4 Educational institutions8 Leisure and sports facilities 9 Points of interest 10 Museums 11 Buildings 12 Personality12.1 Freeman 12.2 Sons and daughters of the city 12.3 Individuals who have lived or worked in Neuffen13 ReferencesGeography[edit] It is located 14 km northeast of Reutlingen, and 28 km southeast of Stuttgart. Its major attraction is a quite impressive castle with strong walls, the Hohenneuffen, which lies high above the town at the ridge of the Swabian Jura. Neuffen
Neuffen
is located on the northern edge of the Swabian Jura, the so-called Albtrauf
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German Language
No official regulation ( German orthography
German orthography
regulated by the Council for German Orthography[4]). Language
Language
codesISO 639-1 deISO 639-2 ger (B) deu (T)ISO 639-3 Variously: deu – German gmh&#
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Eberhard IV, Count Of Württemberg
Eberhard IV of Württemberg
Württemberg
(23 August 1388, Stuttgart
Stuttgart
– 2 July 1419, Waiblingen) was the ruling Count of Württemberg
Württemberg
from 1417 until his death. Life[edit] He was elder son of Count Eberhard III and Antonia Visconti. On 13 November 1397 he became engaged to Henriette of Mömpelgard. Henriette was the oldest daughter and main heiress of Henry of Mömpelgard, who died in 1396 one year before his father, Count Stephan of Mömpelgard. Their marriage, which occurred in 1407 at the latest, caused the county of Mömpelgard to become part of Württemberg. Eberhard IV also had a child with Agnes von Dagersheim. Eberhard IV took active part in management of the state from 1407. Starting 1409 he governed the county of Mömpelgard together with Henriette. After the death of Eberhard III on 16 May 1417, he became the ruler of all of Württemberg
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Henriette, Countess Of Montbéliard
Henriette (1387 – 14 February 1444) was Sovereign Countess of Montbéliard
Montbéliard
from 1397 until 1444. She was the daughter of Henry of Orbe (died 1396), and the heiress of her grandfather, Stephen, Count of Montbéliard.[1] Her great-grandfather was Henry I of Montbéliard. She married Eberhard IV, Count of Württemberg
Württemberg
and governed the city of Montbéliard together with her husband. It was because of this marriage that Montbéliard
Montbéliard
became a part of Württemberg. At his death in 1419, she took over the regency for her son Ulrich
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Ulrich V, Count Of Württemberg
Ulrich V of Württemberg
Württemberg
called "der Vielgeliebte" (the much loved) (1413[1] – 1 September 1480 in Leonberg), Count of Württemberg. He was the younger son of Count Eberhard IV and Henriette of Mömpelgard.Contents1 Life 2 Family and children 3 Notes 4 ReferencesLife[edit] After the early death of his father, his mother, together with the Württembergian councils, took over the guardianship for Ulrich and his older brother Ludwig I. Ludwig reached maturity in 1426 and took rule in his own hands, until his brother Ulrich in 1433 was admitted to co-rule. After some years of common government Ulrich wed Margaret of Cleves and put through the division of the county. This was confirmed 23 April 1441. Ulrich received the eastern and northern parts with the capital in Stuttgart. Ludwig the western and southern land part with the capital in Urach, as well as the territories in Alsace
Alsace

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