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Condrusi
The Condrusi
Condrusi
were a Germanic tribe of ancient Belgium, which takes its name from the political and ethnic group known to the Romans as the Belgae.[1] The Condrusi
Condrusi
were probably located in the region now known as Condroz, named after them, between Liège and Namur. The terrain is wooded hills on the northeastern edge of the Ardennes. The Belgae
Belgae
were distinguished from the Celts
Celts
and apparently claimed to be of Germanic descent. From Belgic names we know that the Belgae
Belgae
were heavily influenced by the Gaulish
Gaulish
language, but from other information we know that they were also heavily influenced by Germanic peoples
Germanic peoples
on the east of the Rhine
Rhine
river
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Germanic Peoples
The Germanic peoples
Germanic peoples
(also called Teutonic, Suebian, or Gothic in older literature) are an Indo-European ethno-linguistic group of Northern European origin.[1] They are identified by their use of Germanic languages, which diversified out of Proto-Germanic
Proto-Germanic
during the Pre-Roman Iron Age.[2] The term "Germanic" originated in classical times when groups of tribes living in Lower, Upper, and Greater Germania
Germania
were referred to using this label by Roman scribes. The Roman use of the term "Germanic" was not necessarily based upon language, but referred to the tribal groups and alliances that lived in the regions of modern-day Luxembourg, Belgium, Northern France, Alsace, Poland, Austria, the Netherlands
Netherlands
and Germany, and which were considered less civilized and more physically hardened than the Celtic Gauls
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Ampsivarii
The Ampsivarii, sometimes referenced by modern writers as Ampsivari (a simplification not warranted by the sources), were a Germanic tribe mentioned by ancient authors.[1] Their homeland was originally around the middle of the river Ems, which flows into the North Sea, at the Dutch-German border. Most likely they lived between the Bructeri
Bructeri
minores (located at the delta of the Yssel) and the Bructerii maiores that were living south of them at the end of the Ems. The name for them is supposed to be a Latin rendering of the Germanic "Ems-werer", meaning "men of the Ems". Reconstruction of the location of other tribes in the area places the Ampsivarii
Ampsivarii
at the lower Ems
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Gallia Belgica
Gallia Belgica
Gallia Belgica
("Belgic Gaul") was a province of the Roman empire located in the north-eastern part of Roman Gaul, in what is today primarily Belgium, Luxembourg
Luxembourg
and the Netherlands. In 50 BC after the conquest by Julius Caesar
Julius Caesar
during his Gallic Wars, it became one of the three main provinces of Gaul
Gaul
(known as the Tres Galliae, the other two being Gallia Aquitania
Gallia Aquitania
and Gallia Lugdunensis).[1] An official Roman province
Roman province
was later created by emperor Augustus
Augustus
in 22 BC. The province was named for the Belgae, as the largest tribal confederation in the area, but also included the territories of the Treveri, Mediomatrici, Leuci, Sequani, Helvetii
Helvetii
and others
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Germania Inferior
Germania
Germania
Inferior ("Lower Germany") was a Roman province
Roman province
located on the west bank of the Rhine. According to Ptolemy (2.9), Germania Inferior included the Rhine
Rhine
from its mouth up to the mouth of the Obringa, a river identified with either the Aar
Aar
or the Moselle
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Pagus
In the later Western Roman Empire, following the reorganization of Diocletian, a pagus (compare French pays, Spanish pago, "a region, terroir") became the smallest administrative district of a province. By that time the word had long been in use with various meanings. Smith's Dictionary says of it, "The meaning of this word cannot be given in precise and absolute terms, partly because we can have no doubt that its significance varied greatly between the earliest and the later times of Roman history, partly because of its application by Latin writers to similar, but not identical, communities outside Italy ..."[1]Contents1 Etymology 2 Roman usage 3 Post-Roman pagus 4 Notes 5 Bibliography 6 External linksEtymology[edit] Pāgus is a native Latin word from a root pāg-, a lengthened grade of Indo-European *pag-, a verbal root, "fasten" (English peg), which in the word may be translated as "boundary staked out on the ground".[2] In semantics, *pag- used in pāgus is a s
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Civitas
In the history of Rome, the Latin
Latin
term civitas (plural civitates,Latin pronunciation: [kɪwɪtaːs] ), according to Cicero
Cicero
in the time of the late Roman Republic, was the social body of the cives, or citizens, united by law (concilium coetusque hominum jure sociati). It is the law that binds them together, giving them responsibilities (munera) on the one hand and rights of citizenship on the other. The agreement (concilium) has a life of its own, creating a res publica or "public entity" (synonymous with civitas), into which individuals are born or accepted, and from which they die or are ejected. The civitas is not just the collective body of all the citizens, it is the contract binding them all together, because each of them is a civis.[1] Civitas
Civitas
is an abstract formed from civis
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Carolingian
Non-agnatic lines:Robertian dynastyHouse of Capet Bosonid dynastyCarolingian dynastyThe Carolingian cross.PippinidsPippin the Elder (c. 580–640) Grimoald (616–656) Childebert the Adopted
Childebert the Adopted
(d. 662)Arnulfings Arnulf of Metz
Arnulf of Metz
(582–640) Ansegisel (d. 662 or 679) Chlodulf of Metz (d. 696 or 697) Pepin of Herstal
Pepin of Herstal
(635-714) Grimoald II (d. 714) Drogo of Champagne
Drogo of Champagne
(670–708) Theudoald (d. 741)Carolingians Charles Martel
Charles Martel
(686–741) Carloman (d
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Ambrones
The Ambrones
Ambrones
(Ancient Greek: Ἄμβρωνες) were an ancient tribe, believed by the Romans to have come from Jutland,[1] that appeared briefly in the Roman sources relating to the 2nd century BC.[2] In the late 2nd century BC, along with the fellow Cimbri
Cimbri
and Teutons, the Ambrones
Ambrones
were said to have migrated from their original homes and invaded the Roman Republic, winning a spectacular victory at the Battle of Arausio
Battle of Arausio
in 105 BC
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Angrivarii
The Angrivarii
Angrivarii
were a Germanic tribe of the early Roman Empire mentioned briefly in Ptolemy
Ptolemy
as the Angriouarroi (Ancient Greek: Ἀνγριουάρροι), which transliterates into Latin Angrivari. They are believed to be the source of the 8th century identity, Angrarii, which was one of three subdivisions of Saxony
Saxony
(the others were Westfalahi and Ostfalahi). The name appears earliest in the Annales and Germania
Germania
of Tacitus
Tacitus
as Angrivarii. In post-classical times the name of the people had a number of different spellings in addition to the ones just mentioned: Angarii, Aggeri, Aggerimenses, Angerienses, Angri, Angeri
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Belgium
Coordinates: 50°50′N 4°00′E / 50.833°N 4.000°E / 50.833; 4.000Kingdom of BelgiumKoninkrijk België  (Dutch) Royaume de Belgique  (French) Königreich Belgien  (German)FlagCoat of armsMotto: "Eendracht maakt macht" (Dutch) "L'union fait la force" (French) "Einigkeit macht stark" (German) "Unity makes Strength"Anthem: "La Brabançonne" "The Brabantian"Location of  Belgium  (dark green) – in Europe  (green & dark grey) – in the European Union  (green)Capital and largest city Brussels 50°51′N 4°21′E / 50.850°N 4.350°E / 50.850; 4.350Official languages Dutch French GermanEthnic groups see DemographicsReligion (2015[1])60.7% Christianity 32.0% No religion 5.2% Islam 2.1% Other religionsDemonym BelgianGovernment Federal parliamentary constitu
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Bastarnae
The Bastarnae
Bastarnae
(Latin variants: Bastarni, or Basternae; Ancient Greek: Βαστάρναι or Βαστέρναι) were an ancient people who between 200 BC and 300 AD inhabited the region between the Carpathian mountains and the river Dnieper, to the north and east of ancient Dacia
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Bructeri
The Bructeri
Bructeri
(Greek Βρούκτεροι; but Βουσάκτεροι in Strabo) were a Germanic tribe in Roman imperial times, located in northwestern Germany, in present-day North Rhine-Westphalia. Their territory included both sides of the upper Ems (Latin Amisia) and Lippe (Latin Luppia) rivers. At its greatest extent, their territory apparently stretched between the vicinities of the Rhine
Rhine
in the west and the Teutoburg Forest
Teutoburg Forest
and Weser
Weser
river in the east
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Cananefates
The Cananefates, or Canninefates, Caninefates, or Canenefatae, meaning "leek masters",[1] were a Germanic tribe,[2] who lived in the Rhine delta, in western Batavia (later Betuwe), in the Roman province of Germania Inferior
Germania Inferior
(now in the Dutch province of Zuid-Holland), before and during the Roman conquest. Apparently, the name had its origins in the fact that the Cananefates lived on sandy soils that were considered excellent for growing Alliums such as leeks and onions.[3] At the beginning of the Batavian rebellion
Batavian rebellion
under Gaius Julius Civilis in the year 69, the Batavians sent envoys to the Canninefates to urge a common policy
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Chamavi
The Chamavi
Chamavi
were a Germanic tribe
Germanic tribe
of Roman imperial times whose name survived into the Early Middle Ages. They first appear under that name in the 1st century AD Germania
Germania
of Tacitus
Tacitus
as a Germanic tribe
Germanic tribe
that lived to the north of the Lower Rhine. Their name probably survives in the region today called Hamaland, which is in the Gelderland
Gelderland
province of the Netherlands, between the IJssel
IJssel
and Ems rivers.Contents1 Etymology 2 Location and historical mentions 3 See also 4 References 5 SourcesEtymology[edit] Various proposals have been made. The ending of the name is found in various Greek and Roman forms that are similar to other tribes
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Chasuarii
The Chasuarii were an ancient Germanic tribe known from the reports of authors writing in the time of the Roman empire. They lived somewhere to the east and north of the Rhine, near the modern river Hase, which feeds into the Ems. This means they lived near modern Osnabruck. Tacitus in his Germania
Germania
(Chapter 34) says they are between Ems and Weser, to the north of the Angrivarii
Angrivarii
and Chamavi
Chamavi
(who had also expanded into the area once belonging to the Bructeri, between Ems, Weser
Weser
and Lippe). In this same area as the Chasuarii were the Dulgubnii (but then probably nearer the Weser). To their north, on the coast of the North Sea, were the Chauci
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