HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Cleopatra
Cleopatra VII
Cleopatra VII
Philopator (Greek: Κλεοπάτρα Φιλοπάτωρ Cleopatra
Cleopatra
Philopator;[8] 69 – August 10 or 12, 30 BC)[note 1] was a queen and last active ruler of the Ptolemaic Kingdom
Ptolemaic Kingdom
of Egypt, briefly survived as pharaoh by her son Caesarion
Caesarion
for eighteen days. She was also a diplomat, naval commander, administrator, linguist, and medical author.[9] As a member of the Ptolemaic dynasty, she was a descendant of its founder Ptolemy I, a Macedonian Greek general and companion of Alexander the Great
[...More...]

"Cleopatra" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Comitium
The Comitium
Comitium
(Italian: Comizio) was the original open-air public meeting space of Ancient Rome, and had major religious and prophetic significance.[1] The name comes from the Latin
Latin
word for "assembly".[2] The
[...More...]

"Comitium" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Multilingualism
Multilingualism
Multilingualism
is the use of more than one language, either by an individual speaker or by a community of speakers. It is believed that multilingual speakers outnumber monolingual speakers in the world's population.[1] More than half of all Europeans
Europeans
claim to speak at least one language other than their mother tongue;[2] nevertheless, many of these are monoscriptual. Multilingualism
Multilingualism
is becoming a social phenomenon governed by the needs of globalization and cultural openness.[3] Owing to the ease of access to information facilitated by the Internet, individuals' exposure to multiple languages is becoming increasingly frequent, thereby promoting a need to acquire additional languages. People who speak several languages are also called polyglots.[4] Multilingual speakers have acquired and maintained at least one language during childhood, the so-called first language (L1)
[...More...]

"Multilingualism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Rostra
The Rostra
Rostra
(Italian: Rostri) was a large platform built in the city of Rome
Rome
that stood during the republican and imperial periods.[1] Speakers would stand on the rostra and face the north side of the comitium towards the senate house and deliver orations to those assembled in between. It is often referred to as a suggestus or tribunal,[2] the first form of which dates back to the Roman Kingdom, the Vulcanal.[3][4] It derives its name from the six rostra (plural of rostrum, a warship's ram) which were captured during the victory at Antium
Antium
in 338 BC and mounted to its side.[5] Originally, the term meant a single structure located within the Comitium
Comitium
space near the Forum and usually associated with the Senate Cūria
[...More...]

"Rostra" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Curia Julia
Coordinates: 41°53′34.55″N 12°29′7.45″E / 41.8929306°N 12.4854028°E / 41.8929306; 12.4854028 Curia
Curia
JuliaLocation Regione VIII Forum Romanum [1]Built in 44-29 BCBuilt by/for Julius CaesarType of structure CuriaRelated List of ancient monuments in Rome Curia
Curia
JuliaThe Curia
Curia
Julia (Latin: Curia
Curia
Iulia, Italian: Curia
Curia
Iulia) is the third named Curia, or Senate House, in the ancient city of Rome. It was built in 44 BC, when Julius Caesar
Julius Caesar
replaced Faustus Cornelius Sulla's reconstructed Curia
Curia
Cornelia, which itself had replaced the Curia
Curia
Hostilia. Caesar did so to redesign both spaces within the Comitium
Comitium
and the Roman Forum
[...More...]

"Curia Julia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Dynasty
A dynasty (UK: /ˈdɪnəsti/, US: /ˈdaɪnəsti/) is a sequence of rulers from the same family,[1] usually in the context of a feudal or monarchical system, but sometimes also appearing in elective republics. The dynastic family or lineage may be known as a "house",[2] which may be styled as "royal", "princely", "ducal", "comital", etc., depending upon the chief or present title borne by its members. Historians periodize the histories of many sovereign states, such as Ancient Egypt, the Carolingian Empire
Carolingian Empire
and Imperial China, using a framework of successive dynasties. As such, the term "dynasty" may be used to delimit the era during which the family reigned and to describe events, trends, and artifacts of that period ("a Ming-dynasty vase")
[...More...]

"Dynasty" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Greek Language
Greek (Modern Greek: ελληνικά [eliniˈka], elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα [eliniˈci ˈɣlosa] ( listen), ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece
Greece
and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean
[...More...]

"Greek Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

First Triumvirate
The First Triumvirate
Triumvirate
is a term historians use for an informal political alliance of three prominent men between 59 and 53 BC, during the late Roman Republic: Gaius Julius Caesar, Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus (Pompey the Great), and Marcus Licinius Crassus. Julius Caesar
Julius Caesar
was a prominent politician with the populares faction and was eventually renowned for his conquest of Gaul (58-50 BC). Pompey was considered the greatest military commander of his time and commanded armies in the Third Servile War
Third Servile War
(73–71 BC) in Italy and the Third Mithridatic War
Third Mithridatic War
(73–63 BC) against the Kingdom of Pontus in West Asia. This gave him great prestige and popularity. Crassus
Crassus
was a property speculator, the largest landlord, and the richest man in Rome
[...More...]

"First Triumvirate" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Horus Name
The Horus
Horus
name is the oldest known and used crest of Ancient Egyptian rulers. It belongs to the "Great five names" of an Egyptian pharaoh. However, modern Egyptologists and linguists are starting to prefer the more neutral term: the "serekh name". This is because not every pharaoh had placed the falcon, which symbolizes the deity Horus, atop his (or in some cases, her) serekh.[1]Contents1 Heraldic appearance 2 Symbology 3 Introduction and history 4 Special
Special
serekhs 5 See also 6 ReferencesHeraldic appearance[edit] The picture of the Horus
Horus
name is made of two basic elements: A sitting or walking figure of a certain deity holds a rectangular, ornamental vignette, imitating the floor plan of a palace facade and the royal courtyard. The rectangular vignette is called serekh, after the Egyptian word for "facade". There are countless variations of the facade decor in the serekh
[...More...]

"Horus Name" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ancient Navies And Vessels
Ancient navies had a large impact on the navies of today. The outcomes of battles between ancient navies have been studied by the military to learn tactics that would help in their conquests. The ships that these civilizations created were what many ship designs were based on and allowed the vessels to become better built
[...More...]

"Ancient Navies And Vessels" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ancient Greek Medicine
Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
medicine was a compilation of theories and practices that were constantly expanding through new ideologies and trials. Many components were considered in ancient Greek medicine, intertwining the spiritual with the physical. Specifically, the ancient Greeks
Greeks
believed health was affected by the humors,geographic location, social class, diet, trauma, beliefs, and mindset. Early on the ancient Greeks believed that illnesses were "divine punishments" and that healing was a "gift from the Gods".[1] As trials continued wherein theories were tested against symptoms and results, the pure spiritual beliefs regarding "punishments" and "gifts" were replaced with a foundation based in the physical, i.e., cause and effect.[1] Humorism
Humorism
(or the four humors) refers to blood, yellow bile, black bile, and phlegm
[...More...]

"Ancient Greek Medicine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Roman Sculpture
The study of Roman sculpture
Roman sculpture
is complicated by its relation to Greek sculpture
[...More...]

"Roman Sculpture" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Altes Museum
The Altes Museum
Altes Museum
(German for Old Museum) is a museum building on Museum Island
Museum Island
in Berlin, Germany. Since restoration work in 2010–11, it houses the Antikensammlung (antiquities collection) of the Berlin State Museums.[1] The museum building was built between 1823 and 1830 by the architect Karl Friedrich Schinkel
Karl Friedrich Schinkel
in the neoclassical style to house the Prussian royal family's art collection. The historic, protected building counts among the most distinguished in neoclassicism and is a high point of Schinkel's career.[2] Until 1845, it was called the Königliches Museum (Royal Museum)
[...More...]

"Altes Museum" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Via Appia
The Appian
Appian
Way ( Latin
Latin
and Italian: Via Appia) was one of the earliest and strategically most important Roman roads
Roman roads
of the ancient republic. It connected Rome
Rome
to Brindisi, in southeast Italy.[1] Its importance is indicated by its common name, recorded by Statius:[2][3]Appia longarum..
[...More...]

"Via Appia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Diadem
A diadem is a type of crown, specifically an ornamental headband worn by monarchs and others as a badge of royalty. The word derives from the Greek διάδημα diádēma, "band" or "fillet",[1] from διαδέω diadéō, "I bind round", or "I fasten".[2] The term originally referred to the embroidered white silk ribbon, ending in a knot and two fringed strips often draped over the shoulders, that surrounded the head of the king to denote his authority. Such ribbons were also used to crown victorious athletes in important sports games in antiquity. It was later applied to a metal crown, generally in a circular or "fillet" shape
[...More...]

"Diadem" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Egyptian Hieroglyphs
Egyptian hieroglyphs
Egyptian hieroglyphs
(/ˈhaɪrəˌɡlɪf, -roʊ-/[2][3]) were the formal writing system used in Ancient Egypt. It combined logographic, syllabic and alphabetic elements, with a total of some 1,000 distinct characters.[4][5] Cursive hieroglyphs
Cursive hieroglyphs
were used for religious literature on papyrus and wood. The later hieratic and demotic Egyptian scripts were derived from hieroglyphic writing; Meroitic was a late derivation from demotic. The use of hieroglyphic writing arose from proto-literate symbol systems in the Early Bronze Age, around the 32nd century BC (Naqada III),[1] with the first decipherable sentence written in the Egyptian language dating to the Second Dynasty
Second Dynasty
(28th century BC)
[...More...]

"Egyptian Hieroglyphs" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.